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FAQ

FAQ

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) help customers find more information about company services and how products work.

Energy4 is here to help business customers. Due to many FAQs information requests being asked by Business customers, Energy4 has formulated the following Frequently Asked Questions page to assist business customers further.

Please review our Frequently Asked Questions information  below. Please contact Energy4 by Telephone 01256643634 – South Office & 01642888814 – North Office or by Email for further questions?

FAQ stands for Frequently Asked Questions, and an FAQ page on your website is an organized collection of valuable information that your customers ask about your products and services. This page is a useful way to organize information that your customers often ask. FAQ pages can offer lots of benefits, including:

Improve your customer’s experience.

Provide quick information to help customers make a purchasing decision.

Reduce the time your employees need to answer simple questions.

FAQs FAQs FAQs FAQs FAQs FAQs FAQs FAQs FAQs FAQs

Am I on the best tariff with my supplier? You may be on a tariff with your supplier, however without evidence; you will not know this is the best tariff that your current supplier can offer. Suppliers will not quote other suppliers. Prices may not be necessarily the best on the market to meet your needs.

Why waste time checking with other suppliers when you can leave it all to Energy4? Our expert helps you can trust, with current energy market prices.

The energy market is highly competitive, with prices and tariffs changing. Cheapest rates are constantly moving between energy suppliers, that includes the Big Six and others. It makes it difficult to say for sure which supplier is the most affordable.

Am I on the best tariff

Customers must allow Energy4 to prepare a compare energy supplier list. Allowing your tariff to slip from a fixed period contract to a variable one is one of the costliest moves to make in business. Be aware of when your current contract is coming to an end.

Energy4 helps business customers stay on top of the latest energy deals from all of our suppliers. Energy4 will provide lists, clearly identifying the cheapest energy supplier for you. Energy4 can offer energy savings alerts performing all the work, spending time searching for the best energy deals again.

Who is the best energy supplier depends on what’s important to you?

Is it the supplier who has the best ratings? Cheapest? Has the best ratings? Or is it the most environmentally friendly?

With all of these factors, we cannot say who the best energy supplier is. What we can do is present you with options to help you make the right choice for you. It’s important to understand that the energy market is constantly changing. New tariffs on the market, supplier ratings change, and greener energy sources are always in development. For this reason, it’s essential that you compare energy suppliers regularly.

Best Tariffs based on energy price cap

Energy price cap to increase in April but consumers should switch to save money

Big increase in wholesale energy prices push up price cap by £96 to £1,138 to pre-pandemic levels

The price cap continues to save consumers up to £100 a year and they can save up to £150 more by switching tariff

Support is available for those struggling to pay their energy bills, especially
those in vulnerable circumstances 

Ofgem has announced today that from 1 April 2021 the price cap will return to pre-pandemic levels, principally as a result of changes in wholesale energy prices.

When wholesale prices fell sharply last year in the wake of the first lockdown, the level of the price cap fell by £84 in October to its lowest level yet for the current winter period.  

Demand for energy has since recovered which has pushed wholesale prices back up to more normal levels.

For six months from 1 April the price cap will increase by £96 to £1,138 for 11 million default tariff customers, and by £87 to £1,156 for 4 million pre-payment meter customers.

The price cap protects consumers who have not switched energy supplier by ensuring they pay a fair price for their electricity and gas.

Ofgem adjusts the level of the cap up or down twice a year to reflect the costs of supplying electricity and gas for suppliers.  

Households on default tariffs are saving an estimated £75-£100 a year or £1 billion in total on their energy bills as a result.

Consumers who want to avoid the increase and save money should shop around ahead of the increase in the price cap on 1 April.

Jonathan Brearley, chief executive of Ofgem, said: 

“Energy bill increases are never welcome, especially as many households are struggling with the impact of the pandemic. We have carefully scrutinised these changes to ensure that customers only pay a fair price for their energy.

“The price cap offers a safety net against poor pricing practices, saving customers up to £100 a year, but if they want to avoid the increase in April they should shop around for a cheaper deal.

“As the UK still faces challenges around COVID-19, during this exceptional time I expect suppliers to set their prices competitively, treat all customers fairly and ensure that any household in financial distress is given access to the support they need.

“The government and Ofgem have been working with the energy industry and consumer groups to support customers through this difficult time and I urge anyone worried about paying their energy bills to contact their supplier and access the help available.”

For the default tariff price cap level starting on 1 April, Ofgem has also allowed suppliers to claim £23 to cover higher levels of bad debt from more customers being unable to pay their energy bills due to the impact of COVID-19.

This will ensure suppliers can continue to supply energy and protect their customers, especially those in vulnerable circumstances.

Suppliers are required to provide emergency credit to customers struggling to top up their pre-payment meters, put those who are behind on their bills on affordable repayment plans and should not disconnect their customers.

Many have gone further in providing support over the last year, for example helping pre-payment meter customers who are shielding to top up.

Notes to editors

  1. Help available for consumers:

Ofgem rules require suppliers to offer emergency credit to pre-payment meter customers and put customers struggling to pay their energy bills on realistic and sustainable debt repayment plans based on their ability to pay. 

If customers are struggling to pay for energy bills they should contact their energy supplier as soon as possible. Depending on their circumstances, customers may be eligible for extra help with their energy bills or services, such as payment breaks, suspending credit meter disconnections, and schemes like the Winter Fuel Payment or Warm Home Discount rebate.

The Citizens Advice consumer service can provide advice on how customers can resolve problems with their energy provider. For complex or urgent cases, or if a person is in a vulnerable situation they may then be referred onto the Extra Help Unit.  

For help on how to switch to a better deal, see Ofgem’s guide.

  1. The price cap is a cap on a unit of gas and electricity, with standing charges taken into account. It is not a cap on customers’ overall energy bills, which will still rise or fall in line with their energy consumption. 
  2. The £1,138 per year level of the cap is based on a household with typical consumption on a dual electricity and gas bill paying by direct debit. Customers who pay by standard credit (cash or cheque) pay an additional £85 based on the higher cost for suppliers to serve them. The additional allowance for COVID-19 bad debt (see below) does not apply to the pre-payment meter level of the cap, which explains the wider difference for the next price cap period. The values shown in the text above include VAT, and are expressed for the current Typical Domestic Consumption Values (TDCV) of 2,900kWh of electricity, 12,000kWh of gas, and 4,200kWh of electricity for Economy 7.  
  3. Wholesale adjustment: Following a judicial review (JR), a judge ordered Ofgem to reconsider how we calculated wholesale energy costs for the first cap period when the default cap was introduced. We made a one-off £15 temporary wholesale adjustment for the current price cap period so suppliers can recover these costs. This adjustment will be removed for the next price cap period starting on 1 April. It does not apply to the prepayment level of the cap.
  4. COVID-19 bad debt: The default tariff price cap from 1 April includes an additional allowance to allow suppliers to start to recover some of their additional costs related to COVID-19, such as higher levels of bad debt from more customers being unable to pay their energy bills. This is based on a highly conservative assessment. In order to minimise the impact on consumers of higher bills, suppliers will have to recover some of the costs in a phased approach between April 2021 and March 2022. On Tuesday Ofgem published the additional allowance with benchmark consumption calculations as £23.69. Using new TDCV values the allowance is £23.14.
  5. From 1 October the equivalent per unit level of the price cap to the nearest pence for a typical customer paying by direct debit will be 19p per kWh for electricity customers and 3p per kWh for gas customers. 
  6. Suppliers buy electricity and gas on the wholesale markets in advance, purchasing ‘forward contracts’ gradually over time. The default tariff price reflects suppliers’ costs because we use the wholesale prices of the relevant forward contracts that were sold in advance during an ‘observation window’ before each six-month price cap period.  The observation window for the summer price cap period (April – September) is the previous August – January. The observation window for the winter price cap period (October – March) is the previous February – July.  The graphs below show a) how wholesale gas and electricity prices for the relevant contracts on offer in each observation window result in an allowance that reflects suppliers’ average costs: 
  7. Ofgem analysis at the time the default tariff cap was introduced on 1 January 2019 suggests that the default tariff price cap would have reduced the price of the average standard variable tariffs from the six largest suppliers by around £75 to £100 per year since April 2015 had it been in place over this period. The research shows suppliers have consistently charged more than the indicative level of the default tariff cap, which reflects the estimated costs of an efficient supplier. This analysis suggests had the cap not been introduced on 1 January 2019, customers would be paying significantly more. However, it is impossible to estimate an exact savings figure going forward as suppliers can no longer price above the level of the cap. Information and materials for consumers about the price caps is available at: www.ofgem.gov.uk/energy-price-caps.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Further information

Am I on the best tariff with my supplier? Am I on the best tariff with my supplier? Am I on the best tariff with my supplier? Am I on the best tariff with my supplier? Am I on the best tariff with my supplier?

business electricity business gas

Assumption About Smart Meters

All energy suppliers aim to install smart meters in 85% of homes and small businesses in England, Wales and Scotland by 2024.

However, due to 1/5 reporting issues due to poor outsourcing of parts, this might be delayed until 2035.
This initiative has zero value in helping the public and business. It simply allows utilities to identify the usage driving past the property or site, then turn off the meter off-site.

There is nothing presently smart about it with present defect issues and sidestep current Ofgem policies on cutting-off customers.

Smart meter stems from copying the name from Smart grid. The utility company should have called it Super-Meter and called it fancy over and over again whilst ignoring the present defects.

For smart-grid to occur, innovative consumer units are required that can turn off specific fuses and circuit breakers of properties. This will assist during utility shortages and blackouts.

Present misconceptions

“Smart meter is compulsory” – Incorrect, they are not compulsory, and Ofgem agrees.

“Suppliers are required by their licence to take all reasonable steps to roll out smart meters to all domestic and microbusiness customers by 2020” – Incorrect. Suppliers use the licence stance to roll out meters when this licence keeps meters in good working order. Ofgem is still discussing the question of compulsory meters.

“If you don’t want to have a smart meter now, you will still be able to have one installed at a later date” – Incorrect. Costs recovered through the utility price, network cost, or even a maintenance operation cost.
“Ofgem and government have discussed the benefits” – Incorrect. Ofgem identified poor outsourcing of parts, defective meters, and screen problems.

“The devices work well” – Incorrect. Evidence shows that more than 11% of smart meters stopped functioning correctly, or meter readings were complex. Energy supplier could not read the meter at 9%, 6% IHS will not connect or stopped working. 5% IHDs stopped working at distances from meters, 2% of meters do not work with solar panels, and 1% have inaccurate bills.

Link 1 – Ofgem – A guide provided by Ofgem relating to the smart meter

Link 2 – Which Magazine

Where are “smart meters” from?

Smart meter term is derived from copying the research name smart grid, which the network, utility companies, Ofgem, and the Government discussed heavily. This relates to dealing with blackouts due to utility shortages. The meter has nothing to do with smart grid. Smart grid relates to the consumer unit (fuse box) in the property, a Smart Consumer unit. This Smart Consumer unit will shut off all non-essential electrical appliance, leaving on fridges, and medical equipment on. Primary role of meter is to shut down the meter from outside the property. Poverty meter is the correct name.

Correspondence between Energy4 and OfGem. Energy4 Saving Businesses Money.

Request A Call Today For Further Information
Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW
Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4
Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816
Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

business electricity business gas

Can I change my energy provider, Yes. All businesses can change utility provide that operates within the UK based on locality, credit history, and capacity. Specific Green Energy suppliers and Local CHP suppliers can only supply to local customers

However, business customers must:

  • Provide your business address
    – The current name of your supplier
    – Annual Consumption (kW)
    – Business registration (Private Limited, Sole-trader, PLC, etc.,)
  • Complete Letter Of Authority (LOA)
  • Contract End Date (CED)
  • Termination notice period
  • Energy quote from Energy4
  • Switch energy supplier or renew present supplier / change utility provider
  • Energy contract submitted
  • Energy contract processed
  • Previous energy supplier can reject transfer
  • New energy supplier can reject contract
  • Confirm switch of energy supplier

Ofgem establishes road map to make switching easier for consumers

A fast and reliable switching process can encourage consumers to engage in the energy market, and make companies work harder to meet their needs. We have reviewed the switching process and identified changes that could deliver fast, potentially next day, transfers and improve the reliability of the process for consumers. We will consult in March on longer term changes that build on smart metering.
However, we believe that improvements must start now. Ofgem is therefore proposing to tighten up the current rules to secure a reliable three-week switch (after any cooling off arrangements)1 while reforms are being developed.
Government has recently asked the industry to see what changes could be made in the short term to speed up the switching process. We welcome the focus that government is bringing to this area. We will provide support to industry’s response and are challenging them to deliver as soon as possible.

Current rules on switching

Can I change my energy provider, over 5 million switches took place in the last year. When a consumer decides to switch supplier, they should have confidence that the switch will be fast, reliable and straightforward.
New rules brought in across Europe, require that a switch should take three weeks at most (after any cooling off period that the consumer may have). Our figures show that only eight out of ten domestic switches in Great Britain hit this target in electricity and that this drops to less than two in ten for the gas market.
Changes to the systems that support gas switching, approved by Ofgem and implemented last month, should enable a significant improvement to performance in gas. However, it is clear that greater focus is needed by suppliers if the target is to be met for all switches. We will continue to monitor how suppliers perform against this standard.

About our review

Can I change my energy provider has been discussed by OfGem. Between May and October this year, Ofgem led a detailed review of the end-to-end switching process with consumer bodies, government and industry. Many of these arrangements
have been in place since competition started in the late 90’s and need to be updated to take advantage of new technology and the roll out of smart meters.

Through our review we identified changes that can be implemented in the short term to improve speed and reliability.
This review has also informed the more ambitious proposals, that we will consult on next year, to deliver reliable and fast, eg next day, transfers. We have now published a detailed summary
of our review.

What consumers told us

We conducted qualitative research with both domestic and business consumers about their experiences and what they want from a new change of supplier process.
Overall, domestic consumers said that they were most concerned about the earlier stages of the switching process, such as choosing the best deal for them. When asked to
think about the change of supplier process, consumers said they wanted a reliable and accurate transfer and for it to be as efficient and streamlined as possible.
For some business consumers, a faster switch was felt to have benefits. However, their primary concern was for the transfer to be reliable. A number of businesses raised concerns about the objections process – where a supplier can block the switch in certain circumstances.

Securing improvements for consumers now

Our consumer research shows that reliability is currently the number one priority for consumers. We have identified changes that should be made now to secure a reliable three
week switch for consumers while industry drives forward work to make switching faster.
We are now:
• Consulting on tougher rules, to be implemented as soon as possible next year, that would require suppliers to switch all consumers within three weeks (after any cooling off period)
• Consulting on tougher rules to make sure companies transfer the right consumer or face penalties if they do not
• Looking to put certain practices under the microscope by stepping up our monitoring, including supplier behaviour in blocking a switch in certain circumstances.
It is vital that consumers can have confidence in the transfer process and we want industry to communicate clearly what should happen when a consumer decides to switch. Energy
UK, the trade association that includes the large domestic energy suppliers, shares our ambition to introduce a switching guarantee for consumers and will consider this in line with
the improvements that suppliers are currently developing to achieve faster switching. Energy UK has also agreed to review its current billing code of practice to ensure that it meets
consumers’ needs when they switch supplier.

Supporting the industry’s work to speed up the switching process in the short term

Through our ongoing retail market reforms, Ofgem is introducing new rules to make the market simpler, clearer and fairer, so that consumers can identify the best deal for them.
Suppliers need to go further to rebuild consumers’ trust by introducing changes that improve both the reliability and speed of the transfer process.
In response to the government’s push for faster switching, suppliers are assessing the output of our review of the switching process to identify changes that allow consumers
to switch more quickly than today. We are working with industry on this initiative to ensure that it delivers the right outcome for consumers. We are challenging the industry to
deliver a faster switching process as quickly as possible.

Longer term improvements to the switching process

Review suggests that, by building on the roll-out of smart metering, we can go even further on switching timescales so that domestic and business consumers could move to their new supplier the next day, or even on the same day.
These changes, in particular introducing a new central switching service that brings together the existing services in gas and electricity, could improve the reliability and efficiency of the transfer process for consumers and bring down costs.
This could also streamline the process for dual fuel consumers. To support our analysis, we have asked industry for information on how much it will cost to make these changes and
what the wider benefits would be. We will consult on these reforms, with a full impact assessment of the costs and benefits, in March 2014. We will then introduce any changes as early as possible.

Request A Call Today For Further Information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Ofgem information

Further information from Ofgem

business electricity business gas

Can my energy supplier cut me off No. Can my energy supplier cut me off, only if you have not paid a bill after 28 days. Your supplier may contact you about the possibility of disconnecting your gas or electricity supply. It’s rare to be disconnected as your supplier will usually offer to install a prepayment meter instead. Before supplier can disconnect your energy supply, your supplier must give you a chance to pay your debt through a payment plan. If you haven’t already, you should talk to your supplier about your repayment options. Coronavirus Coronavirus – if you’ve been told you’ll be disconnected At the moment, your energy supplier won’t disconnect your gas or electricity if you miss a payment. Contact the consumer helpline if your supplier says they’ll disconnect you. If you’ve got a prepayment meter and you don’t top it up, your energy supply might still stop. Check what you can do if you can’t top up your meter. If you haven’t paid a bill after 28 days, your supplier may contact you about the possibility of disconnecting your gas or electricity supply. It’s rare to be disconnected as your supplier will usually offer to install a prepayment meter instead. Before they disconnect you, your supplier must give you a chance to pay your debt through a payment plan. If you haven’t already, you should talk to your supplier about your repayment options. Who shouldn’t be disconnected Suppliers aren’t allowed to disconnect you between 1 October and 31 March if you’re: a pensioner living alone a pensioner living with children under five The 6 largest suppliers have signed up to an agreement to make sure you won’t be disconnected at any time of year if you have: a disability long-term health problems severe financial problems young children living at home These suppliers are British Gas, EDF Energy, npower, E.on, Scottish Power and SSE. Other suppliers should also take your situation into account, but they’re not obliged to. In this case “Can my energy supplier cut me off” Yes. Find another utility supplier. If you’ve been threatened with being disconnected but think you shouldn’t be, contact your supplier and let them know. They should visit your home to check on your situation before they do anything. You can make a complaint if they decide to go ahead and disconnect you. The disconnection process If you don’t come to an agreement with your supplier to pay off your debt, they can apply to a court for a warrant to enter your home to disconnect your supply. Your supplier must send a notice telling you they’re applying to the court. Before the hearing takes place, contact your supplier and try and come to an agreement to pay off your debt. If you haven’t contacted your supplier, there’ll be a court hearing which you should attend. You can still come to an arrangement with your supplier to pay off your debt at this stage. You can take along a friend for support. If the court grants a warrant, your supplier will be able to disconnect your supply. They must give you 7 days notice in writing before they do. In practice, it’s rare for suppliers to disconnect customers. They’re more likely to fit a prepayment meter in your home. Your supplier won’t need a warrant to disconnect a meter on the outside of your property (as the warrant is to enter your property), but most suppliers will still get one. If you have a ‘smart meter’ If you have a smart energy meter in your home, your supplier could potentially disconnect your supply remotely without needing to access to your meter. However, before they do this, they must have: contacted you to discuss options for repaying your debt, eg through a repayment plan visited your home to assess your personal situation and whether this would affect you being disconnected, eg if you’re disabled or elderly If they don’t do this and they try and disconnect you, make a complaint to your supplier. Getting reconnected If your supply has been disconnected, contact your supplier to arrange reconnection. You will need to arrange to pay your debt, the reconnection fee and administrative costs. The amount you’ll be charged depends on your supplier, but it must be reasonable. If you think the charges are too high, get advice from the Citizens Advice consumer helpline. You may have to pay your supplier a security deposit as a condition of giving you a supply. You can’t be asked for a security deposit if you have a prepayment meter installed. If you’ve paid all the charges your supplier must reconnect you within 24 hours – or within 24 hours of the start of the next working day if you make payment out of working hours. If you can’t pay all the charges at once, you can ask your supplier if they’re willing to agree a repayment plan with you. If they do agree then they should reconnect you within 24 hours. If the supplier doesn’t reconnect you within 24 hours they have to pay you £30 compensation. They must do this within 10 working days. They’ll usually credit your account, but you can ask them to pay you by cheque or bank transfer. If they don’t pay on time they have to pay you an extra £30 for the delay. If you’re disconnected because your energy supply is interrupted, you might be able to claim compensation. Energy supply disconnection and prepayment meter rules At one time or another many people experience difficulties paying their bills. If you get into debt with your gas or electricity supplier it’s very important to tackle the problem. If you let your energy bills build up, there is a risk of eventually being disconnected – which means having your energy cut off – by your supplier. Here we explain the rules, what should happen if you are disconnected and the help available to you to get reconnected. Debt and prepayment meters If you don’t engage with your supplier on a debt and 28 days pass, they can contact you about the possibility of disconnecting your energy supply. Your supplier must give you the chance to repay the money you owe through a payment plan before they disconnect you. The plan must factor in your financial circumstances and ability to pay. Debts can be repaid over a number of months as you also continue to pay for your ongoing energy use. It’s rare that customers are disconnected. Usually your supplier will ask to fit a prepayment meter, also referred to as a ‘key card’ or ‘token’ meter, in your home. They work in a similar way to a pay-as-you-go phone. You don’t have to have one if you don’t want one. Ask your supplier about your options. Find out more in Understand your energy meter. If you don’t engage with your supplier to agree how to resolve the debt, or fail to stick to an agreed payment plan, they can also install a prepayment meter under a warrant to recover the money you owe. They can only do this as a last resort and must send you a notice telling you they’re applying to the court. Who can’t be disconnected? If you are threatened with disconnection there are strict rules on who can or can’t be disconnected. If you’re eligible for the Priority Services Register Suppliers are prohibited from disconnecting a premises occupied by a customer eligible for the Priority Services Register during the winter months (1 October – 31 March). You’re eligible for the Priority Services Register if you: are of pensionable age are disabled or chronically sick have a long-term medical condition have a hearing or visual impairment or additional communication needs are in a vulnerable situation. If you’re a ‘Safety Net’ vulnerable consumer Many suppliers have also signed up to a Safety Net, a pledge to never knowingly disconnect a vulnerable customer at any time of year. This offers further protection for vulnerable customers. In this instance, vulnerable customers may be customers who are unable to safeguard their personal welfare or the personal welfare of other members of the household due to: age (such as younger people at home) health disability severe financial insecurity. If you’re bankrupt or you owe debts to a former energy supplier You cannot be disconnected if: your debt is owed to a previous supplier you have been made bankrupt and the debt relates to a period before you went bankrupt the debt is not for the gas or electricity you have used but for some other service or appliance you have bought from your supplier. If you think you shouldn’t be disconnected, contact your supplier and tell them. If you aren’t happy with their response, follow their complaints process and make a complaint. Get help to repay a debt and avoid disconnection Specific help is available if you have either been threatened with disconnection or who have actually been disconnected: Further support can also be found in our section on Who to contact if it’s difficult paying energy bills. Fuel Direct It may be also possible to repay an energy debt through a scheme called Fuel Direct. You are eligible for this scheme if you get: income support job seeker’s allowance pension credits employment and support allowance. Through Fuel Direct, a fixed sum will be automatically deducted every week from your benefits and paid directly to your energy supplier. This will cover your current fuel use and also pay off a certain amount of your debt. Find out more on GOV.UK: Help paying bills using your benefits (opens another website) Reconnection To get reconnected after a disconnection, contact your supplier. There may be costs and charges involved. Your supplier will explain them. If you experience temporary disconnection because of a power cut, Dial 105, You might be able to claim compensation from your network operator under the Guaranteed Standards. Consumer protections Ofgem is working to deliver changes to protect consumers from experiencing more debt or hardship due to prepayment meter warrant installations. Under current rules, suppliers can charge warrant costs back to you. The charges, which can include court costs, can range between £200 to £900. We’re consulting on plans to place a firm cap at £100 or £150 on warrant charges for all customers. We’re also proposing to ban warrant charges altogether, and in some cases installations, for the most vulnerable customers. This includes people in financial hardship, and people with physical and mental health issues and learning difficulties. Remember, if you are threatened with disconnection it is important to act quickly and try and reach a financial arrangement that is acceptable to both you and your supplier. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information 1 Further information 2 Further information 3 Information 4 Information 5 Information 6 Information 7 Information 8 Information 9 Further information 10 Can my energy supplier cut me off Can my energy supplier cut me off Can my energy supplier cut me off Can my energy supplier cut me off Can my energy supplier cut me off Can my energy supplier cut me off business electricity business gas
Can my energy supplier stop me switching, NO. Ofgem is clamping down on suppliers that have been blocking services that automatically switch customers to cheaper energy deals with rival companies. Bulb, First Utility, and OneSelect have all been found guilty of blocking switches made through automatic switching services, such as Flipper and Switched. No fines have been dished out, as yet, but the energy regulator has ordered these suppliers to stop. Can my energy supplier stop my switching, if the following occurs; Switching energy supplier is surprisingly simple, and once you’ve agreed a new deal, you should be with your new supplier in just 17 days, which includes a 14-day cooling-off period. But there are some instances when you’re current supplier can legitimately block your move to a new one, and you might be stopped if: You owe your supplier money If you have an outstanding energy debt with your current supplier, and the money has been owed 28 days or more, then your move can be blocked until this debt has been paid. Suppliers could insist on installing the currently unreliable and complaints covered Smart Meter and Prepayment Meter. If you have a prepayment meter installed, you can switch supplier unless you owe more than £500 for gas or £500 for electricity. When you switch, you’ll need to ask the new supplier to agree to transfer your debt along with your supply (this is called the ‘Debt Assignment Protocol’). If you’ve owed money for less than 28 days, you can still switch supplier, but be aware that the debt will be added onto your final bill. If you decide to switch because your supplier is putting up its prices, you’ll have 30 days to pay off the debt before they can block your switch. And if the debt has built up because of a mistake by your supplier, such as a billing error, you can still switch and the debt will be added onto your final bill. If you already have a prepayment meter installed, you can switch supplier unless you owe more than £500 for gas or £500 for electricity. When you switch, you’ll need to ask the new supplier to agree to transfer your debt along with your supply (this is called the ‘Debt Assignment Protocol’). You’re on an unsupported meter If you’re on a prepayment meter, or have a Economy 7 or 10 meter installed, you might not be able to switch if the new supplier or tariff doesn’t support those types of meter, else have standard meter installed, which your new supplier might charge you for. You live in rented property If you live in rented or shared accommodation, you may not be able to switch without permission from the property owner or whoever’s name is on the bill. If you are responsible for paying the energy bills at the property, and the bills are in your name, then you have the right to choose your supplier. What if your supplier is stopping you from switching? If none of the above applies to you, and your supplier is blocking your switch even though you’re entitled to transfer to another supplier, you’ll need to make a complaint. Customers haven’t encountered the problems that have beset some customers using automatic switching services, but even though Ofgem is ironing out these issues, automatic switching has some additional problems. What’s the problem with automatic switching? Energy4 has helped many companies  switch to a better deal for over a decade now, and the process couldn’t be simpler. Contact energy4 today for a quote. Enter a couple more details on your current energy deal and annual usage – if you don’t have this to hand, we can run a comparison based upon the size and type of property you live in – and we’ll show you a list of deals that could potentially knock hundreds off your annual energy bills. You just then pick the deal that’s right for you, and we take care of the rest. It really is that simple. Information you need It’s useful to have the following information: Your postcode. The name of your current supplier. The name of your current energy tariff. Your annual energy usage or costs. You can find your tariff, supplier and annual information on a recent energy bill. Log into your online account if you don’t get paper bills. If you aren’t sure about your current supply details, see Finding your energy supplier or network operator. Find tariffs and suppliers Use a comparison website or phone different energy suppliers to find out what you can save by switching. You can ask your supplier if they will match an offer if you find one that’s better elsewhere. Weigh up your options Think about things like: A supplier’s customer service. If the offer is the cheapest, environmentally-friendly or flexible to leave without an exit fee. If you can get cashback or other free incentives as part of your switch offer. If there is a switching guarantee. Some suppliers offer this to help you switch with confidence. Choosing tariffs Learn about different energy tariffs See how suppliers compare on customer service View suppliers offering an Energy Switch Guarantee Confirm your switch The last step is to confirm your contract and payment method. Paying by Direct Debit usually saves money. Your new supplier will contact you with a switching date. It can take up to 21 days to complete a switch. In most cases, it’s around 17 days. If you change your mind You have 14 days to cancel from when you agree to a contract. Help with switching If a switch goes wrong or is unexpected Read less You could have been wrongly switched if you get an unexpected welcome letter or final energy bill. It’s rare this happens. When it does, contact your supplier to tell them. Citizens Advice can help with what you need to do too. Most switches run smoothly. But if things go wrong, Ofgem’s Guaranteed Standards make sure things are put right quickly and you are compensated. Compensation You won’t need to do anything if suppliers breach a standard and spot the issue. Compensation is automatic. You can report a claim too. Suppliers have 10 working days from a breach to pay you. They could owe a further £30 if they don’t meet this timeline. Ofgem monitors supplier data to make sure they do this. If you think an issue isn’t fixed or you haven’t been compensated, it’s best to contact your supplier to tell them. If you aren’t happy with their response, make a complaint. Guaranteed standard Compensation* Suppliers agree if a switch is valid or Erroneous transfer within 20 working days of you telling either supplier. £60 (£30 from each supplier) Suppliers confirm the outcome of their investigation into an Erroneous transfer within 20 working days of you contacting them. £30 by contacted supplier Supplier restores connection to previous supplier within 21 working days of agreeing a switch is erroneous. £30 by former supplier Supplier refunds money owed on a credit balance within 10 working days of sending a final bill. £30 by former supplier Property switched by mistake. £30 by new supplier Switch completes within 15 working days. £30 by new supplier Supplier sends a final bill within six weeks of a switch. £30 by former supplier *Effective from 1 May 2019. Suppliers may contact you about making a compensation payment. Always ask for further information before giving your personal details. You won’t get switching compensation if you are a business energy customer or if your supplier has gone bust. Switching if you are repaying a debt Read less You can still switch if you’ve been in debt to your supplier for less than 28 days. Your old supplier will add any owed amounts to your final bill. You’ll need to repay a debt first if you’ve owed money for over 28 days. This differs for prepayment meter customers (see below). Your supplier can’t stop you from switching if it’s their fault you’re in debt. If you are having money difficulties, see our advice on help if you can’t afford your bills. Switching if you are repaying a debt with a prepayment meter Read less You can still switch with debts of up to £500 on gas and £500 on electricity. The supplier you switch to will take on the debt and you will repay them instead. This happens under a ‘Debt Assignment Protocol’. You will agree the terms of your repayment plan in your contract with them. Our rules mean repayment plans must be realistic and affordable for you. Prepayment meter tariffs are usually more expensive. You may want to ask about the different options available to you, including changing to a standard meter. Most suppliers offer this for free. If you are having money difficulties, see our advice on help if you can’t afford your bills. Our guide on prepayment meter rules could also help. Switching if you rent a property Read less Your rental agreement should say if you, your landlord or letting agent are responsible for energy bills. Consumer protection law says you must be able to choose your energy supplier if it is your responsibility to pay energy bills. Your landlord could be responsible for paying energy bills if they: pay the supplier directly and reclaim the money from you as a tenant include the cost of energy in your rent assume responsibility for energy supply between tenancies. Even then, they should not unreasonably stop you from switching. If they pay, it’s worth checking the Citizens Advice guide on what your landlord can charge for your energy too. It’s important to check your rental contract for: energy supplier clauses. Letting agents or landlords sometimes tie in preferred suppliers with a ‘default supplier clause’. Ask if you can renegotiate it. If you can’t, you can still switch if you are responsible for paying energy bills. notice and return clauses. These might mean you must first tell your landlord if you plan to switch supplier. You might also have to return supply back to a particular supplier or energy meter (if you changed meters) when your tenancy ends. If you have a prepayment meter If you have moved to a property with a prepayment meter, tell the supplier you are a new tenant quickly. This is to make sure you don’t take on a former tenant’s debt in your prepayment meter charges. Prepayment meter tariffs usually cost more. You may want to ask about different options, including changing to a smart or standard meter. Most suppliers offer meter change services for free. If you aren’t sure about your current supply details, see Finding your energy supplier or network operator. Sales calls and doorstep sellers: our tips Always ask for ID Read less Always ask a doorstep salesperson to show their ID and ask a telephone caller to say where they are calling from. Note: their name who they work for their contact details. Most sales people only sell for one supplier at a time. So they will only be able to offer you deals from that supplier. However, some switching sites are also piloting direct sales and may offer you deals from a range of suppliers. Don’t get pressured Read less Salespeople can be persuasive. They may have a good offer. But they should never try to rush or panic you into a contract. Ofgem has rules on companies selling you energy so they do it properly. If you give a salesperson information on your energy use, they must use this to calculate your quote estimate and comparison. In most circumstances, a salesperson must show you how their offer compares to your current supplier’s deal. All salespeople should summarise the important points of a contract. Ask for a copy of the terms and conditions. Take your time: Check facts and consider the details Discuss it with someone else (like family or friends) Ask yourself questions like: “Is this the best deal for me based on my own energy use?” “Do I have enough information to decide?” Be aware of misleading statements that some salespeople may use. For example: “We have been sent by Ofgem to save you money.” “We own the local power distribution network, so we’re the cheapest supplier.” Think before you say yes Read less Ofgem has rules on companies selling you energy so they do it properly. If you give a salesperson information on your energy use, they must use this to calculate your quote estimate and comparison. In most circumstances, a salesperson must show you how their offer compares to your current supplier’s deal. All salespeople should summarise the important points of a contract. Ask for a copy of the terms and conditions. Take your time: Check facts and consider the details Discuss it with someone else (like family or friends) Ask yourself questions like: “Is this the best deal for me based on my own energy use?” “Do I have enough information to decide?” Be aware of misleading statements that some salespeople may use. For example: “We have been sent by Ofgem to save you money.” “We own the local power distribution network, so we’re the cheapest supplier.” You have the right to cancel within 14 days of signing a contract. You don’t need to give a reason. Report pushy salespeople Read less If you think a salesperson has behaved inappropriately or you are worried you have been mis-sold an energy deal, call the energy company the salesperson works for. If you are unhappy with their response, make a complaint. The Energy Ombudsman can step in after 8 weeks. Citizens Advice can also advise on 0808 223 1133 or use their online web chat. For textphone, dial 18001 followed by the helpline number. Mis-sold energy and unwanted sales contact If you think you think you have been mis-sold an energy deal, contact the supplier to put it right. If you are unhappy with their response, make a complaint. If you think you are a victim of fraud or have been contacted by someone trying to scam you: Call Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or use their online form. In Scotland, call Police Scotland on 101. Always call 999 in an emergency, if you feel threatened or unsafe. For general advice on managing unwanted calls and messages, visit the Ofcom website. To manage unsolicited marketing and sales mailings, sign up for the Mailing Preference Service. The Trading Standards Office or the Trading Standard Service in Wales can advise on setting up ‘No Cold Calling Zones’ in your local area. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information 1 Can my energy supplier stop me switching Can my energy supplier stop me switching Can my energy supplier stop me switching Can my energy supplier stop me switching Can my energy supplier stop me switching business electricity business gas

Can my gas and electricity be with different suppliers YES, businesses can have ANY supplier they prefer based on cost, tariff, personal preference and locality.

Businesses NO LONGER need to acquire both gas and electricity from ONE supplier

Energy4 will provide you with a report, looking at your accounts and find out which options would be best for your business needs

However Businesses who have one Electrical connection that is separated into TWO meters across a site, both Electricity contracts must be with the same supplier.

Since 2013 Energy4 has noticed Utility providers are misinforming business owners that all Meters on a site must be with one supplier. This is incorrect.

Attempts have been used by Utility providers to prevent inaccurate information to business customers, especially quoting OfGem reports that are irrelevant, and in worse cases claiming it is a legal department issue if business customers do not agree that a supplier has access to all meters on a company property.

The large 6 have been identified as the worst perpetrators of misinforming business owners.

Making a complaint about your energy supplier or network operator

Talk to them
Energy suppliers and network operators must have a complaints process. They must also reply to complaints and come to a decision within 8 weeks.

Explain the problem and what you want them to do.

You can complain by email, letter or telephone.

Keep records of contact you have with the company.

You can find company contact details on a recent energy bill.

If aren’t sure about your current supply details, see Finding your energy supplier or network operator.

Get support
Citizens Advice has template complaints letters you can use. They can also help with a complaint. Sometimes their powers mean they can act for you.

Someone at their Extra Help Unit could take on your case if you are in a vulnerable situation or your energy could get cut off. They can also refer you to other organisations to help. This free service includes some support for small businesses.

Free online tools and apps like Resolver.co.uk can also help you track and manage a complaint step-by-step.

Contact

Call Citizens Advice on 0808 223 1133 or use their online webchat.
For textphone, dial 18001 followed by the helpline number.
Take it further
Complain to the Energy Ombudsman if eight weeks have passed and you still aren’t happy with the company’s response.

Energy companies should write to you to tell you how to do this at eight weeks or when you hit a ‘deadlock’. This is when neither of you can reach an agreement.

You can refer a case to the Ombudsman within 12 months of a deadlock letter. Sometimes they can investigate an older complaint if you have not had a deadlock letter.

The Ombudsman can make a company correct a problem, apologise and explain what happened. They can also make a company pay compensation. Its decisions are binding on the energy company.

Complain to Ofgem if you can’t resolve an issue with a network operator or a comparison website accredited by the Ofgem Confidence Code.

Contact

Energy Ombudsman complaints form or call 0330 440 1624.
Network operator and Ofgem Confidence Code comparison site complaints: Email Ofgem or call 020 7901 7295.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

 

Can my gas and electricity be with different suppliers

business electricity business gas

Can my utility supplier cut me off No. Only if you have not paid a bill after 28 days. Your supplier may contact you about the possibility of disconnecting your gas or electricity supply. It’s rare to be disconnected as your supplier will usually offer to install a prepayment meter instead. Before supplier can disconnect your utility supply, your supplier must give you a chance to pay your debt through a payment plan. If you haven’t already, you should talk to your supplier about your repayment options. Who shouldn’t be disconnected Suppliers aren’t allowed to disconnect you between 1 October and 31 March if you’re:
  • A pensioner living alone
  • Pensioner living with children under five
The 6 largest suppliers have signed up to an agreement to make sure you won’t be disconnected at any time of year if you have:
  • A disability
  • Long-term health problems
  • Severe financial problems
  • Young children living at home
These suppliers are British Gas, EDF Energy, npower, E.on, Scottish Power and SSE. Other suppliers should also take your situation into account, but they’re not obliged to. If you’ve been threatened with being disconnected but think you shouldn’t be, contact your supplier and let them know. They should visit your home to check on your situation before they do anything. You can make a complaint if they decide to go ahead and disconnect you. The disconnection process If you don’t come to an agreement with your supplier to pay off your debt, they can apply to a court for a warrant to enter your home to disconnect your supply. Your supplier must send a notice telling you they’re applying to the court. Before the hearing takes place, contact your supplier and try and come to an agreement to pay off your debt. If you haven’t contacted your supplier, there’ll be a court hearing which you should attend. You can still come to an arrangement with your supplier to pay off your debt at this stage. You can take along a friend for support. If the court grants a warrant, your supplier will be able to disconnect your supply. They must give you 7 days notice in writing before they do. In practice, it’s rare for suppliers to disconnect customers. They’re more likely to fit a prepayment meter in your home. Your supplier won’t need a warrant to disconnect a meter on the outside of your property (as the warrant is to enter your property), but most suppliers will still get one. If you have a ‘smart meter’ If you have a smart meter in your home, your supplier could potentially disconnect your supply remotely without needing to access to your meter. However, before they do this, they must have: contacted you to discuss options for repaying your debt, eg through a repayment plan visited your home to assess your personal situation and whether this would affect you being disconnected, eg if you’re disabled or elderly If they don’t do this and they try and disconnect you, make a complaint to your supplier. Getting reconnected If your supply has been disconnected, contact your supplier to arrange reconnection. You will need to arrange to pay your debt, the reconnection fee and administrative costs. The amount you’ll be charged depends on your supplier, but it must be reasonable. If you think the charges are too high, get advice from the Citizens Advice consumer helpline. You may have to pay your supplier a security deposit as a condition of giving you a supply. You can’t be asked for a security deposit if you have a prepayment meter installed. If you’ve paid all the charges your supplier must reconnect you within 24 hours – or within 24 hours of the start of the next working day if you make payment out of working hours. If you can’t pay all the charges at once, you can ask your supplier if they’re willing to agree a repayment plan with you. If they do agree then they should reconnect you within 24 hours. If the supplier doesn’t reconnect you within 24 hours they have to pay you £30 compensation. They must do this within 10 working days. They’ll usually credit your account, but you can ask them to pay you by cheque or bank transfer. If they don’t pay on time they have to pay you an extra £30 for the delay. If you’re disconnected because your utility supply is interrupted, you might be able to claim compensation. Utility supply disconnection and prepayment meter rules At one time or another many people experience difficulties paying their bills. If you get into debt with your gas or electricity supplier it’s very important to tackle the problem. If you let your utility bills build up, there is a risk of eventually being disconnected – which means having your utility cut off – by your supplier. Here we explain the rules, what should happen if you are disconnected and the help available to you to get reconnected. Debt and prepayment meters If you don’t engage with your supplier on a debt and 28 days pass, they can contact you about the possibility of disconnecting your utility supply. Your supplier must give you the chance to repay the money you owe through a payment plan before they disconnect you. The plan must factor in your financial circumstances and ability to pay. Debts can be repaid over a number of months as you also continue to pay for your ongoing utility use. It’s rare that customers are disconnected. Usually your supplier will ask to fit a prepayment meter, also referred to as a ‘key card’ or ‘token’ meter, in your home. They work in a similar way to a pay-as-you-go phone. You don’t have to have one if you don’t want one. Ask your supplier about your options. Find out more in Understand your utility meter. If you don’t engage with your supplier to agree how to resolve the debt, or fail to stick to an agreed payment plan, they can also install a prepayment meter under a warrant to recover the money you owe. They can only do this as a last resort and must send you a notice telling you they’re applying to the court. Who can’t be disconnected? If you are threatened with disconnection there are strict rules on who can or can’t be disconnected. If you’re eligible for the Priority Services Register Suppliers are prohibited from disconnecting a premises occupied by a customer eligible for the Priority Services Register during the winter months (1 October – 31 March). You’re eligible for the Priority Services Register if you: are of pensionable age are disabled or chronically sick have a long-term medical condition have a hearing or visual impairment or additional communication needs are in a vulnerable situation. If you’re a ‘Safety Net’ vulnerable consumer Many suppliers have also signed up to a Safety Net, a pledge to never knowingly disconnect a vulnerable customer at any time of year. This offers further protection for vulnerable customers. In this instance, vulnerable customers may be customers who are unable to safeguard their personal welfare or the personal welfare of other members of the household due to: age (such as younger people at home) health disability severe financial insecurity. If you’re bankrupt or you owe debts to a former utility supplier You cannot be disconnected if: your debt is owed to a previous supplier you have been made bankrupt and the debt relates to a period before you went bankrupt the debt is not for the gas or electricity you have used but for some other service or appliance you have bought from your supplier. If you think you shouldn’t be disconnected, contact your supplier and tell them. If you aren’t happy with their response, follow their complaints process and make a complaint. Get help to repay a debt and avoid disconnection Specific help is available if you have either been threatened with disconnection or who have actually been disconnected: Further support can also be found in our section on Who to contact if it’s difficult paying utility bills. Fuel Direct It may be also possible to repay an utility debt through a scheme called Fuel Direct. You are eligible for this scheme if you get: income support job seeker’s allowance pension credits employment and support allowance. Through Fuel Direct, a fixed sum will be automatically deducted every week from your benefits and paid directly to your utility supplier. This will cover your current fuel use and also pay off a certain amount of your debt. Find out more on GOV.UK: Help paying bills using your benefits (opens another website) Reconnection To get reconnected after a disconnection, contact your supplier. There may be costs and charges involved. Your supplier will explain them. If you experience temporary disconnection because of a power cut, Dial 105, You might be able to claim compensation from your network operator under the Guaranteed Standards. See Power cuts: Help and compensation under the Guaranteed Standards. Consumer protections Ofgem is working to deliver changes to protect consumers from experiencing more debt or hardship due to prepayment meter warrant installations. Under current rules, suppliers can charge warrant costs back to you. The charges, which can include court costs, can range between £200 to £900. We’re consulting on plans to place a firm cap at £100 or £150 on warrant charges for all customers. We’re also proposing to ban warrant charges altogether, and in some cases installations, for the most vulnerable customers. This includes people in financial hardship, and people with physical and mental health issues and learning difficulties. Remember, if you are threatened with disconnection it is important to act quickly and try and reach a financial arrangement that is acceptable to both you and your supplier. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information 1 Further information 2 Information 3 Information 4 Information 5 Information 6 Information 7 Information 8 Further information 9

Can my utility supplier cut me off Can my utility supplier cut me off Can my utility supplier cut me off Can my utility supplier cut me off Can my utility supplier cut me off Can my utility supplier cut me off

business electricity business gas
Can you source Renewable Energy suppliers – YES. Energy4 have a selection of suppliers to cater for your needs depending on your locality. Due to the increased number of renewable energy programs coming on stream, and the higher payback periods, renewable utility prices are becoming more and more competitive. How will my business benefit from your services?
  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 40+ utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Can you source Renewable Energy suppliers business electricity business gas
Choosing Energy4 Why is it best to choose our services rather than doing it myself?
  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 27 utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Choosing Energy4 Choosing Energy4 Choosing Energy4 Choosing Energy4 Choosing Energy4 business electricity business gas

Council community switch is when a business or broker offers special prices to domestic customers by bringing many domestic customers together, with this large demand they can apply leverage to the network to provide much more competitive prices.

This Council Community switch is also refrred to as the Big Switch, Area Community Switch, Switch Together, Large Switch.

Energy4 has monitored domestic community switch for a while. After collecting information on the price of standing charge, and unit charge offered it has been found that there is no difference between the price offered by a domestic community switch and the price supplied by the noted supplier on there website. Energy4 did not identify a benefit.

Domestic customers should remain vigilant, and check the supply price being offered by the switch against what the supplier can provide. Switch should provide better prices, but Energy4 has yet to find any witch group who can provide evidence that this has actually happened.

Commercial collective switching does provide benefits, and placing sites and factories together has provided better prices for many Energy4 customers.

Benefits for communities and schools
Additional benefits are available for community organisations and education providers on the FIT scheme. These are for generators who have applied through pre-registration and status verification.

These benefits include:

A relaxation of the minimum energy efficiency requirement to level G and above (instead of level D and above), for non-domestic solar PV community energy and school installations to receive the higher generation tariff rate. This applies to installations with capacities up to 250kW Declared Net Capacity (DNC).
An additional six months to the ROO-FIT preliminary accreditation validity period for solar PV and non-PV installations owned by community organisations, for applications made between 1 April and 1 October 2015 and from 8 February 2016.
Two installations can share a single grid connection providing that at least one is owned by a community organisation. This is only applicable from 1 April 2015.
For applications made before 1 October 2015, a ‘tariff guarantee’ was also available for community organisations planning to commission non-domestic solar PV installations that will not exceed 50kW DNC.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Further information

Further information 2

business electricity business gas

Council community switch is when a business or broker offers special prices to domestic customers by bringing many domestic customers together, with this large demand they can apply leverage to the network to provide much more competitive prices.

This Council Community switch is also refrred to as the Big Switch, Area Community Switch, Switch Together, Large Switch.

Energy4 has monitored domestic community switch for a while. After collecting information on the price of standing charge, and unit charge offered it has been found that there is no difference between the price offered by a domestic community switch and the price supplied by the noted supplier on there website. Energy4 did not identify a benefit.

Domestic customers should remain vigilant, and check the supply price being offered by the community switch against what the supplier can provide. Community switch should provide better prices, but Energy4 has yet to find any community switch group who can provide evidence that this has actually happened.

Commercial collective switching does provide benefits, and placing sites and factories together has provided better prices for many Energy4 customers.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

business electricity business gas

Court summons for a disputed energy supplier bill Energy4 can help with this. Depending on how far the process has progressed we might be able to intervene.  We will investigate to see if all the correct procedures have been followed. Energy supplier will have applied to the Magistrate’s Court to have your meter disconnected. To help prevent progression to a court summons make sure you contact us at: contact@energy4.co.uk If you receive any demand from your energy supplier, the quicker we can assess the situation the easier it is to be able to start negotiations where appropriate. Agree a payment plan Contact your supplier as soon as you can if you are worried about paying your energy bills. Suppliers must work with you to agree on a payment plan you can afford under Ofgem rules. This includes reviewing a plan you have agreed before. You can ask for: a review of your payments and debt repayments payment breaks or reductions more time to pay access to hardship funds Priority Service registration – a free support service if you are in a vulnerable situation. If you can’t agree on a way to pay, get help from Citizens Advice. Someone at their Extra Help Unit could take on your case if you are in a vulnerable situation. Call OfGem 0808 223 1133 or use their online webchat. For OfGem textphone, dial 18001 followed by the helpline number. Check schemes, grants and benefits From suppliers Many energy companies offer schemes or grants to help with home heating and energy costs. For example, by making your home more energy-efficient or offering free boiler checks and upgrades. You don’t have to be a customer to join some of these schemes. Citizens Advice lists grants some larger suppliers offer. Talk to your supplier about grants and schemes they run too. From the government You might qualify for the: Winter Fuel Payment – a £100 to £300 fuel payment for people born on or before 5 October 1954. Cold Weather Payment – a £25 payment for every 7 days of very cold weather between November and March. Warm Home Discount – a £140 discount for some people getting Pension Credit or some people in low-income households. The government’s Fuel Direct Scheme can also help you repay a debt from benefit payments. Contact Jobcentre Plus (or your pension centre if you’re on Pension Credit) to apply. Let’s Talk has a benefits eligibility checker. It includes benefits guidance if you’re affected by the coronavirus. From charities Let’s Talk has information on grants some charities offer and how to apply. Turn2Us has grants search and adviser locator tools. Get debt advice You can find advice on managing debt problems and budgeting through the: Money Advice Service National Debtline StepChange Debt Charity Start by working out which debts you need to deal with first. Priority debts are ones that can cause serious problems if you can’t do anything about them. They include things like your energy bills, rent or mortgage and council tax. You can learn more about working out priority and other debts on the Citizens Advice website. Their budgeting tool can also help you manage your finances. Other tips Check if you can cut costs by switching from your current energy tariff or supplier. Change the payment method for your bills if you can. Direct Debit is usually cheaper. Use the Simple Energy Advice calculator to see how you can improve your energy efficiency, including the Green Deal. You can also learn about schemes run by your local council. Energy efficiency improvements cover things like home heating, free boiler replacement and roof insulation. You can also call Simple Energy Advice if you’re in England or Wales, or Home Energy Scotland if you’re in Scotland. Simple Energy Advice: 0800 444 202 Home Energy Scotland: 0808 808 2282 Court summons for a disputed energy supplier bill Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Information from OfGem business electricity business gas

Do energy prices vary YES, The wholesale price of gas and electricity is not easily predictable and continually fluctuates influenced by world events and the supply and demand of the world’s producers and consumers

Fluctuating wholesale prices mean that the price of gas and electricity offered to UK commercial customers by the 15 or so supply companies is never the same

By constantly monitoring the changes in the energy market, we can help the customer identify the most competitive gas and electricity prices for an individual business or site

Do energy prices vary, and does the price cap affect me?
The energy price cap is backstop protection from the government, calculated by Ofgem.

It applies if you’re on a default energy tariff, whether you pay by direct debit, standard credit or a prepayment meter.

It won’t apply if you:

  • Are on a fixed-term energy tariff
  • Have chosen a standard variable green energy tariff Ofgem has exempted from the cap.
    You can call your supplier to check if you are on their default tariff. If you’re not on one, you’re probably already paying a better rate for your energy. But it’s still worth checking if you could save more by switching.

The price cap limits the rates a supplier can charge for their default tariffs. These include the standing charge and price for each kWh of electricity and gas (the units your bill is calculated from).

Ofgem sets the cap level for summer and winter based on the underlying costs to supply energy. This keeps prices fair and makes sure suppliers reflect any drops in costs in your rates.

Will my bills fall or rise under the price cap?

The price cap won’t limit your total bill if you are on a default tariff.

The cap level we set depends on costs in the energy market. So your bills could go down or up.

Different factors also affect how much suppliers change their prices (the rate they charge you) to meet the cap:

  • Where you live
  • How you pay (prepayment, direct debit or standard credit)
  • Your type of energy meter.
  • Your energy usage will affect your total bill too.

It’s best to contact your supplier for personalised information on your tariff.

Any figures you may see in the media aren’t guaranteed. They also usually show a customer with ‘typical’ energy usage who pays by direct debit. So what you pay could be more or less than what’s reported.

What next?

Your supplier must automatically apply the price cap Ofgem sets if you are on a default tariff. That’s right so you get a fair price, but it won’t mean you’re on the cheapest deal. Shop around to see if you can get a better tariff.

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Information from OfGem

business electricity business gas

Do I agree to a verbal contract, No.

Never agree any Verbal contract over the telephone with any supplier / energy broker.

Request the contract standing charge and unit rates be emailed to you or send by letter. This benefits you as the business customer especially for legal reasons.

Verbal contracts can be falsified. In our experience this only benefits the supplier and often means an in-depth process has not been fully completed to support your business.

You can have confidence that Energy 4 will always provide you with all the options, advice and recommendations to make an informed and systematic decision based on facts and evidence provided.

Commercial collective switching does provide benefits, and placing sites and factories together has provided better prices for many Energy4 customers.

Energy4 offer a number of suppliers, who will accept contracts signed.

We use a well established contract signature process as many suppliers refuse to access verbal systems as a form of agreement for contract. This is because written contracts are still covered under Law, which are legally binding. Furthermore Banks demand that written information be performed on contracts in reference to the addition of Banking information for direct debits. This relates to Insurance and the HM Treasury that protects Banks and Consumers.

DO NOT agree anything over the telephone.

Large quantity of fraud occurs due to mis-selling contracts, agreeing one thing on the the telephone, and then altering the contract structure of standing charges, and unit values. If a supplier does not provide a contract by email, and demands signature within 10 minutes walk away.

True and False

  1. Verbal contracts are legally binding – Incorrect, only the director can agree the contract for utility contracts, or the legal registered owner. Evidence must also be provided in email or letter of what was agreed including evidence that the identity of the caller has been identified.
  2. Can save an organisation time and be efficient in the short term – Incorrect, Verbal contracts are the largest point of contention, and fraud at present perpetrated against businesses. 

Verbal contracts are Costly if criminal activity is involved, and problematic for business.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Information

Do I agree to a verbal contract

business electricity business gas

Do you work with over energy suppliers No. Energy4 does not work directly with other energy suppliers.

Energy4, is a TPI (Third Party Intermediate), Not a sales consultant or sales contractor working on-behalf or for a specific energy supplier

Energy4 provides an non bias service that is client focused, supplying clients with all the energy utility options available

Energy4 receives commission from any supplier that your business decides to selects, based on price, tariff or personal preference

Energy4 does not add, Secondary and Third charges to your bill. If this is found, please contact Energy4.

The supplier that your business decides to selects will not place, Secondary and Third charges to your bill on our behalf. If this is found, please contact Energy4.

How will my business benefit from your services?

  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 40+ utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

 

Do you work with over energy suppliers Do you work with over energy suppliers Do you work with over energy suppliers Do you work with over energy suppliers Do you work with over energy suppliers Do you work with over energy suppliers

business electricity business gas

Energy supplier confirms I am on the best tariff for my usage! how can I be sure

DO NOT take tariff information from only one supplier, It may the best tariff that your current supplier can offer, but not necessarily the best on the market to meet your needs

Never discuss your tariff with only one supplier. Energy4 on your behalf, can check ALL suppliers for the best deals

The truth is that many suppliers have provide incorrect information to customers, this can be found via Ofgem

Energy4 provides a quote, helpful, independent service to check your supplies, providing expert help you can trust

Am I on the best tariff with my supplier? You may be on a tariff with your supplier, however without evidence; you will not know this is the best tariff that your current supplier can offer. Suppliers will not quote other suppliers. Prices may not be necessarily the best on the market to meet your needs.

Why waste time checking with other suppliers when you can leave it all to Energy4? Our expert helps you can trust, with current energy market prices. The energy market is highly competitive, with prices and tariffs changing. Cheapest rates are constantly moving between energy suppliers, that includes the Big Six and others. It makes it difficult to say for sure which supplier is the most affordable.

Am I on the best tariff

Customers must allow Energy4 to prepare a compare energy supplier list. Allowing your tariff to slip from a fixed period contract to a variable one is one of the costliest moves to make in business. Be aware of when your current contract is coming to an end.

Energy4 helps business customers stay on top of the latest energy deals from all of our suppliers. Energy4 will provide lists, clearly identifying the cheapest energy supplier for you. Energy4 can offer energy savings alerts performing all the work, spending time searching for the best energy deals again.

Who is the best energy supplier depends on what’s important to you?

Is it the supplier who has the best ratings? Cheapest? Has the best ratings? Or is it the most environmentally friendly?

With all of these factors, we cannot say who the best energy supplier is. What we can do is present you with options to help you make the right choice for you. It’s important to understand that the energy market is constantly changing. New tariffs on the market, supplier ratings change, and greener energy sources are always in development. For this reason, it’s essential that you compare energy suppliers regularly.

Best Tariffs based on energy price cap

Energy price cap to increase in April but consumers should switch to save money

Big increase in wholesale energy prices push up price cap by £96 to £1,138 to pre-pandemic levels

The price cap continues to save consumers up to £100 a year and they can save up to £150 more by switching tariff

Support is available for those struggling to pay their energy bills, especially those in vulnerable circumstances

Ofgem has announced today that from 1 April 2021 the price cap will return to pre-pandemic levels, principally as a result of changes in wholesale energy prices.

When wholesale prices fell sharply last year in the wake of the first lockdown, the level of the price cap fell by £84 in October to its lowest level yet for the current winter period.

Demand for energy has since recovered which has pushed wholesale prices back up to more normal levels.

For six months from 1 April the price cap will increase by £96 to £1,138 for 11 million default tariff customers, and by £87 to £1,156 for 4 million pre-payment meter customers.

The price cap protects consumers who have not switched energy supplier by ensuring they pay a fair price for their electricity and gas.

Ofgem adjusts the level of the cap up or down twice a year to reflect the costs of supplying electricity and gas for suppliers.

Households on default tariffs are saving an estimated £75-£100 a year or £1 billion in total on their energy bills as a result.

Consumers who want to avoid the increase and save money should shop around ahead of the increase in the price cap on 1 April.

Jonathan Brearley, chief executive of Ofgem, said:

“Energy bill increases are never welcome, especially as many households are struggling with the impact of the pandemic. We have carefully scrutinised these changes to ensure that customers only pay a fair price for their energy.

“The price cap offers a safety net against poor pricing practices, saving customers up to £100 a year, but if they want to avoid the increase in April they should shop around for a cheaper deal.

“As the UK still faces challenges around COVID-19, during this exceptional time I expect suppliers to set their prices competitively, treat all customers fairly and ensure that any household in financial distress is given access to the support they need.

“The government and Ofgem have been working with the energy industry and consumer groups to support customers through this difficult time and I urge anyone worried about paying their energy bills to contact their supplier and access the help available.”

For the default tariff price cap level starting on 1 April, Ofgem has also allowed suppliers to claim £23 to cover higher levels of bad debt from more customers being unable to pay their energy bills due to the impact of COVID-19.

This will ensure suppliers can continue to supply energy and protect their customers, especially those in vulnerable circumstances.

Suppliers are required to provide emergency credit to customers struggling to top up their pre-payment meters, put those who are behind on their bills on affordable repayment plans and should not disconnect their customers.

Many have gone further in providing support over the last year, for example helping pre-payment meter customers who are shielding to top up.

Notes to editors

  1. Help available for consumers:

Ofgem rules require suppliers to offer emergency credit to pre-payment meter customers and put customers struggling to pay their energy bills on realistic and sustainable debt repayment plans based on their ability to pay.

If customers are struggling to pay for energy bills they should contact their energy supplier as soon as possible. Depending on their circumstances, customers may be eligible for extra help with their energy bills or services, such as payment breaks, suspending credit meter disconnections, and schemes like the Winter Fuel Payment or Warm Home Discount rebate.

The Citizens Advice consumer service can provide advice on how customers can resolve problems with their energy provider. For complex or urgent cases, or if a person is in a vulnerable situation they may then be referred onto the Extra Help Unit.

For help on how to switch to a better deal, see Ofgem’s guide.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Further information

Energy supplier confirms I am on the best tariff for my usage! how can I be sure Energy supplier confirms I am on the best tariff for my usage! how can I be sure Energy supplier confirms I am on the best tariff for my usage! how can I be sure

business electricity business gas

Energy suppliers are demanding large payments for back dated usage Yes, at Energy4 we can and we are very experienced in analysing and managing this type of situation, often to a favourable resolution for our clients Sometimes energy suppliers make mistakes and we are experts at identifying any errors to provide you with independent checks. We can confirm if the demand is valid, and if so, assist in negotiating appropriate terms to settle the outstanding amount Energy suppliers are demanding large payments for back dated usage can be discussed further It’s much easier to begin negotiations to a successful outcome earlier in the process so it’s best to contact us as soon as you’re aware of any issue Why do energy companies backdate payments? Energy companies backdate payments to get back any money they are owed by customers who have been underpaying for their energy. This is usually a problem for Business owners who have estimated energy bills, whereby suppliers best-guess your usage and charge you accordingly, and those who pay by Direct Debit. If, for instance, you pay a set amount of £80 each month, but your energy usage actually works out at £100 each month, then your energy supplier will be out of pocket by £20 a month, or £240 a year – in which case they’ll eventually come looking for the money they’re owed. This can come as a nasty surprise to customers, who can suddenly see their monthly payments hiked up for no apparent reason. A recent example of this was when Shell Energy tried to backdate a customer’s underpayments over the last five years, which saw their Direct Debit payments increase from £72 a month to £130 a month, even though the account had been £148 in credit. Thankfully for the customer, Ofgem regulations saw the Shell Energy customer’s Direct Debit amended and account refunded. But what are your rights if this happens to you? How long can an energy company backdate payments? Energy firms can only backdate energy bills for a maximum of 12 months, thanks to regulations introduced by Ofgem in 2019. This was to ensure that customers weren’t put in financial difficulty by energy payments they thought were up to date. Back bills are usually applied to accounts where suppliers need to estimate usage as they haven’t received regular meter readings. Once a firm has the readings, they might send a catch-up bill if the estimated charge was too low. Your energy company may be able to backdate bills past this 12 month cut off if you purposely prevent them from taking an accurate reading. What to do if your energy company tries to backdate your bills If your energy company sends you a backdated bill, the first thing you should do is check how far back the billing period stretches – you don’t have to pay for any energy use that stretches back more than 12 months. If the backdated bill is for the last 12 months only, then you need to make sure that what your energy supplier is claiming is correct. This means checking the meter readings displayed on the oldest bill in the 12 month period (if, for instance, you get a backdated bill in January 2020, you should check your bill from January 2019) and checking the meter readings on your latest bill. You should then check this against the latest readings on your meters – if they tally, then your supplier is right and you’ll need to pay up. If not, you should get in touch with your supplier and tell them what the issue is. It’s likely you’ll need to go through your supplier’s official complaints procedure to get the issue resolved. What are the back-billing rules? You can’t be charged for gas or electricity used more than 12 months ago if you have not been correctly billed for it before. Suppliers must make these terms clear in their contract terms and conditions. The rules apply to Business owner energy customers. They may not apply if you have behaved obstructively or unreasonably, preventing accurate billing. This could include:
  • Blocking meter readings at your property on more than one occasion
  • Stealing gas or electricity.
If you get a back bill Contact your supplier if you get a bill for energy usage that’s for more than a year ago. Explain that you understand you are protected by the back-billing rules. You should only be charged for up to your last 12 months’ energy use if you haven’t had an accurate bill in over a year. To help, use this Citizens Advice back billing example letter. Make a complaint if your supplier continues to ask for the full amount. If you haven’t had an energy bill in over a year To help your supplier send you accurate bills, try to:
  • Provide regular meter readings
  • Tell them when you are moving in or out of a property.
  • Think about getting a smart meter.
If you can’t pay a back bill If you think you can’t afford to pay, ask your supplier about repayment plan options. They must take into account how much you can afford. They will explain your options. Citizens Advice can also help if you can’t agree on a payment plan or if you’re not happy with the options the supplier has given to you. Call OfGem 0808 223 1133 or use their online webchat. For OfGem textphone, dial 18001 followed by the helpline number. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information business electricity business gas
Give Notice of Termination before current contract ends? It is the term used by the energy industry to describe giving notice that you do not want to be automatically renewed at the end of your current contract.  Normally they ask this to be done by writing or email. Terminating utility services does not mean your electricity or gas will be disconnected. Terminating utility services is what occurs during the process of moving supplier. The business owner once signing and agreeing to a new contract with a new supplier must notify there present supplier following the 30 days+ notice period. This is referred to as Terminating. Utility services can also be disconnected or diverted. Disconnected occurs if the site has gone or the meter has been removed. Diverted occurs if the site has changed and the incomer is being extended or moved to another part of the site. Energy4 can help log your Notice of Termination with your Energy supplier at the right time. Since 2013 Energy4 has noticed attempts by many utility companies to prevent Business owners from moving to other suppliers even when termination notices are given. Normal practices are claiming the Business client has Debts, Issues with supply links, incorrect information, Allowing Business owners too leave on the day of Contract End Date or the Day After, rotating these requirements to obtain a few extra days payment before the supply ends.. OfGem has made it very clear that preventing Business owners from moving to any supplier they choose on fabricated reasons will not be tolerated. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information 1 Give Notice of Termination before current contract ends? business electricity business gas
How are the price comparisons shown Our company is 100% independent, we do not favour one energy company over another, and we work with all the energy companies. We also put the various different quotes into perspective by creating a spreadsheet and a financial forecast. We take your estimated annual usage from your bills, calculate the annual spend using the quotes we have sourced for you and detail your annual spend This makes it easier to establish the best deal, as all suppliers vary the standing charge and unit rates but using your business patterns of usage will show you the best savings Some of our rates are exclusive to our company and consumers will often not be able to negotiate such rates themselves. Our commitment to our customers is to offer them the best value for money with deals that will benefit our customers the most, we do not favour one supplier over another nor do we offer a particular supplier because their commission is better than another as some brokers and consultants do. Our commitment is to our customers first, we believe their savings is important Why is it best to choose our services rather than doing it myself?
  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 27 utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information How are the price comparisons shown? How are the price comparisons shown? business electricity business gas
How can I get a quote – Contact Energy4. If you have your recent energy bill or a renewal letter handy we can give you a quote immediately by phone, this will be based on our comparison of the cheapest prices with energy suppliers. Our live system is regularly updated daily with the latest prices across the market; we include the ‘Big Six’ energy companies on our books When we give a quotation, we detail the savings you could make, give you the various options to choose from, once you have decided on the package that is best suited to you, we will arrange the contract that will be between the supplier and you, we will also keep on top of the situation to make sure that the transfer is smooth How will my business benefit from your services?
  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 40+ utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information How can I get a quote How can I get a quote How can I get a quote How can I get a quote business electricity business gas
How do you operate with your suppliers Energy 4 receives introductory fees from the winning energy supplier when tendering your energy. This means we are completely INDEPENDENT and best placed to help you reduce costs and make efficiencies. We work for our clients NOT for energy suppliers. Why is it best to choose our services rather than doing it myself?
  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 27 utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information How do you operate with your suppliers How do you operate with your suppliers How do you operate with your suppliers business electricity business gas
How long does it take to change suppliers to a new one Each supplier has different termination requirements
  • Please review your Terms and Conditions for cancellation contracts
  • Please pay all outstanding debts
  • Some suppliers demand both a letter and email to confirm a request for change. Please send Energy4 your contract if you cannot identify this.
  • Specific suppliers will offer 28 days to change suppliers
Energy4 will NOT at no point is your energy supply interrupted. We do not abandon you after the switch; we will keep in touch and also remind you before your contract is due to end so you have the options to look at prices again before signing up another contract term Information you need It’s useful to have the following information: Your postcode. The name of your current supplier. The name of your current energy tariff. Your annual energy usage or costs. You can find your tariff, supplier and annual information on a recent energy bill. Log into your online account if you don’t get paper bills. If you aren’t sure about your current supply details, see Finding your energy supplier or network operator. Find tariffs and suppliers Use a comparison website or phone different energy suppliers to find out what you can save by switching. You can ask your supplier if they will match an offer if you find one that’s better elsewhere. Ofgem confidence code Weigh up your options Think about things like: A supplier’s customer service. If the offer is the cheapest, environmentally-friendly or flexible to leave without an exit fee. If you can get cashback or other free incentives as part of your switch offer. If there is a switching guarantee. Some suppliers offer this to help you switch with confidence. Choosing tariffs Learn about different energy tariffs See how suppliers compare on customer service View suppliers offering an Energy Switch Guarantee Confirm your switch The last step is to confirm your contract and payment method. Paying by Direct Debit usually saves money. Your new supplier will contact you with a switching date. It can take up to 21 days to complete a switch. In most cases, it’s around 17 days. If you change your mind, You have 14 days to cancel from when you agree to a contract. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Switching energy tariff or supplier | Ofgem business electricity business gas
How often are the prices updated – This can depend on the supplier and the market. Energy4 is notified directly by suppliers when their prices change. These are then immediately input into our pricing matrix to make sure that the prices you see are as up-to-date as possible. Prices for some suppliers may change every day whilst other suppliers’ prices may not be change for a week Energy4 is constantly informing business customers of the energy price increases. Energy4 is also transparent to identify that many price increases can not be justified, and that many business customers appear to stick with one supplier. How will my business benefit from your services?
  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 40+ utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Information How often are the prices updated business electricity business gas
How will my business benefit from your services?
  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 40+ utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information How will my business benefit from your services How will my business benefit from your services business electricity business gas
I already have an energy broker. Not all Energy brokers and Energy consultants are the same and operate in different ways. Some work indirectly for energy suppliers (so the same energy supplier is always put forward) Some only have access to 2 or 3 energy suppliers so their quotes are similarly limited Some put large profit before keeping Customers in Business. This appears to be the main function of many, Energy4 go beyond this and put your tender out to all the suppliers which include the Big 6. How will my business benefit from your services?
  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 40+ utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information I already have an energy broker I already have an energy broker I already have an energy broker I already have an energy broker business electricity business gas
I do not have enough time to review my energy contracts Energy4 can assist you with this, if you do not have the time to review your contacts. Because we simplify the process as much as possible we only need a minimal amount of time from you or the person who deals with this in your business normally its the Decision Maker.  It’s really easy and very quick for you to receive a quote. Just follow these few simple steps. Step 1 – Latest Copy of Invoice Just provide us with a up-to-date full copy (both sides and all pages) of your latest invoice in respect of ALL your electricity and gas supplies. If you have multiple sites, we need the latest invoice for each site. To streamline the process please write your latest meter readings on each of the invoices. Step 2 – Letter of Authority Energy 4 needs your permission to speak to energy suppliers so all we need is a single LETTER OF AUTHORITY (LOA) on your headed paper which we can send to you by email or fax (the LOA covers both electricity and gas accounts). Step 3 – Send to Energy 4 Return the copy invoices and your LETTER OF AUTHORITY (LOA) and we will complete a quote for your account and business. You can post, fax or scan the LOA and invoices. The process takes 2 – 3 weeks so will be in touch with you as soon as possible . If however you have your renewal letter to hand and we don’t want to get rollover then please tell us and we will make it a priority and start working to get the best unit price from the suppliers. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information I do not have enough time to review my energy contracts I do not have enough time to review my energy contracts I do not have enough time to review my energy  contracts I do not have enough time to review my energy contracts  business electricity business gas
Is a new supply meter required NO. Just as with residential customers, if a company changes to a new supplier, nothing changes other than the price that is paid for the gas or electricity flowing through the meter.  The paperwork, meter and network all remain the same, it is only the company which reads the meter that changes. Can the “Smart meter” charges placed on Customers be justified, specifically extra charges for using the Smart meter, and who owns the Smart meter technology, its cost, and justification? “…The Government (BEIS) own the smart metering policy framework, and have published a cost-benefit analysis…”.  This analysis however does not account for inflation, index rating, and currency valuation changes.  There is nothing Smart about this meter, the term was taken from Smart Grid, an idea for a system to be integrated into every consumer unit.  This also included switch gear across the UK, deactivating unrequired usage during power-grid failures, etc. “…Suppliers are expected to pass both costs and savings of the rollout through to their customers which, over time, should result in net savings…’.  Research shows no evidence of any requirement of suppliers to pass anything on to customers accept there attempt to offload the installation costs. ‘… In addition, the information provided by smart meters should help customers to better manage their energy use and reduce their energy consumption and costs…’.  This information has no relevance, and is directly linked to information from the Carbon Trust.  Industries can improve efficiencies on there process line, insulation, and smart lights can be added.  However, proper site maintenance and upgrading equipment helps to keep costs down. ‘…Energy suppliers are responsible for purchasing and installing smart meters for their customers. Individual energy suppliers procure their own smart meters from a number of different manufacturers, and they must meet technical specifications that are set out in regulation…’.  Currently OfGem has no standing on suppliers offloading installation costs to customers.  It appears they are following the route of less resistance with completing government policy, not the resulting fall-out.  This stance will only change if the Federation of Small Businesses, and other groups lobby government for legislative change. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Is a new supply meter required business electricity business gas

Is your Meter Operator Agreement (MOP contract) in place

A Meter Operator agreement or (MOP contract) is a legal requirement for all half hourly electricity supplied meters. This contract covers the supply of the meter, maintenance and the necessary telecommunications for sending your consumption data to your energy supplier.

The Meter Operator agreement or (MOP contract) is either;

Included into the utility contract – As part of the Utility bill that the customer pays (included into the price of the unit and standing charge). This Included MOP contract only exists for the length of the utility contract.

OR

Separate MOP contract from the utility bill as a MOP service provider contract – There are multiple MOP providers in area region who compete to provide these services.

However they request customers sign up to 18 month, 30 month, etc., waht is called an unneccesary over-run contract, that well exceed the utiltiy contract. This is to benefit the MOP provider because this forces the business owner to sign another 18 month contract later down the line.

If the Business customer signs a contract where the MOP is included, they still have to pay for the external MOP provider, they will simply be told not to collect data. The main output of the data being collected is to allow the Electrical grid and providers to identify the usage of the electrical infrastructure and if the Grid can supply and local Transformers can deliver. Over capacity can damage electrical lines, infrastructure, damage transformers, and cause “black-outs”.

You do NOT have to be forced to go with a specific MOP service provider, there are multiple companies in each area. Strongly advise that you ask Energy4 to locate all the local MOP providers, and provide a list of each of there services, and there annual costs.

The supplier you are with cannot dictate terms of your MOP provider if they are not helping to facilitate the MOP service.

Utility providers are currently doing this which is illegal under the Consumer act as it is causing a monolopy of services in areas.

Where MOP came from?

As part of the UK de-regulated energy market you now have the right to appoint your own meter operator as apposed to letting your current energy supplier appoint there preferred supplier as the cost is often hidden in a suppliers standing charge.

The subject of metering is often confusing for customers since privatisation, particularly since the meter operator contract is no longer part of the supply agreement.

Many customers are unaware of required legislation such as the statutory requirement that sites with a maximum demand in excess of 100kW should have half-hourly metering installed as standard, and are unsure of who to contact.

The process of managing the relationship between the Supplier, Meter Operator and Local Distributor is often a minefield, and is an area where many customers choose to outsource.

If you are unsure if you have a MOP agreement in place for your half hourly site please call Energy4 on 01642 888814.

 

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Is your Meter Operator Agreement (MOP contract) in place

business electricity business gas

Is your supply exempt – Any supply from renewable sources is automatically exempt from CCL, as is domestic or charitable non-business use. If your organisation is defined as an energy intensive user or a horticulture user, your supply may qualify for partial exemption. The Climate Change Levy (CCL) exemption schemes for renewables and combined heat and power (CHP) are closed. Levy exemption certificates (LECs), which were issued under these schemes, were only issued to electricity generated from CHP generators before 1 April 2013 and renewables generators before 1 August 2015. Transitional arrangements were in place until 1 April 2018 for a supplier to use these LECs to evidence the exemption. Ofgem was responsible for administering the CCL exemptions for renewables and CHP in Great Britain on behalf of HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) through a certification scheme. Under this scheme Ofgem issued LECs to eligible generators which were ultimately passed through to suppliers as the evidence needed to demonstrate to HMRC that electricity supplied to UK business customers is CCL exempt. It was then the final recipient of electricity supplied that could benefit from the tax exemption. More information on the Climate Change Levy can be found on the HMRC website As the UK pursues a goal of “Net Zero” greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, the UK’s Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) has been focusing on “integrating” the North Sea’s established oil and gas industry with its rapidly growing offshore wind sector and nascent carbon capture and storage (CCS) and hydrogen projects. Recent publications have given this process added impetus. In this article, we look at the prospects for synergies between the upstream industry and renewables. Context On 6 May 2020, the OGA published a consultation on proposed revisions to its Strategy. In previous articles we have reviewed the consultation and the proposed changes as a whole (see The OGA in Energy Transition: UK aims for upstream oil and gas regulation in line with “net zero” goals), explored the general themes of CCS, hydrogen, repurposing of upstream assets, platform electrification, gas-to-wire and offshore wind (see Evolution of Oil & Gas: The OGA’s Net Zero Goals), and looked in more detail at the subject of CCS from an upstream perspective (see The OGA’s Net Zero Goals: in-depth view of CCS and the upstream industry). The OGA’s consultation proposed that the Strategy’s Central Obligation of maximising the economic recovery of petroleum should remain the same, but with an additional limb (b) which would require relevant persons to assist the Secretary of State in meeting the Net Zero Target. The consultation document comments that this new limb is based on the idea that “relevant persons” (i.e. the industry) are “uniquely” placed to assist with reducing emissions and supporting projects in the transition to a low carbon economy. The consultation highlights platform electrification as one way that the industry can do this. The term “electrification” in this context is slightly misleading, in the sense that platforms are already powered by electricity. What is being referred to here is moving to a position where that electricity, rather than being produced by high carbon, on-platform generating equipment, is supplied from lower carbon sources – notably onshore or offshore renewable electricity generators. On 16 June 2020, about halfway through the period when the OGA’s Strategy proposals were out to consultation, Oil and Gas UK (OGUK) published a report entitled The Pathway to Net Zero: Production Emissions Targets. This notes that upstream emissions account for 4% of UK greenhouse gas emissions and that the bulk of those emissions come from offshore power generation. It also highlights the potential for full or partial electrification of offshore assets, localised CCS on individual assets, integration of offshore hubs, and electrification of onshore terminals and processing plants. The report’s focus on collective innovation and coordinated effort between industry and government is consistent with the OGA’s proposals in its consultation. About a week after the Strategy consultation concluded, the OGA published its UKCS Energy Integration: Final Report (6 August 2020) (Final Report). For the purposes of this article, the key headlines in the Final Report are:
  • “Offshore O&G installations emit ~10MtCO2 e p.a. to generate power (~10% of the UK total energy supply emissions). Platform electrification will be key to cutting upstream O&G emissions, and to the industry’s social licence to operate. Offshore electrification may unlock the faster growth of renewables, expansion of offshore transmission infrastructure, and establishment of floating windpower technologies in the UK, contributing to offshore renewables’ 75GW capacity ambition by 2050.”
This is a bold vision, and its achievability depends on many factors. Here, we focus on some of the potential barriers to such integration from an energy lawyer’s perspective. Platform electrification By far the most prominent technological focus of the proposed changes to the Strategy is on carbon capture and storage (CCS) – no doubt, in part, because it has been identified as a key and as yet under-developed element of decarbonisation of the wider economy in which upstream assets have a central role to play as CO2 stores. CCS also features more prominently in the Final Report. However, the Strategy consultation document mentions platform electrification as many times as CCS as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as far as reasonable by considering all applicable options for existing and new developments. Moreover, the Final Report contains a detailed Annex on “offshore electrification”, as well as one on CCS, which between them give the clearest insight yet into the OGA’s vision for integrating high and low carbon industries in the UKCS. As both the OGUK report and the Final Report note, upstream platforms are huge consumers of energy, nearly all of which is currently produced through the burning of fossil fuels. Most UK platforms are powered by on-site gas turbines which, on average, consume 5% of all gas produced at the well-head. Globally, combustion-related carbon emissions from platforms have been estimated at around 200 million tonnes of CO2 per year, roughly equivalent to the total emissions of Vietnam.1 In a mature basin such as the North Sea, which is likely to be relying for an increasing proportion of its output on secondary and tertiary, rather than primary recovery, the industry’s power requirements for extraction are likely to grow. Reducing the reliance on gas turbines by adding or substituting renewable sources of electricity, therefore, has clear environmental benefits, but there can be economic advantages too. Less gas used to power generators means more gas that can be sold to market or re-injected into wells to maximise oil recovery. Removing the need for on-platform power generators results in space saved on rigs, and could lead to lower capital expenditure to offset the power connection cost.2 For this reason, platform electrification is a more attractive economic option for greenfield sites compared to brownfield sites, which will require higher costs to retrofit. Moreover, there are health and safety benefits for those working offshore, with reduced noise, vibrations and fumes. Carbon pricing – or the potential for it to apply more extensively in the upstream sector – may be another consideration that favours electrification. No or fewer CO2 emissions from offshore generators would mean reducing or eliminating their potential costs of emitting carbon. At present, unlike fossil-fuel power generators onshore, the upstream industry benefits from “free allocation” of allowances under the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS). In the UKCS, the gas they use to generate power is not subject to the “carbon price support” rate of the UK’s climate change levy (CCL). Upstream power generation activities have, therefore, not been subject to a carbon price. However, the EU ETS “carbon leakage list” (CLL) that determines which sectors receive free allocation of allowances is about to become less generous: when EU ETS Phase 4 begins in 2021, it will still cover emissions produced by the extraction of oil, but not those produced by the extraction of gas. Although the UK is no longer in the EU and its plans for carbon pricing after 2020 when the Brexit transition period ends are not finally fixed, the government has indicated its preference for a UK ETS that would follow the same approach as the EU ETS Phase 4 CLL. This could change. However, over time, further extension of UK carbon pricing to upstream generation (e.g. through the carbon price support rate of CCL) is also possible. It is not surprising, therefore, that the Final Report highlights future carbon pricing policy as a key determinant of the economic feasibility of electrification projects. This is particularly true of what the Final Report calls “brownfield” projects – those that would replace existing offshore fossil-fuelled generation with new sources (onshore or offshore) of renewable power. Shore-to-platform electrification Platform electrification is not a new idea. Norway’s Troll A gas platform has been electrified since it came onstream in 1996, with power from an onshore generation plant reaching the platform via an undersea cable. Such “shore-to-platform” arrangements are currently the most common form of electrification in the North Sea. Benefiting from the overwhelmingly renewable mix of Norwegian power generation (dominated by hydroelectricity), the Johan Sverdrup field in Norway emits just 0.67kg of CO2 per barrel of oil produced, around 4% of the world average.3 The Netherlands also utilises shore-to-platform electricity on one of its rigs. The benefits of being connected to the onshore electricity grid include high security of supply and reliability. In the UKCS, shore-to-platform electrification is currently being considered in the West of Shetland (WoS) area. Shetland Council and the Oil and Gas Technology Centre (OGTC) are working together to create a new Energy Hub on the islands, which will examine how electrification can help the area’s offshore assets reach Net Zero by 2030. On 30 July 2020, Ofgem confirmed that it was satisfied that a final decision had been taken on the proposed 440MW Viking wind farm on Shetland,4 thereby unlocking Ofgem’s conditional approval for the planned Shetland to Mainland High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) Interconnector, and making it more likely that some of the renewable electricity produced by wind farms on Shetland could in future be made available to offshore platforms. Several upstream players all have assets in the region that could potentially benefit.5 For the majority of UKCS platforms, however, shore-to-platform technologies are unlikely to be a viable option – at least as far as power from UK onshore generators is concerned. The cost-benefit estimates in the relevant Annex to the Final Report show onshore electrification opex costs for electrification from the UK shore that are almost double those for offshore electrification or supply from Norway. Away from Shetland, it is less common to find the same potential for using new UK onshore renewable generating capacity to supply relatively closely located upstream assets that are also new, or at any rate have a long operational life ahead of them. Diverting the output of existing grid-connected renewable generating capacity to offshore platforms is more likely to reduce green energy available for end users onshore, and thus reduce the net benefit in terms of reducing carbon emissions. An upstream player that wished to demonstrate strongly its support for net zero objectives might prefer to take any shore-to-platform supply of green power specifically from new renewable generating capacity, so as to be able to satisfy the criterion of “additionality” that is central to many renewable corporate power purchase agreements (i.e. that without the corporate customer’s long-term commitment to purchase the generator’s output, the generator’s project would not have been built). This reinforces the need to control project costs by finding sources of onshore generation that are closely located to upstream assets whose residual life is well matched to those of the generator’s if this model of integration is to succeed. The Final Report also contemplates the possibility that connections to new power interconnectors, such as the North Sea Network link between the UK and Norway, could bring power to platforms further from shore than current shore-to-platform technologies allow. One drawback of connecting to HVDC cables may be the likely need to install a DC-AC converter on the platform, with the accompanying costs and loss of space that this will bring. However, considerations of practicality and commercial feasibility are not the only potential barriers to shore-to-platform approaches to electrification. There are also potential regulatory obstacles – or at least gaps. For example, at present, the development of the offshore wind industry has given rise to a regime where licences for offshore-to-shore transmission links are issued on a competitive basis through the offshore transmission operator (OFTO) tender process, with the winning bidder assuming ownership of transmission assets that have invariably been constructed by the wind farm developer, but which are not permitted to be permanently operated by a generator because of electricity sector “unbundling” rules. If it was thought appropriate to apply a similar model to shore-to-platform links, the existing regulatory framework would need to be adapted, because it is based on a statutory concept of “offshore transmission” that appears only to include the offshore transmission of electricity generated offshore, not onshore generated electricity going offshore.6 The regulatory changes that would be required to facilitate any use of interconnectors in platform electrification would be likely to be significant still. Interconnectors are currently treated as connections between the transmission systems of different countries, rather than being able to convey power directly to end users, and the UK’s existing interconnectors all currently connect to the onshore part of the grid. However, an open letter published by Ofgem on 12 August 2020 indicates that it is maybe prepared to think again about other models, including “multi-purpose interconnectors”, that “could link interconnectors with offshore renewable generation, and might form part of a potential North Seas grid”. That said, one potentially substantial advantage of shore-to-platform electrification for any upstream players not constrained by concerns for “additionality” would be that it should in one way or another allow them to be supplied with “100% renewable” power that is also always available (subject to any problems with the transmission cables). This is because being connected to the onshore grid means being connected to the output of a huge number of generators, and a large number of suppliers offering, in various forms, packages of electricity that can all be counted in one way or another as green, rather than perhaps one or two sources of intermittent offshore renewable electricity as might be the case with an offshore electrification option (see further below). Electrification through offshore wind While shore-to platform electrification could be viable for some UKCS platforms, the use of offshore wind is starting to look as if it may be a more attractive option for a majority of installations. The possibility of integrating offshore wind turbines into the power supply of offshore platforms has been considered in several contexts, at least as a method to supplement generation from existing gas generators. In respect of platforms which are further offshore or otherwise isolated from existing grid infrastructure, electrification through offshore wind installations has the potential advantage of not requiring installation of long subsea cables to ensure connection to the onshore grid. There are already a number of areas where existing or planned offshore wind farms are located close to upstream assets, and the scope for co-location appears set to increase as interest in floating offshore wind technology grows – with the offshore wind sector in many respects following the same journey from fixed to floating platforms that the oil and gas industry went through in past decades. For example, notwithstanding the work on possible shore-to-platform links in the WoS area noted above, it may also be that WoS, with its relatively deep water and early stage of development as an oil and gas area, is well suited to the deployment of floating offshore wind. The problem, of course, is that at present a connection to an offshore wind farm is not a complete substitute for on-platform generation in the way that a shore-to-platform supply could be, because offshore wind turbines generate intermittently and their output cannot be adjusted up and down in the way that a gas turbine can. In other words, you would probably need both technologies in order to ensure security of supply, and the intermittent nature of wind and the different stages of oil field exploitation give rise to significant variability of operating conditions. This presents challenges when identifying the optimal size and operating parameters of the parallel renewable and fossil-fuel generating capacity that would be required for a given platform (particularly in a “greenfield” scenario). From a “maximum low carbon” point of view, it may be that the need for fossil-fuelled generation could be reduced or eliminated by connecting more wind generating capacity than is required at any one time and storing excess energy in batteries or in the form of hydrogen (produced by using the excess electricity to electrolyse water), which could then be used to supply or generate electricity when the wind turbines are not generating enough, or at all. However, it is not in any sense clear whether, or how soon, such options are likely to be feasible in this context (a combination of gas and wind power may be likely to be a materially cheaper option for some time). Although pollution reduction and sustainability considerations are key drivers for platform electrification, the primary objective for a platform operator remains the continuous and safe production of hydrocarbons with minimum risk of plant failure. Offering high reliability, compactness and dynamic flexibility, gas turbines remain the leading offshore electrification technology: it seems that, for the foreseeable future, offshore wind is more likely to complement than to replace them. On the NCS, Hywind Tampen is being developed by Equinor and its project partners on Snørre and Gullfaks. Located some 140 kilometres offshore (260-300 metre water-depth), the 11 floating offshore wind turbines, with a combined capacity of 88MW, will supplement existing gas turbine facilities on the Snørre and Gullfaks platforms with an estimated CO2 emission reduction of 200k tons/year. While managing various (and often competing) stakeholder priorities, developers of similar projects will need to consider the apportionment of interests and associated rights and responsibilities within the project documents. For instance, the project documents will need to account for the dynamic interplay between the operator of the offshore platform and the operator of the offshore wind farm. Subject to applicable regulatory developments (including carbon pricing), the contractual framework may seek to prescribe the circumstances in which the platform operator has flexibility to take gas (including, for example, asset integrity or economic reasons). For the offshore wind side of such arrangements, it is possible to envisage a number of different possible ownership and contractual structures.
  • Upstream platform operators (or some or all of the participants in one or more upstream joint ventures) could choose to build and operate the wind turbines themselves (not least in view of the increasing design synergies between the two technologies noted above) or they could contract with a third party generator/supplier of offshore wind power.
  • A given set of wind turbines could either be “captive” generators, dedicated to a particular upstream platform (or platforms), or they could have the ability to supply other users (including potentially those onshore).
  • In order for the wind farm project sponsor(s) to manage effectively offtake risk (and ensure project bankability), the power purchase agreement with the platform operator (offtaker) may prescribe “take or pay” provisions, giving the platform operator flexibility to take such delivery as may (from time to time) be dictated by its operational needs, on the condition that it pays for volumes which would otherwise be delivered. This may be particularly likely in a “captive generator” scenario with a third party wind farm operator. On the other hand, a wind farm with more export options may have an incentive to divert its production away from the upstream platform and sell its output elsewhere, or reserve flexibility to connect to existing or upgraded OFTO arrangements. This optionality would require detailed consideration of the contractual framework and applicable regulatory obligations.
  • One potential advantage of floating turbines could be their ability to be deployed in more than one location over their operational life. In principle, this could open up the possibility that they could supply platforms with a shorter remaining operational life than their own, and then move on to supply another. However, it remains to be seen whether this approach would be feasible in terms of relocation costs (including reuse of connecting cables), and there would also be questions around the bankability of a business model based on a series of PPAs with different counterparties and associated offtaker creditworthiness issues.
  • For renewable generators without ties to the upstream industry, the key question for the moment may be how the premium that upstream platforms are prepared to pay for green electricity compares to the strike price that the generators think they can achieve in an allocation round for Contracts for Difference (CfD) subsidising renewable electricity. Then again, just as at least some offshore wind farms that export (or plan to export) all their output to the onshore grid are taking a conscious decision to divide their output between a CfD-subsidised and a subsidy-free, merchant element, it may be that some developers would be attracted to developing projects that blended an element of “guaranteed” income under a contract with an upstream platform with exports further afield on a CfD or merchant basis.
The OGA in its Final Report also raises a number of relevant regulatory questions.
  • How could wind power and oil and gas electrification timelines be better aligned, given the shorter lifetime of oil and gas assets?
  • How could “access to seabed” be managed if proposed wind farms were to be installed on licensed oil and gas acreage?
  • Could “route to market” decisions be simplified if wind farm developments are for sole supply of oil and gas installations?
  • Could surveys and results of an oil and gas environmental impact assessment be used (where applicable) to satisfy requirements of wind farms in the vicinity of installations?
We will shortly be publishing more on the prospects for floating offshore wind in general, addressing in more detail some of the commercial and regulatory challenges it faces to scale up, regardless of how useful it may be in the near term as a solution for platform electrification. Additional offshore generation technologies which could support platform electrification While offshore wind appears to be the preferred method of electrification for most platforms in the medium to long term, there are some other technologies that may prove useful in reaching Net Zero. A number of companies are developing technologies for floating solar PV panels, although to date these have mostly been deployed on inland lakes, dams and shallow coastal waters. Work is now underway to develop panels that can withstand the harsh conditions of the open North Sea. The Zon-op-Zee project in the Netherlands “remained stable and intact in all conditions” as it weathered winds of up to 62 knots and waves more than five metres high during Storm Ciara in early 20207, albeit that conditions in the North Sea can be more severe than this. Flying kites are another niche form of power that may be appropriate for certain platforms. These have been suggested for installations that are in water too deep for fixed offshore wind turbines but for which floating wind turbines are not economic. Shell has recently invested in Makani, an Alphabet subsidiary that has piloted the technology off the Norwegian coast. These kites look similar to airplanes and are attached to buoys on the sea surface. Rotors attached to the wings spin in the wind to generate electricity as the kite flies round in a loop. These kites can be produced at a fraction of the cost of a floating wind turbine, but large-scale generation using this technology is at least five to 10 years away, according to BloombergNEF.8 In the immediate term, Premier Oil and the OGTC are piloting the use of Ocean Power Technologies’ PB3 PowerBuoy® on Premier’s Huntington field. This is a moored buoy that captures power from the motion of ocean waves to allow it to provide monitoring capabilities and protect subsea architecture. The technology will monitor the local environment and alert ships of the field’s safety zone as a potential solution to help with their future decommissioning. The buoy constantly recharges itself by harvesting energy from waves, operating in depths from 20 up to 3,000 metres9 . Powering on-board or sea-bed sensors, it enables real-time data transfer and communication with remote facilities. When paired up with different payload configurations, the buoys will be able to support small field developments or act as a charging/communications hub for Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) applications.10 Gas-to-Wire Gas-to-wire as a concept involves the offshore combustion of gas to generate power which can then be exported to the onshore grid using existing offshore wind transmission infrastructure or through bespoke transmission systems. In certain circumstances, the transmission of gas-generated power may be more economical or feasible for an upstream company than the transportation of gas. Gas-to-wire has a more obvious affinity with the original, and still fundamental, objective of the OGA Strategy (maximising the economic recovery of petroleum or MER) than it does with the proposed new Net Zero additions to the Strategy. Perhaps for this reason, it is not explicitly mentioned in the OGA’s recent consultation, and it is less prominent in its Final Report than platform electrification. However, its potential has previously been highlighted by the OGA and it is not necessarily incompatible with the pursuit of Net Zero objectives.11 There is increasing interest in gas-to-wire as a solution for companies accessing undeveloped or stranded gas reserves e.g. remote pools or tight gas plays where such reserves would otherwise be uneconomic to develop with conventional (pipeline) access to market. One possible model would see mobile platforms fitted with aeroderivative gas turbines connecting to these marginal assets to produce electricity, and moving on to the next asset as each one is fully depleted. Gas-to-wire could play a part in extending the economic viability of late-life assets where production is declining by potentially providing a more cost-effective means to monetise the remaining gas by converting it into power. Extending the life of assets in this way could also help defer expensive decommissioning costs. Another use would be for it simply to provide an extra revenue stream for companies and reduce future opex costs, particularly with regard to costs associated with the export of gas e.g. compression. Much depends on whether transmission of power or transportation of gas is more economically or technically feasible in any given circumstances. On its own, a gas-to-wire project is unlikely to assist directly in the achievement of Net Zero. In theory, gas-to-wire could be used in conjunction with CCS to provide low carbon, but non-renewable power. However, it is unclear whether carbon capture offshore and from the kinds of generating equipment concerned would be cost-effective. There is also the possibility that the offshore combustion of gas for the production of electricity to be exported onshore via offshore wind cable capacity could free up existing gas export pipelines for use on CCS projects involving onshore emitters. However, the principal use of a gas-to-wire project would likely be to fulfil a company’s obligation under the Strategy to maximise the economic recovery of otherwise unrecoverable petroleum – for example, by extending asset life to avoid “domino effects” when one of a number of interlinked assets is decommissioned. It is yet to be seen how the OGA would prioritise the competing obligations of a company with respect to compliance with the Central Obligation (i) as it stands, and (ii) with the likely addition of the further obligation to contribute towards Net Zero. Given the unincorporated joint venture nature of the majority of offshore oil and gas operations, a key component in the implementation of any gas-to-wire project will be obtaining the consent of the joint venture parties. It is unlikely that existing JOAs include provision for the re-purposing of late-life assets for gas-to-wire. Such proposals will not suit every industry participant and there are key differences between marketing gas and power: many upstream participants will be less familiar with the power sector. Oil and gas companies that are interested in the concept will likely want to start discussing any such proposals with their JOA parties as soon as possible to get an understanding as to the level of agreement within the JV regarding using gas-to-wire to develop further gas reserves or as a means of extending the economic viability of late-life assets, as well as coupling it with CCS technology. Similarly, JV parties that may not want to pursue a gas-to-wire project and are in the minority in terms of voting power and/or JV participating interest will likely want to understand what protections are afforded to them under the JOA. Before any question of JOA provision arises, the potential feasibility of gas-to-wire for any upstream asset is likely to depend to a large extent on there being nearby existing or proposed offshore wind transmission infrastructure with some spare capacity. Unless a gas-to-wire project can make use of such infrastructure, the capex costs involved in an oil and gas company developing its own transmission system for the electricity it generates may be prohibitively high unless the asset is located close to the shore. The location of a company’s assets is therefore key. Currently, the areas of focus for potential gas-to-wire projects – as promoted by the OGA – are the Southern North Sea and East Irish Sea where existing oil and gas and offshore wind infrastructure already co-exist in close proximity to one another (the OGA has highlighted 15 cases where an upstream hub is within 10-50km of an existing or planned offshore wind farm in these areas).12 Additionally, not all platforms will be suitable to host a gas turbine with sufficient capacity to make a gas-to-wire project commercially viable. Without its own dedicated power export cable, a gas-to-wire project would depend on (i) the willingness of a wind farm owner or OFTO to accept additional power generation and (ii) the spare capacity in existing offshore wind transmission systems. Neither of these points is necessarily straightforward.
  • Wind farm owners and OFTOs are used to a model in which they only have each other to think about: one generator, and one transmission operator, per offshore link. OFTOs are not like onshore grid operators which are used to coping with multiple power flows and all kinds of generation and demand. Introducing a second generator using a different technology is a significant complication to their business model – and that of those who finance them.
  • Taking a positive view, one could point to the fact that the OFTO would be transmitting more electricity. However, precisely because wind generation is intermittent and they only have one generator customer each, OFTOs are currently remunerated largely on the basis of their availability, rather than on a £/MWh basis for power actually transmitted.
  • Looking at things from the offshore wind farm’s perspective, perhaps it could strike more advantageous commercial arrangements with those who purchase its power if it were packaged together with that of the gas-to-wire generator – potentially converting its intermittent output into baseload generation if the gas-to-wire generator flexed its generation up and down so as to mirror the troughs and peaks of wind power output? In one sense, there is nothing to stop any wind farm operator entering into such an arrangement with a gas-fired generator already connected to the grid elsewhere. The only advantage of doing so with a gas-to-wire generator would be if its operating costs were materially lower than those of equivalent existing onshore units. It is not clear whether this would be the case. The offshore gas generator will inevitably have some new infrastructure costs that its onshore counterpart would not. On the other hand, its gas supply will not come with all the same associated transport and processing costs, and it may have a carbon pricing advantage – although this could be eroded (see above on UK ETS and carbon price support).
  • Joining forces with a gas-to-wire generator could also have disadvantages for a wind farm operator, if it were a party to a CfD or other arrangement that relied on its output being 100% renewable. At the very least, some bespoke metering arrangements would be required.
  • Currently, over the course of a year, the average offshore transmission link only utilises 40% of its capacity so, on the face of it, there is plenty of capacity available for gas-to-wire. The problem is that the wind farms are generally incentivised to generate and export power whenever they can, and their output, although predictable within certain parameters over the course of a year, fluctuates significantly from day to day and hour to hour with changes in the weather. The OGA’s study of gas-to-wire assumes that wind output would take priority in allocating scarce capacity on any transmission link, but it says little about any possible efficiency and other impacts on the upstream generator or the gas extraction activities that lie behind it of flexing its generation in this way.
Assuming that agreement could be reached with a wind farm owner or OFTO, if there is insufficient capacity in existing transmission assets to allow the gas-to-wire and renewable generators to export their power for much of the time, there appear to be two options: (i) reinforcement of the existing assets; or (ii) a regime that allocates scarce transmission capacity between the two generators in a pre-determined way. If reinforcement of existing assets is required in order to facilitate offshore gas-power generation, an oil and gas company would likely need to make a connection application to the National Electricity System Operator (NETSO). The NETSO may request that an OFTO make additional capacity available to the new generator. If requested, the OFTO is required to offer terms to the NETSO for providing the additional capacity (so long as it does not exceed 20% of the initial capital cost). However, it is not clear how realistic a prospect this is, as the interactions with the OFTO regime are not straightforward and, in any event, reinforcement is unlikely to be achievable without additional capex in most cases. The amount of spare capacity in OFTO assets, including the variation of such capacity on a day-to-day basis, and the cost of any required reinforcement as well as the unknown willingness of stakeholders in existing OFTO assets to allow alterations to be made to existing infrastructure all add additional complexity to any potential gas-to-wire project, quite possibly making many such projects uneconomic. There may also be technical challenges to having mixed generation at OFTO connection points that may need to be overcome (for example, separate metering of the gas-fired generator’s output to that of the output from the wind farm for which the wind power generator is entitled to receive subsidies). An offshore generating station other than a wind farm, which generates power for the onshore grid rather than to power upstream industry processes, is currently a regulatory anomaly. With respect to the current oil and gas regulatory regime, licences for the exploration and production of petroleum granted pursuant to the Petroleum Act 1998 do not expressly provide for the licensee to obtain consent from the OGA to use natural gas for power generation. Currently, a licensee is required to obtain consent from the OGA for the flaring of gas or for re-injection for the purposes of creating or increasing well pressure, so it is likely that OGA consent would also be needed for the use of gas for offshore power generation of a commercial nature. We consider that such consent would be separate from any approval given at the development stage for an operator to use natural gas from the well as fuel gas for production operations, particularly given the larger volumes that would be involved and that such gas-generated power would be for onward supply and commercial gain. Therefore, there may need to be an amendment to the current statutory licence terms to cater for such consent to be given. Further questions also arise as to the rules under which gas-to-wire would be consented for planning/environmental purposes. Would it need a generating licence under the Electricity Act 1989? (Answer: yes, unless its output was below 50MW or it sought and obtained from ministers an individual exemption from the requirement to hold such a licence.) What rules on non-CO2 emissions would apply to it? What changes may be required to electricity industry codes in respect of it? There are, in short, many legal, as well as practical questions to consider in relation to gas-to-wire, and it is not yet clear whether the “size of the prize” in commercial terms is such as to motivate regulators to answer them all. Conclusion While the OGA’s consultation focuses primarily on utilising CCS or hydrogen projects as a way of helping the wider economy to decarbonise, platform electrification and gas-to-wire could help certain upstream players comply with the Net Zero obligation whilst also maximising their recovery of economically recoverable petroleum. The Final Report contains some very interesting ideas about how these concepts could be developed. However, such projects raise fundamental considerations of practicality and commercial feasibility whilst also requiring some regulatory changes before they could become a reality. However, the regulatory/political will to make such changes may exist. For example, to the extent that the offshore transmission regime contributes to any of the obstacles or uncertainties considered above, it should be noted that the government has recently kicked off a review of the current regime. Although this is being done more with a view to facilitating the government’s very ambitious 2030 offshore wind targets than with the needs of oil and gas power supply in mind, it is possible that some of the challenges that the upstream industry faces could be alleviated by any forthcoming burst of new legislative and regulatory activity in this area.
  1. Wood Mackenzie: “Why powering oil and gas platforms with renewables makes sense”, October 2019
  2. Energy Voice: “Shetland Energy Hub aims for hundreds of jobs and to make giant oilfields ‘net zero by 2030’”, 24 June 2020, https://www.energyvoice.com/otherenergy/248006/energy-hub-hopes-to-make-giant-west-of-shetland-oilfields-net-zero-by-2030/
  3. See Electricity Act 1989, section 6C(5).
  4. Recharge News: “World’s first offshore solar array rides out storm Ciara off Netherlands”, 16 February 2020, https://www.rechargenews.com/transition/worlds-first-offshore-solar-array-rides-out-storm-ciara-off-netherlands/2-1-757022
  5. Bloomberg: “Flying Wind Turbines Make Their First Trip Offshore in Norway”, 15 August 2019, https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-08-15/flying-wind-power-turbine-makes-first-trip-offshore-in-norway
  6. Offshore Engineer: “Premier Oil Testing PB3 PowerBuoy in the North Sea”, 23 August 2019, https://www.oedigital.com/news/469883-premier-oil-testing-pb3-powerbuoy-in-the-north-sea
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information Further information 2 Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt Is your supply exempt business electricity business gas
Energy4 simplifies the process as much as possible we only need a minimal amount of time from you or the person who deals with this in your business normally it’s the Decision Maker. It’s really easy and very quick for you to receive a quote. Just follow these few simple steps Step 1 – Latest Copy of Invoice Just provide us with a up-to-date full copy (both sides and all pages) of your latest invoice in respect of ALL your electricity and gas supplies. If you have multiple sites, we need the latest invoice for each site. To streamline the process please write your latest meter readings on each of the invoices. Step 2 – Letter of Authority Energy4 needs your permission to speak to energy suppliers so all we need is a single LETTER OF AUTHORITY (LOA) on your headed paper which we can send to you by email or fax (the LOA covers both electricity and gas accounts) Step 3 – Send to Energy4 Return the copy invoices and your LETTER OF AUTHORITY (LOA) and we will complete a quote for your account and business. You can post, fax or scan the LOA and invoices. The process takes 2 – 3 weeks so will be in touch with you as soon as possible . If however you have your renewal letter to hand and we don’t want to get rollover then please tell us and we will make it a priority and start working to get the best unit price from the suppliers. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information OfGem information Large business how much time will this take to do business electricity business gas
My business has received a court summons A court summons for a disputed utility bill, can be reviewed by Energy4. Depending on how far the process has progressed we might be able to intervene. We will assist to ensure all the correct procedures have been followed. Because the energy supplier will have applied to the Magistrate’s Court to have your meter disconnected.  To help prevent progression to a court summons make sure you contact Energy4. If you receive any demand from your energy supplier, we can assess the situation.  But only if you contact us quickly in order to start negotiations where appropriate. Common complaints in the energy sector. Energy Ombudsman know how inconvenient it is when issues occur with a service that you rely on. Our experience dealing with complaints means Energy Ombudsman. understand the most common types of problems and how to go about resolving them as quickly as possible. The most common types of energy complaints are about: Gas and electricity bills. Problems that arise as a result of switching energy supplier. The way an energy product or service has been sold, including door step sales. The supply of energy to a home. Micro generation and Feed-in-Tariffs. Problems relating to the provision of services under the Green Deal. Problems relating to District Heating suppliers who are part of the Heat Trust Scheme. Network Providers when there is a loss of supply or a problem with a connection or repair. Unfortunately, Energy Ombudsman not the right people to deal with complaints about things like: Commercial decisions made by companies about whether to provide a product or service. Liquid petroleum gas (LPG). Energy Ombudsman helped over 90,000 people like you. If you are a domestic or micro business consumer of an energy company, you have the right to use our service. Energy Ombudsman resolved over 90,000 of complaints about providers in the energy sector. Energy Ombudsman learn from all the complaints, Energy Ombudsman handle and use that insight to work with providers to help them improve their service, by making recommendations, such as: Using insight and experience to support the supplier of last resort process, ensuring affected customers receive a fair deal. Identifying annual statement inaccuracies, which resulted in corrections to a wide-ranging billing system error. Correcting incorrect calorific values to ensure accurate billing. Who Energy Ombudsman work with. Energy Ombudsman have more than 450 energy providers signed up to our scheme. Search by supplier Want to escalate a complaint to us? If your provider is signed up to our scheme and you’ve tried to resolve your problem with them already, then Energy Ombudsman may be able to help. Unfortunately, our online service is not available for complaints about the Green Deal and network providers, see the common questions section below for how to complain. Ready to complain? Start your complaint Common questions about complaining to your energy supplier. What’s the difference between a domestic and micro business consumer? A domestic customer is a person who has energy provided to their home. Whereas a micro business customer will meet the below criteria: An annual consumption of electricity of not more than 100,000 kWh; or An annual consumption of gas of not more than 293,000 kWh; or Fewer than the equivalent of ten full time employees and an annual turnover or annual balance sheet not exceeding €2 million. Where the micro business receives gas and electricity supplied by the same energy supplier, the annual consumption of gas and electricity shall be treated separately for the purposes of determining its capacity to make a complaint to Ombudsman Services: Energy. Which Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) complaints can you review? The Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and Ofgem set the rules for FIT applications. If energy suppliers don’t follow these rules, Energy Ombudsman can consider complaints about FITs. It’s the FIT applicant’s responsibility to ensure that the application: Is fully completed and contains the correct information. The energy supplier receives it before the deadline. It’s not the energy supplier’s responsibility to check the application. Therefore, they can’t be held responsible and Energy Ombudsman can’t recommend that an energy supplier applies a higher FIT if it didn’t receive a correct and completed application before the deadline. Complaints about Network Providers. Energy Ombudsman can consider complaints about network providers if there is a loss of service or a problem with a connection or repair. You can find out who your network provider is via the Energy Networks Association website. Here’s a list of the Network providers that Energy Ombudsman can take complaints about How to make a complaint about a Network Provider. Contact us for more help and advice on 0330 440 1624. What is the Green Deal? The Green Deal helps you make energy-saving improvements to your home and find the best way to pay for them. The improvements that could save you the most energy depend on your home, but typical examples include: Insulation, such as solid wall, cavity wall or loft insulation. Heating. Draught-proofing. Double glazing. Renewable energy generation, such as solar panels or heat pumps. You can find out more about the Green Deal at gov.uk. Do you handle complaints about the Green Deal? Ombudsman Services has been appointed as an ombudsman and investigation service for the Green Deal. Our job is to help resolve complaints about Green Deal providers, if they’re unable or unwilling to help if something goes wrong with a Green Deal plan. Green Deal providers must be authorised by the Green Deal Oversight and Registration Body and they’re required to be part of our scheme. Green Deal complaints Energy Ombudsman can deal with. Energy Ombudsman have the power to look at complaints that aren’t resolved to the satisfaction of the consumer within eight weeks, or if the consumer has been unable to register a complaint with the Green Deal provider. Energy Ombudsman also deal with complaints where the seller or landlord of a house fails to disclose key information about a Green Deal plan, which they should do by giving the new bill payer a copy of an Energy Performance Certificate. Acknowledgement should be made on the contract is sale for a buyer, or by signing an acknowledgement form for a tenant. Energy Ombudsman can accept complaints that have happened within a period of six years. Green Deal complaints Energy Ombudsman can’t deal with. There are some complaints that Energy Ombudsman cannot deal with such as: Customer credit act-related complaints which should be handled by the Financial Ombudsman Service. Complaints that would be better handled by the energy regulator, the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (Ofgem). Complaints that would be better handled by enforcement or advocacy bodies such as Trading Standards or Citizens Advice. Complaints where the Green Deal provider has gone into liquidation. Consumers will need to contact the Secretary of State via the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. You can find out more information in the governments Green Deal Code of Practice. How to make a complaint about the Green Deal. Contact us for more help and advice on 0330 440 1624. What is District Heating? District Heating, sometimes known as Communal Heating, is a heat supply that is an alternative to gas. The technology has been developed to help reduce the carbon emissions within the United Kingdom in accordance with the Government’s commitments. A contract is usually formed between the District Heating supplier and the developer / housing association to use the heat technology within the premises. This is usually for a period in excess of 20 years, which means that a customer cannot transfer their supply to an alternative energy source, such as gas. To ensure that District Heating customers receive an efficient service from their heat supplier, a scheme called Heat Trust was created in November 2015. Although it’s a voluntary scheme, it’s supported by Government as a self-regulation initiative that recognises best practice. Heat Trust sets the customer service standards and customer protection requirements it expects District Heating suppliers that are a member of its service to provide. Do you handle complaints about District Heating providers? Ombudsman Services has been appointed as an ombudsman and investigation service for the Heat Trust Scheme. Our job is to help resolve complaints about District Heating providers, who are part of the Heat Trust scheme, if they’re unable or unwilling to help if something goes wrong. They are: E.ON Energy Solutions Ltd. SSE Heat Networks Ltd. Metropolitan King’s Cross (95 degrees). Metropolitan Infrastructure Ltd. East London Energy Ltd (Engie). Switch2 Energy Ltd. The Paintworks ESCO Ltd (Vital Energi). Energetik (Lee Valley Heat Network Operating Company Ltd). Loka Energy Ltd. Engie Urban Energy Ltd. Highland Bioheat Ltd. Veolia ICHL (Independent Community Heating Ltd) If you have a complaint with one of the above suppliers, Energy Ombudsman recommend that you contact the company in the first instance. If your complaint remains unresolved after eight weeks, you can escalate to us. District Heating complaints Energy Ombudsman can deal with. Ombudsman Services can look at complaints that relate to: Billing & payments. Customer service. Installation & delays. Loss of service. District Heating complaints Energy Ombudsman can’t deal with. Switching suppliers. Billing & payments relating to standing charges or a capital replacement fund charge. Billing and payments relating to the Energy Performance Certificate and charges within the final bill. How to make a complaint about the District Heating providers. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Information My business has received a court summons My business has received a court summons My business has received a court summons My business has received a court summons My business has received a court summon My business has received a court summon  business electricity business gas
My energy supplier is demanding large back dated payment Yes, Energy4 can help. Suppliers do not explain why this is occurring. We are very experienced in analysing and managing this type of situation. Often to a favourable resolution for our clients.  Sometimes energy suppliers make mistakes. We are experts at identifying any errors to provide you with independent checks.  With assistance we can confirm if the demand is valid. And then we assist with negotiating appropriate terms to settle the outstanding amount.  It’s much easier to begin negotiations to a successful outcome earlier in the process. So it’s best to contact us as soon as you’re aware of any issue. What are the back-billing rules? You can’t be charged for gas or electricity used more than 12 months ago if you have not been correctly billed for it before. Suppliers must make these terms clear in their contract terms and conditions. The rules apply to household and small business energy customers. They may not apply if you have behaved obstructively or unreasonably, preventing accurate billing. This could include: blocking meter readings at your property on more than one occasion stealing gas or electricity. If you get a back bill Contact your supplier if you get a bill for energy usage that’s for more than a year ago. Explain that you understand you are protected by the back-billing rules. You should only be charged for up to your last 12 months’ energy use if you haven’t had an accurate bill in over a year. To help, use this Citizens Advice back billing example letter. Make a complaint if your supplier continues to ask for the full amount. If you haven’t had an energy bill in over a year To help your supplier send you accurate bills, try to: provide regular meter readings tell them when you are moving in or out of a property. think about getting a smart meter. If you can’t pay a back bill If you think you can’t afford to pay, ask your supplier about repayment plan options. They must take into account how much you can afford. They will explain your options. Citizens Advice can also help if you can’t agree on a payment plan or if you’re not happy with the options the supplier has given to you. Call OfGem on 0808 223 1133 or use their online webchat. For textphone contact OfGem on dial 18001 followed by the helpline number. Mistakes are surprisingly common in energy bills, with Ofgem having issued £53 million in fines to the big six suppliers for bad billing practices. And when your supplier sends out the wrong bill, back billing is one way to make up the difference. Here’s what you need to know.

In this guide you’ll find information relating to:

  • What is back billing?

  • Back billing scenarios – why does back billing happen?

  • What are Ofgem’s back billing rules?

  • Back billing rules: FAQ

What is back billing? Back billing happens when an energy company hasn’t billed you correctly in the past for the energy you have used and then sends you a back-bill – also known as a back-dated bill – to recover the outstanding amount. Back-bills include all missed or underpaid charges for the relevant period. Unfortunately, these missing payments can really add up over time and suddenly lead to a high electric or gas bill. The average back-bill is £1,160 – which is a huge sum, especially when it’s unexpected – and it’s not uncommon for back-bills to run into many thousands of pounds. This is why you should always get in touch with your energy supplier immediately if you think that your bill is incorrect. Mistakes are surprisingly common in energy bills: Ofgem has issued over £20 million in fines to energy suppliers for faults that included billing problems over the last eight years. Fortunately, strict back billing rules have been introduced to regulate when back-dated bills are permitted. Back billing scenarios – why does back billing happen? The most common reasons for back-dated bills are as follows: Incorrect meter ID numbers: If the supplier has the wrong ID number in its records for your gas or electricity meter, you might end up paying for someone else’s energy. In some cases, this can result in an underpayment, which if left undetected could lead to a hefty back-bill in the future. Estimated meter readings: Many UK households use estimated meter readings as the basis of their bills, which can lead to either underpaying or overpaying throughout the year. If accurate readings aren’t periodically taken, long-term underpayment could occur, which could result in a back billing situation. Human error: One-off mistakes are probably the most common reason for back billing. Small slip-ups – like accidentally cancelling a Direct Debit – can cause the energy charges to pile up over several months before any discrepancy is noticed. When the missing amount is spotted, the energy supplier is likely to hit the customer with a back-bill for several months’ worth of payments. Faulty gas or electric meters: Suppliers are required to inspect meters every two years, but if you see a big change in your meter readings in the interim that can’t be explained by other circumstances, such as a mild winter or fewer occupants in the home, then it’s worth alerting your supplier in case you have a faulty gas or electricity meter. If your electricity or gas meter is faulty and you’ve been under-billed as a result, you will be responsible for paying for the outstanding amount. What are Ofgem’s back billing rules? In 2007, Ofgem put back billing rules into effect to prevent energy companies from trying to claw back debts that had accrued over a significant length of time. The Ofgem Back billing Principle states that an energy supplier does not have the right to seek payment for energy used over 12 months ago if you haven’t been correctly billed for it. There are many reasons why you might not have received a bill for the missing amount. These are some of the most common ones: You requested bills from your energy supplier, but they were never issued. An incorrect bill was issued due to a mix-up in meter reading information, and the energy supplier failed to correct the bill despite being notified of the error. You were billed using estimated meter readings rather than real readings taken by a professional meter reader or a member of your household. You reported issues with your meter or account, but your supplier didn’t resolve them. Your supplier didn’t respond promptly to problems with your method of payment. There are a few circumstances in which Ofgem’s back billing rules don’t apply. The regulator says that ‘if you have behaved obstructively or unreasonably, preventing accurate billing’ then you may not be covered. For instance, if you blocked meter readings being taken at your property on more than one occasion, you may still be liable for all energy used. The best way to prevent back billing is by ensuring that you receive accurate bills in the first place. Inform the supplier when you move in or out of a property and provide regular meter readings to reduce the chance of errors accumulating over time. Back billing rules: FAQ Here are a few common questions about the back billing rules and how they work. How long can an energy company back-date a bill? As stated in the back billing law, an energy supplier can only back-date a bill for 12 months. It can’t ask for payment for energy that was used over a year ago. These protections should be clearly explained in your energy supplier’s terms and conditions. What happens if you get a bill for energy that was used before you moved in? Contact your energy supplier to notify them of the issue immediately. Make sure you provide all relevant information, including the date you moved in. You should send a meter reading as soon as you take over any new property to ensure that you’re not charged for electricity or gas that you haven’t used. It’s also important to let your supplier know when you’re moving out so that they know who to bill for energy used in your previous residence. It will also give them the chance to set up gas and electricity in your new home if you’re not planning to switch your provider when you move. What should I do if my energy company isn’t following the back billing rules? There are clear procedures in place for handling back billing issues. Step 1: Contact your supplier When you receive a back-bill that you believe is incorrect, you should first contact the supplier and follow its complaints handling procedures. All energy suppliers will have an official process for complaints. Step 2: Contact Citizens Advice If speaking to your supplier doesn’t resolve the issue, contact Citizens Advice on 08454 04 05 06 who will advise you further. Step 3: Contact the Energy Ombudsman The final step is to contact the Energy Ombudsman for assistance and to make a formal complaint. This independent body investigates and mediates all back billing disputes on a case-by-case basis. When doesn’t the back billing code apply? In some cases, you will still be liable for a back-dated bill. The Ofgem Back billing Principle doesn’t apply in the following circumstances: You’ve deliberately avoided paying your bills. You moved into a new property and never contacted the energy supplier to arrange a new contract. You haven’t cooperated when asked to take meter readings or responded to requests for other meter details. The energy supplier has gone out of business. What happens if I can’t afford to pay my back-bill? If your back-dated bill is for energy used in the last 12 months, but it’s more than you can comfortably afford to pay, you should contact your energy supplier as soon as possible. Most electricity and gas companies understand that households often can’t afford to pay a large bill all at once and will set up payment plans to let you pay off your back-bill in instalments. In many cases, the supplier will agree to spread the bill over a similar period to the one over which the debt accumulated. For example, if your back-bill covers six months of underpayments, your energy company may offer you six months to pay them back. How can I prevent back billing? While some mistakes are out of your hands, the best way to avoid back billing is to do everything in your power to make sure your bills are accurate when you receive them. Start by taking regular meter readings. If the numbers seem way off one month in comparison to your usual amounts, you could have a faulty gas or electric meter. You can have this checked by asking your energy company to send an engineer to check your meter. It’s also a good idea to check the identifying information on your bill is correct each month, including your name, address and meter ID numbers. Something as minor as a misspelling could lead to billing errors, so it’s worth reporting any errors you spot straight away. Thankfully, as smart meters are rolled out across the country, back billing should become less common as suppliers automatically receive real-time meter readings and customers find it easier to monitor their own usage. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information My energy supplier is demanding large back dated payment My energy supplier is demanding large back dated payment  My energy supplier is demanding large back dated payment  My energy supplier is demanding large back dated payment  My energy supplier is demanding large back dated payment  My energy supplier is demanding large back dated payment My energy supplier is demanding large back dated payment  business electricity business gas
Renewal letter window – Be aware of the renewal letter window period for termination (For example: “if you wish to terminate your electricity or gas contract you must contact us in writing no sooner than 120 days and no later than 90 days before the anniversary of the contract signing date”) If you opt out during the renewal period no charges are applied. If notice is not given for cancellation, you will be automatically signed up for another year or agreed duration. The Renewal Letter will also state when you will need to tell you current supplier you wish to leave them Renewal is a large issue at present, Energy4 is here to help. Previously Energy4 has notified OfGem of Utility malpractice, and will continue to do so.
  • Ofgem found 18 suppliers failed to correctly protect customers’ tariff prices when they decided to switch supplier or tariff
  • Over 1 million customers were overcharged over £7.2 million for the failings
  • Collectively, the suppliers are issuing refunds and redress payments worth £10.4 million
Energy regulator Ofgem found 18 suppliers did not adhere to price protection rules, which protect a customer’s tariff price when they decide to either switch suppliers or tariffs after a price increase. Several of the suppliers self-reported the issue to Ofgem. All suppliers were then requested to self-assess their practices, which revealed that 18 suppliers were not compliant between 2013-2020. In total, over 1 million customers were overcharged over £7.2 million. The customers affected included:
  • those on a standard variable tariff who switched to another supplier but did not have their variable tariff price protected during the switch,
  • customers on a fixed-term tariff who switched to another supplier but did not have their fixed term tariff protected during the switch, and
  • customers on a fixed-term tariff who moved to another tariff with their supplier but did not have their fixed-term tariff protected during the switch.
Most of the failures were down to suppliers not having adequate arrangements in place to make sure the protections were applied in full when customers decided to switch. The suppliers have since agreed to refund all affected customers, and in some cases make goodwill payments, to the tune of £10.4 million. Where it has not been possible to process refunds, the suppliers have agreed to make payments to the energy redress fund. Ofgem made clear to suppliers that customers’ tariffs are protected while either switching suppliers or tariffs and they need to ensure their systems, processes and practices are fit for purpose. Ofgem expects all suppliers to ensure that they comply with these requirements and if further non-compliance is identified, Ofgem will be likely to take formal action. Anna Rossington, interim director of retail at Ofgem said: “Customers should have confidence in switching and not be overcharged when doing so. This case sends a strong message to all suppliers that Ofgem will intervene where customers are overcharged and ensure that no supplier benefits from non-compliance. “It also shows that, where appropriate, Ofgem is prepared to work with suppliers who have failed to comply with the rules, but who are willing to self-report issues and put things right for their customers.” Further information Further information 2 Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information business electricity business gas

Renewed my contract but I think I may be paying higher prices!

Energy4 has experience helping Clients when they either select high prices or renew contracts at prices which are typically around 25-30% more than the market rate.

Renewal prices are always higher. It is imperative that Business customers seek advice and utility supplier information before proceeding with contracts.

This is why our services are so important to helping your business reduce costs where possible.  With renewals of existing contracts (verbal or written) there is no ‘cooling off’ period.  The contract is binding immediately on your confirmation with your energy supplier.

Where Energy4 might be able to help is if your contract has been automatically renewed without your confirmation.

Contact Energy4 for more details about how Energy4 can submit a Notice of Termination on your behalf.  This will ensure you’re not automatically renewed and to move to a different supplier

OfGem has tried to prevent profiteering and mis-selling in  the industry. If you have issues with dubious contracts, please call Energy4.

Best Tariffs based on energy price cap

Energy price cap to increase in April but consumers should switch to save money

Big increase in wholesale energy prices push up price cap by £96 to £1,138 to pre-pandemic levels

The price cap continues to save consumers up to £100 a year and they can save up to £150 more by switching tariff

Support is available for those struggling to pay their energy bills, especially those in vulnerable circumstances

Ofgem has announced today that from 1 April 2021 the price cap will return to pre-pandemic levels, principally as a result of changes in wholesale energy prices.

When wholesale prices fell sharply last year in the wake of the first lockdown, the level of the price cap fell by £84 in October to its lowest level yet for the current winter period.

Demand for energy has since recovered which has pushed wholesale prices back up to more normal levels.

For six months from 1 April the price cap will increase by £96 to £1,138 for 11 million default tariff customers, and by £87 to £1,156 for 4 million pre-payment meter customers.

The price cap protects consumers who have not switched energy supplier by ensuring they pay a fair price for their electricity and gas.

Ofgem adjusts the level of the cap up or down twice a year to reflect the costs of supplying electricity and gas for suppliers.

Households on default tariffs are saving an estimated £75-£100 a year or £1 billion in total on their energy bills as a result.

Consumers who want to avoid the increase and save money should shop around ahead of the increase in the price cap on 1 April.

Jonathan Brearley, chief executive of Ofgem, said:

“Energy bill increases are never welcome, especially as many households are struggling with the impact of the pandemic. We have carefully scrutinised these changes to ensure that customers only pay a fair price for their energy.

“The price cap offers a safety net against poor pricing practices, saving customers up to £100 a year, but if they want to avoid the increase in April they should shop around for a cheaper deal.

“As the UK still faces challenges around COVID-19, during this exceptional time I expect suppliers to set their prices competitively, treat all customers fairly and ensure that any household in financial distress is given access to the support they need.

“The government and Ofgem have been working with the energy industry and consumer groups to support customers through this difficult time and I urge anyone worried about paying their energy bills to contact their supplier and access the help available.”

For the default tariff price cap level starting on 1 April, Ofgem has also allowed suppliers to claim £23 to cover higher levels of bad debt from more customers being unable to pay their energy bills due to the impact of COVID-19.

This will ensure suppliers can continue to supply energy and protect their customers, especially those in vulnerable circumstances.

Suppliers are required to provide emergency credit to customers struggling to top up their pre-payment meters, put those who are behind on their bills on affordable repayment plans and should not disconnect their customers.

Many have gone further in providing support over the last year, for example helping pre-payment meter customers who are shielding to top up.

Notes to editors

  1. Help available for consumers:

Ofgem rules require suppliers to offer emergency credit to pre-payment meter customers and put customers struggling to pay their energy bills on realistic and sustainable debt repayment plans based on their ability to pay.

If customers are struggling to pay for energy bills they should contact their energy supplier as soon as possible. Depending on their circumstances, customers may be eligible for extra help with their energy bills or services, such as payment breaks, suspending credit meter disconnections, and schemes like the Winter Fuel Payment or Warm Home Discount rebate.

The Citizens Advice consumer service can provide advice on how customers can resolve problems with their energy provider. For complex or urgent cases, or if a person is in a vulnerable situation they may then be referred onto the Extra Help Unit.

For help on how to switch to a better deal, see Ofgem’s guide.

  1. The price cap is a cap on a unit of gas and electricity, with standing charges taken into account. It is not a cap on customers’ overall energy bills, which will still rise or fall in line with their energy consumption.
  2. The £1,138 per year level of the cap is based on a household with typical consumption on a dual electricity and gas bill paying by direct debit. Customers who pay by standard credit (cash or cheque) pay an additional £85 based on the higher cost for suppliers to serve them. The additional allowance for COVID-19 bad debt (see below) does not apply to the pre-payment meter level of the cap, which explains the wider difference for the next price cap period. The values shown in the text above include VAT, and are expressed for the current Typical Domestic Consumption Values (TDCV) of 2,900kWh of electricity, 12,000kWh of gas, and 4,200kWh of electricity for Economy 7.
  3. Wholesale adjustment: Following a judicial review (JR), a judge ordered Ofgem to reconsider how we calculated wholesale energy costs for the first cap period when the default cap was introduced. We made a one-off £15 temporary wholesale adjustment for the current price cap period so suppliers can recover these costs. This adjustment will be removed for the next price cap period starting on 1 April. It does not apply to the prepayment level of the cap.
  4. COVID-19 bad debt: The default tariff price cap from 1 April includes an additional allowance to allow suppliers to start to recover some of their additional costs related to COVID-19, such as higher levels of bad debt from more customers being unable to pay their energy bills. This is based on a highly conservative assessment. In order to minimise the impact on consumers of higher bills, suppliers will have to recover some of the costs in a phased approach between April 2021 and March 2022. On Tuesday Ofgem published the additional allowance with benchmark consumption calculations as £23.69. Using new TDCV values the allowance is £23.14.
  5. From 1 October the equivalent per unit level of the price cap to the nearest pence for a typical customer paying by direct debit will be 19p per kWh for electricity customers and 3p per kWh for gas customers.
  6. Suppliers buy electricity and gas on the wholesale markets in advance, purchasing ‘forward contracts’ gradually over time. The default tariff price reflects suppliers’ costs because we use the wholesale prices of the relevant forward contracts that were sold in advance during an ‘observation window’ before each six-month price cap period.  The observation window for the summer price cap period (April – September) is the previous August – January. The observation window for the winter price cap period (October – March) is the previous February – July.  The graphs below show a) how wholesale gas and electricity prices for the relevant contracts on offer in each observation window result in an allowance that reflects suppliers’ average costs:
  7. Ofgem analysis at the time the default tariff cap was introduced on 1 January 2019 suggests that the default tariff price cap would have reduced the price of the average standard variable tariffs from the six largest suppliers by around £75 to £100 per year since April 2015 had it been in place over this period. The research shows suppliers have consistently charged more than the indicative level of the default tariff cap, which reflects the estimated costs of an efficient supplier. This analysis suggests had the cap not been introduced on 1 January 2019, customers would be paying significantly more. However, it is impossible to estimate an exact savings figure going forward as suppliers can no longer price above the level of the cap. Information and materials for consumers about the price caps is available at: www.ofgem.gov.uk/energy-price-caps.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Further information

Renewed my contract but I think I may be paying higher prices! Renewed my contract but I think I may be paying higher prices! Renewed my contract but I think I may be paying higher prices! Renewed my contract but I think I may be paying higher prices!

business electricity business gas

Renewing your energy contract is always more expensive. Switching supplier saves about 15-30% for business owners. Contact Energy4 for further information to help your business reduce costs where possible. With renewals of existing contracts (verbal or written) there is no ‘cooling off’ period and the contract is binding immediately on your confirmation with your energy supplier. Where we might be able to help is if your contract has been automatically renewed without your confirmation. Contact us for more details about how we can submit a Notice of Termination on your behalf to ensure you’re not automatically renewed and allowed to look towards different supplier Renewal is a large issue at present, Energy4 is here to help. Previously Energy4 has notified OfGem of Utility malpractice, and will continue to do so.
  • Ofgem found 18 suppliers failed to correctly protect customers’ tariff prices when they decided to switch supplier or tariff
  • Over 1 million customers were overcharged over £7.2 million for the failings
  • Collectively, the suppliers are issuing refunds and redress payments worth £10.4 million
Energy regulator Ofgem found 18 suppliers did not adhere to price protection rules, which protect a customer’s tariff price when they decide to either switch suppliers or tariffs after a price increase. Several of the suppliers self-reported the issue to Ofgem. All suppliers were then requested to self-assess their practices, which revealed that 18 suppliers were not compliant between 2013-2020. In total, over 1 million customers were overcharged over £7.2 million. The customers affected included:
  • those on a standard variable tariff who switched to another supplier but did not have their variable tariff price protected during the switch,
  • customers on a fixed-term tariff who switched to another supplier but did not have their fixed term tariff protected during the switch, and
  • customers on a fixed-term tariff who moved to another tariff with their supplier but did not have their fixed-term tariff protected during the switch.
Most of the failures were down to suppliers not having adequate arrangements in place to make sure the protections were applied in full when customers decided to switch. The suppliers have since agreed to refund all affected customers, and in some cases make goodwill payments, to the tune of £10.4 million. Where it has not been possible to process refunds, the suppliers have agreed to make payments to the energy redress fund. Ofgem made clear to suppliers that customers’ tariffs are protected while either switching suppliers or tariffs and they need to ensure their systems, processes and practices are fit for purpose. Ofgem expects all suppliers to ensure that they comply with these requirements and if further non-compliance is identified, Ofgem will be likely to take formal action. Anna Rossington, interim director of retail at Ofgem said: “Customers should have confidence in switching and not be overcharged when doing so. This case sends a strong message to all suppliers that Ofgem will intervene where customers are overcharged and ensure that no supplier benefits from non-compliance. “It also shows that, where appropriate, Ofgem is prepared to work with suppliers who have failed to comply with the rules, but who are willing to self-report issues and put things right for their customers.” Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information Further information 2 Renewing your energy contract Renewing your energy contract Renewing your energy contract business electricity business gas

Selecting a supplier by signature or verbal contract?

Energy4 offer a number of suppliers, who will accept contracts signed.

We use a well established contract signature process as many suppliers refuse to access verbal systems as a form of agreement for contract. This is because written contracts are still covered under Law, which are legally binding. Furthermore Banks demand that written information be performed on contracts in reference to the addition of Banking information for direct debits. This relates to Insurance and the HM Treasury that protects Banks and Consumers.

DO NOT agree anything over the telephone.

Large quantity of fraud occurs due to mis-selling contracts, agreeing one thing on the the telephone, and then altering the contract structure of standing charges, and unit values. If a supplier does not provide a contract by email, and demands signature within 10 minutes walk away.

True and False

  1. Verbal contracts are legally binding – Incorrect, only the director can agree the contract for utility contracts, or the legal registered owner. Evidence must also be provided in email or letter of what was agreed including evidence that the identity of the caller has been identified.
  2. Can save an organisation time and be efficient in the short term – Incorrect, Verbal contracts are the largest point of contention, and fraud at present perpetrated against businesses. 

Verbal contracts are Costly if criminal activity is involved, and problematic for business.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

OfGem information

Selecting a supplier by signature or verbal contract? Selecting a supplier by signature or verbal contract?

business electricity business gas

Smart Meter lies No 1 – Can the “Smart meter” charges placed on Customers be justified, specifically extra charges for using the Smart meter, and who owns the Smart meter technology, its cost, and justification? “…The Government (BEIS) own the smart metering policy framework, and have published a cost-benefit analysis…”.  This analysis however does not account for inflation, index rating, and currency valuation changes.  There is nothing Smart about this meter, the term was taken from Smart Grid, an idea for a system to be integrated into every consumer unit.  This also included switch gear across the UK, deactivating unrequired usage during power-grid failures, etc. “…Suppliers are expected to pass both costs and savings of the rollout through to their customers which, over time, should result in net savings…’.  Research shows no evidence of any requirement of suppliers to pass anything on to customers accept there attempt to offload the installation costs. ‘… In addition, the information provided by smart meters should help customers to better manage their energy use and reduce their energy consumption and costs…’.  This information has no relevance, and is directly linked to information from the Carbon Trust.  Industries can improve efficiencies on there process line, insulation, and smart lights can be added.  However, proper site maintenance and upgrading equipment helps to keep costs down. ‘…Energy suppliers are responsible for purchasing and installing smart meters for their customers. Individual energy suppliers procure their own smart meters from a number of different manufacturers, and they must meet technical specifications that are set out in regulation…’.  Currently OfGem has no standing on suppliers offloading installation costs to customers.  It appears they are following the route of less resistance with completing government policy, not the resulting fall-out.  This stance will only change if the Federation of Small Businesses, and other groups lobby government for legislative change. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Smart Meter lies No 1 business electricity business gas

Smart Meter lies No 2

Can suppliers charge extra charges when customers (shop owners) refuse the new Smart meters and want to keep the original meters? We have been notified that this is £25 per month!

“…Whilst we believe all consumers will benefit from having a smart meter, they aren’t compulsory, and you can choose not to have one…”

Currently suppliers are outright lying to customers by email, telephone, and foot-in-the-door hard sells. Smart meters are not compulsory. Report any criminality you come across to trading standards and OfGem immediately: Smartmetering@ofgem.gov.uk

“…However, suppliers are permitted to offer tariffs at different prices to different meter types, and are permitted to apply entry criteria to a tariff, such as having a smart meter…

Currently there is no evidence provided by industry of such special tariffs, which are in fact in contradiction with the Consumer Act. Customers presently on old meters are obtaining the same tariffs as new meters. Savings normally appear if Direct Debits are setup, and using online services to provide meter readings.

“…Choosing not to have a smart meter installed may mean you don’t have access to all the available tariffs on the market, some of which could be cheaper…”

Currently speculation at present, no documentation has been submitted by industry to concur these comments. Customers presently on old meters are obtaining the same tariffs as new meters. Savings normally appear if Direct Debits are setup, and using online services to provide meter readings.

It does not help OfGem or the Selling of Smart Meters if OfGem is blocking the reporting of defects. OfGem response

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Smart Meter lies No 2

business electricity business gas

Smart Meter lies No 3 – What charges can be imposed by the installers, and are charges meant to be taken on by the utility provider, not directly charged to customers? “…For domestic customers, there must be no up-front charge for a smart meter installation. As is currently the case with traditional meters, part of consumers’ bills will be made up of the costs associated with providing and maintaining meters…” “…For non-domestic customers, as for traditional metering, energy suppliers can make their own decisions about how they charge customers for metering services and different suppliers take different approaches. Customers should engage with their supplier to discuss any possible installation charges, and could also consider switching to another supplier, or approaching a third party meter supplier…” By June 2025, every home in the UK will have been offered the chance to get a smart meter. This technological advance will help you to keep track of your energy usage, get more accurate readings, and understand why you pay what you do for energy. These features may save you money, but all good things have their drawbacks – and smart meters are no different. In a 2019 Uswitch survey, 31% of homes reported issues with their smart meter, so you should be prepared for certain problems. And if you’re unsure about smart meters, don’t worry – there’s another way to cut costs. You can save more than £400 each year, just by switching your home’s energy supplier. If you’re looking to cut down your bills, this one’s a bit of a no-brainer. That’s why we’ve partnered with Switchd. With four different price plans (including a free option), Switchd will find you cheaper, greener energy suppliers in no time. Smart displays can stop responding 39% of people said their smart displays had simply stopped working in the aforementioned Uswitch survey. This makes it practically impossible to use your smart meter. In some cases, you’ll be able to use a connected app that can perform the same functions while you get the meter replaced. But either way, it’s not ideal for four out of 10 people to suffer this fault. After all, if your smart device doesn’t work, it’s not very smart. The installation can take hours and leave you with no power Smart technology is relatively seamless, but when it comes to smart meters, they still need to be fitted by a professional. This can take hours, during which time you’ll need to go without electricity. It may be a minor inconvenience in the grand scheme of things, but it’s still a drag that such a small, advanced piece of hardware can turn your plans for a day upside down. The whole machine can stop functioning It’s bad enough when most of your electrical devices shut down, but when the machine which measures your energy usage refuses to work, it can cause a plethora of problems. You’ll need to contact your energy company to let them know, then endure a period of time without a smart meter, and then deal with yet another installation. This’ll mean carving out some time in your day to be home for an installation, and spending yet another couple of hours without electricity, all so you can get back to where you started. The meter may stop being smart after you switch provider Changing suppliers is one of the best ways to save money on your energy bills – but if it causes your meter to lose its smart abilities, the switch can feel like it wasn’t worth it. And why would you bother getting a smart meter if it’s going to suddenly act like an old-fashioned meter? This is another instance in which you’ll need to go through the rigmarole of getting a new smart meter, with all the kerfuffle that comes with getting installed and having the power off for hours. It won’t save you money or fight climate change by itself Smart meters can cut your energy bills, and in doing so help reduce your contribution to climate change, but they can’t do it by themselves. You’ll still need to regularly check the meter’s data and adjust your usage accordingly, whether that’s by remembering to turn lights off in rooms you aren’t using, or by having shorter showers. They’re smart, but they’re not going to win a Nobel Prize any time soon. Your machine may not connect to the internet Smart meters currently report your usage through mobile networks, which can be unreliable in certain areas, particularly if you live in a rural location. This can lead to readings not being sent, which can lead to confusion over bills for both you and your energy company. Soon, all meters will be connected to a wireless network made specially for them – and if you live in an area with an unreliable mobile network, you may want to wait until then. Smart meters can be confusing and anxiety-producing Meters can help you to track your energy usage – but constantly being aware of how much you’re spending has a downside, particularly for older people on a fixed income. Some can feel anxiety as they watch the numbers tick up, fall into a panic, and turn off the lights and heating to save money. This is exacerbated by some of the perplexing jargon on smart meters. Most people aren’t familiar with the notion of kilowatt hours, for instance, and though devices will come with instruction manuals, this won’t always help. A better solution may simply be for you to stay aware of your energy usage, and check energy comparison sites to make sure you’re getting the best deal. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information  Smart Meter lies No 3 Smart Meter lies No 3 business electricity business gas
Smart Meter lies No 4 – The great smart meter revolution has faltered and households can choose, once again, to opt out and keep hold of their old-fashioned utility meters which require manual reading. When they were introduced in 2009, smart meters were supposed to simplify the billing process and ensure readings were up to date and accurate. But the roll-out has been plagued with problems – as explained below. Now, according to research conducted by comparethemarket.com, one in five people do not want one. The Government had originally said that every household would be set up with a smart meter by 2020 – and nearly seven million have been installed so far – but in June the Government subtly downgraded this requirement. Now every home will be “offered” a smart meter by 2020, with no obligation to take one. The controversy around smart meters is more so because it is the Government’s job to set overall energy policy, not the job of suppliers, and the move away from carbon-based energy sources, the national roll-out of smart meters, and the expansion of renewables and nuclear power has cost consequences, with the consumer expected to pick up the tab. Every household will, ultimately, pay for the new meter roll-out via their bills. As energy companies are quick to say, this is one reason why bills are rising. But should you get one? These are six key considerations. It is the Government’s job to set overall energy policy, not the job of suppliers Credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire 1) Smart meters could make it harder to switch gas and electricity providers Early adopters of smart meters got a nasty shock when they later tried to switch energy provider. Some of the “first generation” smart meters fitted in households are currently incompatible with a new national communications network – which is how your usage data is transmitted to the energy provider. Meters not connected to this system “go dumb” when consumers switch suppliers, meaning their new smart meters are no better than the old-fashioned ones. Customers would have to submit readings manually as before – something which can actually be more difficult with a “smart-meter-turned-dumb” than an old-fashioned meter. The Government and Smart Energy GB, the body tasked with promoting the rollout of smart meters, insist the original meters will eventually connect with the network. However, insiders at some of the large energy companies have said they may need to be replaced. (1) 2) Smart meters don’t bring an end to estimated bills (or billing errors) For many homeowners, who believed they would gain even more control over their bills, the introduction of a smart meter has been a disappointment. The majority of energy providers encourage customers to pay via annual payment plans, where their yearly usage is estimated in advance and the cost split into 12 payments. This means that millions of bills still refer to “estimated” use, even where customers have smart meters. It also means that many customers are, as before, have credits on their accounts of hundreds of pounds. Errors with meters also mean that wrong information is being sent and acted upon by suppliers. Angela Forman, who lives in East Sussex, agreed to have a smart meter installed after being told it would remove the need to send monthly meter readings. She had been on an Economy 7 tariff, which takes separate readings in day and night, when energy demand and cost is lower. However when she received her first bill under the smart system it was for £114, much higher than her usual £94. Her meter had a fault and was sending her energy company an estimated reading, actively costing her money. And horror stories have swamped social media of customers being billed tens of thousands of pounds incorrectly. Mark Umpleby tweeted SSE with a photo that said he had used £33,183 of gas in one day – 2,765,175 per cent over budget. Another customer, Usman Hussain, tweeted a picture of his meter saying he would be charged nearly £9,600 for his day’s electricity and gas. (1) 3) Smart meters won’t work if you have a poor signal in your area The successful operation of smart meters can also be a postcode lottery. Live in an area with poor mobile signal? There’s a chance your smart meter won’t work. This was the issue for Mrs Forman. The mobile reception was not good enough, which forced her smart meter to revert to “dumb mode” and send estimated readings. Another reader, Suzanne Harvey, had a smart meter installed in 2014 and was told by the engineer who fitted it that the poor reception might create difficulties. This proved to be the case and she failed to receive a bill for almost a year. Smart Energy GB expects the rollout of the national network to make the meters independent of mobile coverage – effectively fixing this problem. (1) 4) The display units linked to smart meters are crude and difficult to understand Many have complained that the “smart interface” of their meter – the device which sits inside the house and displays data about usage and cost – is difficult to understand. The hope is that mobile apps will be developed which are more user-friendly. Ovo, one of the newer providers and an advocate of smart meters, has an app which shows usage and readings updated by week. It also shows any current balance as well as usage and cost over recent months. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information
Ofgem information Further information from Ofgem Further information 1 Smart Meter lies No 4 Smart Meter lies No 4 Smart Meter lies No 4 Smart Meter lies No 4 Smart Meter lies No 4 Smart Meter lies No 4 Smart Meter lies No 4 Smart Meter lies No 4

Smart Meter lies No 5

Energy companies are using high-pressure tactics to push customers into having smart meters in their homes.  They schedule dates to fit them without being asked and threaten to take away cheap deals.  Suppliers have been ordered by the UK Government to offer smart meters to all households in Britain by 2020 deadline.  Or the suppliers will face fines.  Customers are not obliged to say ‘yes’ and can refuse to have one installed.

But Money Mail has been inundated with letters from readers who feel pressured into having one of the new meters.  They are  misled into thinking that they are compulsory.  Energy companies are using high-pressure tactics of hard selling to push customers into having optional smart meters in their homes

They tell us they have been bombarded with calls, texts and letters even after they have refused one.  At least one major firm is sending out letters saying they have made a smart meter installation appointment, despite the customer never requesting one.  Another says this is something they are trialling. If customers do not want a new meter, they have to call and cancel, or an engineer will just turn up.

There are two types of smart meter: first and second generation. You may see these referred to as SMETS1 and SMETS2, respectively. The type you have depends mainly on when you had it fitted. Issues with smart-meter installations and how they work have come to light throughout the smart meter roll-out so far. Here we’ve listed the problems we’ve heard about most often and what you can do about them. We worked with Smart Energy GB, the smart meter consumer-information campaign, and spoke to energy firms to compile these tips. Second-generation meters are now being installed which should not have many of these problems, though at the moment, more business owners have first-generation smart meters. My smart meter is not working after I switched supplier Depending on which company you switch to, and when you switch, your meter may lose its smart functionality. Check with your new supplier before you switch. If you do lose smart functionality, in the short term you’ll have to send meter readings to your energy firm again – they’ll stop being sent automatically. This is a risk if you have a first-generation smart meter. However your smart meter should become smart again in future. So far, more than four million first-generation smart meters have been connected to the same wireless network that second-generation meters use. Once connected, your meter’s smart functions should be restored. If you switch again in future, your meter should also keep its smart functions. You don’t need to do anything to get your meter upgraded and connected to the wireless network. It will happen automatically. Meters which have lost their smart functions are being prioritised. Exactly when your meter will be connected to the wireless network depends on your energy supplier, the brand of meter and software it’s using. Some types can be connected now, and the final tests for upgrading some meters is still taking place, according to government. Some energy firms are telling customers when their meters are connected. This should solve the problem for the majority of smart meters which have stopped working. The very small number of smart meters which can’t be upgraded will need to be replaced. I want to switch energy supplier but I’m worried my smart meter will stop working It’s possible to switch supplier with your first-generation smart meter and keep it smart. Second-generation smart meters should not lose their smart functions when you switch because they’re connected to the central wireless network which all energy suppliers should be able to use. Some companies can operate first-generation smart meters from rival suppliers, even if they haven’t been connected to the central wireless network yet. This may be because they use compatible technology or the same brand of meter or have agreements in place. If retaining smart functionality is important to you, check with a new supplier before you switch that it will be able to get automatic meter readings from your first-generation smart meter. If your smart meter cannot be connected to the wireless network, it may be willing to replace your existing smart meter with a new one. My smart meter stopped working after my energy firm stopped trading If your energy supplier goes bust you will be automatically moved to another energy firm. If your energy firm is bought by another company, you often become the customer of the acquiring firm too. This can result in your smart meter losing its smart functions. This is most likely to happen if you have a first-generation smart meter than is not yet connected to the central wireless network and the new supplier cannot read it. Your meter should become smart again in future once it is connected to the central wireless network so your supplier can read it. Your business owner meter display should start working fully again at this time too. How to read a smart meter Smart meters send meter readings to your energy supplier automatically. So you should not need to take smart meter readings. But if your smart meter stops working in smart mode, you’ll need to take manual meter readings again. Some business owner meter displays show your meter readings. You’ll usually need to scroll through the different screens to find them. You can also find your meter reading on your smart electricity meter and gas smart meter. Most smart meters have a button to illuminate the digital display so you can read the numbers. Some might require you to press several buttons. Check the instructions that your smart meter installer gave you if you’re not sure. Your energy supplier’s website may also have instructions. If not, ask your supplier for instructions. My energy supplier isn’t getting meter readings from my smart meter Check if your energy supplier is having connectivity issues. You might need to submit readings manually to ensure you’re billed accurately while problems are resolved. Most problems should be resolved when all smart meters use the DCC wireless network, covering 99.25% of Great Britain. If your first-generation smart meter stopped working when you switched supplier, read the section above to find out what you can do. My business meter display is not working The displays work best when close to the smart meter. If your meters are inaccessible or outside, ask your energy supplier for advice. Check if your business owner meter display has a flat battery or is unplugged. Check the instruction booklet for troubleshooting tips, and contact your energy supplier if the problem persists. If you have your business owners meter display for less than 12 months and it has broken, your supplier may be able to replace it free of charge. You may need to pay if you damaged it. Smart meters need to be able to connect via a wireless network to your business owners meter display so you can see how much energy you’re using. A ‘hub’ is installed with your smart meter (often built into the meter) to do this. The current hubs will work in most properties, according to government research. If your business is particularly large, or you live in a flat (where your business owners meter display is some distance from the smart meter), you are more likely to have problems. A new hub is being developed (called Alt HAN), which should work in the 3-6% of business owners that experience such problems; it’s expected to be available for installation in 2021. If your smart meter has also stopped working (for example, if you switched energy supplier) this can affect your business owners meter display too. As well as being unable to read your smart meters, your new energy firm likely won’t be able to send the pricing information about your new tariff to your business owners meter display. It should still show your gas and electricity use in real time though. Your business owners meter display should work fully again when your smart meters are connected to the national wireless network. Do not throw away your business owners meter display. They are covered by the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment recycling regulations (WEEE) which mean that energy suppliers should recondition and reuse business owners meter displays as much as they can. The smart meter won’t work with my solar panels We’ve heard from members with solar panels who have been refused a smart meter, and from others who have had a smart meter installed that doesn’t work with their solar panels. The Government Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) told us that all smart (SMETS) meters can measure energy consumed (imported) and exported back into the grid. New tariffs which pay you for exporting solar electricity to the national grid require you to have a meter that can give half-hourly readings – generally this will be a smart meter. Find out if these tariffs are right for you in our guide to the Smart Export Guarantee explained. Smart Energy GB explains that business owners meter displays will only show how much energy you’re buying from your supplier, but not necessarily energy you generate. They may be able to do this in future. (Solar panel owners already have a PV-generation meter that tells them how much electricity their system is generating.) If you have solar panels and are offered a smart meter, make sure your supplier is aware. Check whether your smart meter and business owners meter display will work fully with them. My bills are inaccurate with my smart meter A smart meter sends your meter readings to your energy supplier automatically, so in principle your bills should be more accurate than when they rely on you submitting manual readings. If you had a faulty old meter, or did not submit meter readings and got estimated bills, you might find that your payments change. If your meter was faulty, an energy company can charge you retrospectively for the previous year if you have paid too little. If you’ve paid too much, your supplier has to refund you for the whole period that the meter was faulty. Find out what to do if you think your electric or gas meter is faulty. However, if you’re concerned that your bills are wrong, or your smart meter is showing an error message, contact your supplier. It is responsible for making sure your meter works properly. If it can’t resolve the issue remotely, it should send someone round to take a look. Can my supplier switch my meter to prepayment? Suppliers sometimes install prepayment meters for customers who are in debt. With smart meters, it’s possible for energy suppliers to switch your meter into prepayment mode remotely. Energy firms are only allowed to switch customers to prepay for energy where they have checked that it’s appropriate to do so. Your energy supplier must give you seven days’ notice before it switches your smart meter to prepayment mode. If you think your supplier has moved you to prepayment unfairly, you should complain to it first. If the issue isn’t resolved after eight weeks, you can take your complaint to the energy ombudsman. For help changing to direct debit payments, find out is a prepayment meter right for you? My gas and electricity meters are hard to access If your meter is in a small cupboard or another confined space, then a technician might struggle to install your smart meter. They may ask you to dismantle the cupboard or move other obstacles to reach the meter. If your meter is partly concealed in a case outside, then your energy company might not be able to replace it yet. We’ve heard from members whose energy firms aren’t yet replacing these ‘semi-concealed’ meters. If your meter is positioned very high up, make sure you let your energy company know, so it’s prepared. Find out more about getting smart meters installed. Do smart meters give off radiation? Some people have complained about the impact of smart meters on their health, in particular those suffering from electromagnetic sensitivity or electromagnetic hypersensitivity. The evidence to date suggests that exposure to radio waves produced by smart meters does not pose a risk to health. A 2017 study of a selection of smart meters available in Great Britain found that exposure to radio waves from smart meters is below guidelines set by the international body for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. It also found that smart meters expose people to radio waves less than mobile phones and wi-fi equipment.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information Further information 2 business electricity business gas Smart Meter lies No 5 Smart Meter lies No 5 Smart Meter lies No 5 Smart Meter lies No 5 Smart Meter lies No 5 Smart Meter lies No 5
Smart Meter lies No 6 – Do they really save you money? Smart meters use wireless signals to communicate with your supplier, which means you don’t have to ring in meter readings.  You will be able to see how much power you are using by the hour in pounds and pence on the meter’s small, computer-like screen.  There is no charge to have one fitted.  It shouldn’t take an engineer longer than an hour to install.  Officials claim they will help you to save money, as you’ll be more aware of how much energy different appliances use — and reduce your consumption. These digital meters will also ensure you are only billed for the power you’ve used, putting an end to estimated bills.  Most big energy companies are writing to customers to offer them one of the new smart meters.  However, some are only offering them in certain areas of the country and many smaller firms are not yet fitting them, so you may have to wait.  As many as one in three households is also being told they can’t have a meter because it won’t work in their property.  For example, if the walls are too thick, or they live in a rural area with poor mobile phone signal. One reader, who didn’t want to be named, reveals her elderly mother was bewildered when EDF Energy sent a letter saying it had booked an appointment for a smart meter to be fitted in her home, even though she hadn’t asked for one.  She says: ‘It’s misleading to just send out a letter with an appointment date and time. The wording suggested that all households had to have one.’ Andy Hookway, 57, a retired policeman from Plymouth, had a similar experience with EDF Energy.  He said: ‘I said I didn’t want a smart meter, but they ignored this and sent me an appointment.  I called to cancel and then, the day before, they sent me a text reminder, so I called again.  Yet the engineer still showed up. When I turned him away, he said this happened to him at least every other day.’ EDF has apologised to both customers for any inconvenience. Marnee and Keith Pringle, from Grantham, Lincolnshire, say they were told by E.ON that their off-peak rate would end — causing their electricity bills to soar from £1,820 to £3,086 a year — unless they switched to a smart meter.  The letter they received read: ‘To stay on a tariff with cheaper off-peak rates you need a different meter, and we’ll install a smart meter.  The couple, who are both retired insurance brokers, already face high bills, as they live in an area with no gas supply. Marnee, 69, says: ‘I feel like we’ve been backed into a corner.  We live in a cottage with thick walls and poor mobile phone signal, so what will happen if they can’t fit one? Are we still going to be charged the higher tariff?’ Greg and Nina Stevens, both 68, from Northamptonshire, received a similar letter from E.ON, telling them their off-peak tariff would end and their bills would rise ‘significantly’ unless they had a new meter fitted. Smart meters automatically send readings to your provider over a wireless connection. It means the end of estimated bills.  When Money Mail intervened, E.ON admitted that neither the Pringles nor the Stevens had to have to have a smart meter fitted.  They could continue to get their off-peak tariffs if they had new analogue meters installed.  E.ON also apologised for the wording of its letter. Allison Rogers, 54, a depot manager, also from Northamptonshire, says she is fed up with receiving texts from her supplier, Scottish Power. ‘I have had numerous texts telling me to contact them to arrange for a smart meter to be fitted,’ she says.  ‘They didn’t ask if I wanted one. They have now put a note on my file to say I don’t want one, but the lady I called said that I would eventually have to have one installed.’  Scottish Power has apologised for its actions. Robert Mitchell, 81, a retired IT contractor from Birmingham, was called by Sainsbury’s Energy, part of British Gas, to say his meter was due for replacement, although it was just a few years old. ‘It wasn’t a question of whether or not I wanted one. It was like they were just letting me know I had to have one,’ he says. Geoff and Jenny Payne, 68 and 65, from Kent, say: ‘We had a stream of emails and phone calls from British Gas. In the end, we became thoroughly sick of the matter and told them to stop contacting us.’  British Gas says: ‘If a customer tells us they do not want a smart meter, we stop sending them communications.’ A spokesman for EDF says that its approach of sending out smart meter appointments has been endorsed by the watchdog, Ofgem.  The spokesman added: ‘Customers are not obliged to accept the appointment and can rearrange or cancel by contacting us by phone or online.’  An E.ON spokesman says: ‘Smart meters offer a number of benefits for customers. However, they are not compulsory and we’re reviewing our communications to ensure this is made clearer.’  Scottish Power’s exclamation mark symbol on its letters is ‘a standard prompt on customer communications to denote that action is required’.   An Ofgem spokeswoman says: ‘It is not compulsory to have a smart meter installed — consumers have a right to decline them and suppliers must not mislead them.’ (1) (1) By Leah Milner For The Daily Mail  – Published: 22:01, 26 September 2017 | Updated: 11:34, 27 September 2017 Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Smart Meter lies No 6 – Do they really save you money? business electricity business gas
Smart Meter Lies No 7 – How this money can’t help you? Suppliers send out letters and texts to customers that fail to make it clear that smart meters are optional. EDF Energy is texting customers:  ‘We need to upgrade your meter to a smart meter’. E.ON send out letters that state in bold, red type: ‘Reminder: your meter is being phased out’. Scottish Power’s letters say ‘Action required’ next to a large, red exclamation mark. Some E.ON customers have even been told they face losing their cheap deal if they refuse to have a new meter.  In 2017, the supplier said it would replace its expensive standard tariffs with rolling deals that cost up to £262 a year less, but only if customers get a smart meter first. These meters automatically send readings to your provider over a wireless connection. It means the end of estimated bills, and customers will be able to see more clearly how much energy they use, helping them to r, educe their costs.  The UK Government ordered suppliers to offer optional smart meters to all households.  As many as one in five UK households says they do not want one. Some are concerned about how their personal data will be used. Others don’t want the hassle of waiting in for an engineer to call.  Many are reluctant, after learning, that most of the 7.36 million meters already installed will stop working if you switch to a different supplier. Money Mail does understand that this problem will be fixed.  Without an engineer needing to visit a software update will be possible.  But no details have been confirmed so far. (1)  (1) By Leah Milner For The Daily Mail  – Published: 22:01, 26 September 2017 | Updated: 11:34, 27 September 2017 Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Smart Meter Lies No 7 – How this money can’t help you? Smart Meter Lies No 7 – How this money can’t help you? Smart Meter Lies No 7 – How this money can’t help you? business electricity business gas
Terminating utility services. It is the term used by the energy industry to describe giving notice that you do not want to be automatically renewed at the end of your current contract.  Normally they ask this to be done by writing or email. Terminating utility services does not mean your electricity or gas will be disconnected. Terminating utility services is what occurs during the process of moving supplier. The business owner once signing and agreeing to a new contract with a new supplier must notify there present supplier following the 30 days+ notice period. This is referred to as Terminating. Utility services can also be disconnected or diverted. Disconnected occurs if the site has gone or the meter has been removed. Diverted occurs if the site has changed and the incomer is being extended or moved to another part of the site. Energy4 can help log your Notice of Termination with your Energy supplier at the right time. Since 2013 Energy4 has noticed attempts by many utility companies to prevent Business owners from moving to other suppliers even when termination notices are given. Normal practices are claiming the Business client has Debts, Issues with supply links, incorrect information, Allowing Business owners too leave on the day of Contract End Date or the Day After, rotating these requirements to obtain a few extra days payment before the supply ends.. OfGem has made it very clear that preventing Business owners from moving to any supplier they choose on fabricated reasons will not be tolerated. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information 1 Terminating utility services business electricity business gas

Verbal contract over the telephone Energy4 offer a number of suppliers, who will accept contracts signed.

We use a well established contract signature process as many suppliers refuse to access verbal systems as a form of agreement for contract. This is because written contracts are still covered under Law, which are legally binding. Furthermore Banks demand that written information be performed on contracts in reference to the addition of Banking information for direct debits. This relates to Insurance and the HM Treasury that protects Banks and Consumers.

DO NOT agree anything over the telephone.

Large quantity of fraud occurs due to mis-selling contracts, agreeing one thing on the the telephone, and then altering the contract structure of standing charges, and unit values. If a supplier does not provide a contract by email, and demands signature within 10 minutes walk away.

True and False

  1. Verbal contracts are legally binding – Incorrect, only the director can agree the contract for utility contracts, or the legal registered owner. Evidence must also be provided in email or letter of what was agreed including evidence that the identity of the caller has been identified.
  2. Can save an organisation time and be efficient in the short term – Incorrect, Verbal contracts are the largest point of contention, and fraud at present perpetrated against businesses.

Verbal contracts are Costly if criminal activity is involved, and problematic for business.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

OfGem information

Verbal contract over the telephone

business electricity business gas

What criteria businesses do need to meet to be levied at 5 percent VAT? To qualify for VAT exemption the site has to be either:
  • For domestic use
  • A building, or part of a building, which consists of a dwelling or number of dwellings
  • A building, or part of a building, used for a residential purpose
  • A home or other institution providing residential accommodation for children
  • A home or other institution providing residential accommodation with personal care for persons in need of personal care by reason of old age, disablement, past or present dependence on alcohol or drugs or past or present medical disorder
  • A hospice
  • A residential accommodation for students or school pupils
  • Residential accommodation for members of any of the armed forces
  • A monastery, nunnery or similar establishment
  • An institution which is the sole or main residence of at least 90% of its residents
  • Except use as a hospital, a prison or similar institution, a hotel, inn or similar establishment
  • Self catering holiday accommodation
  • A caravan
  • A houseboat
  • A charity otherwise than in the course of furtherance of a business
  • Where there is a supply of goods or services partly for domestic or charitable endeavours
  • If at least 60% of the goods or services qualify (meet the aforementioned criteria the whole shall be treated as meeting the criteria)
There are two more common types of contracts for businesses, 28 day rolling contracts and the Deemed Rates contracts VAT rates There are 3 different rates of VAT and you must make sure you charge the right amount. Get a list of reduced or zero-rated goods and services. Standard rate Most goods and services are standard rate. You should charge this rate unless the goods or services are classed as reduced or zero-rated. This includes any goods below the distance selling threshold you supply from Northern Ireland to non-VAT registered EU customers. If you go over the threshold, you’ll have to register for VAT in that country. Reduced rate When you charge this rate can depend on what the item is as well as the circumstances of the sale, for example:
  • Children’s car seats and domestic fuel or power are always charged at 5%
  • Mobility aids for older people are only charged at 5% if they’re for someone over 60 and the goods are installed in their home
Zero rate Zero-rated means that the goods are still VAT-taxable but the rate of VAT you must charge your customers is 0%. You still have to record them in your VAT accounts and report them on your VAT Return. Examples include:
  • Books and newspapers
  • Children’s clothes and shoes
  • Motorcycle helmets
  • Most goods you export from England, Wales and Scotland (Great Britain) to a country outside the UK
  • Most goods you export from Northern Ireland to a country outside the EU and the UK
  • Goods you supply from Northern Ireland to a VAT registered EU business – you can check if the VAT number is valid
  • If you sent goods to the EU from Northern Ireland, you’ll need their VAT number and paperwork proving that the goods have been sent within certain time limits (usually 3 months).
  • Businesses and charging VAT: VAT rates – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information What criteria businesses do need to meet to be levied at 5 percent VAT? business electricity business gas
Energy4 do most of the work in regards to the switching process but you need to send a letter of termination to your existing supplier in order to avoid being rolled over by them You need to find out what your suppliers rules are about termination as each supplier has their own T&C’s you signed up to The easiest way to switch suppliers is to let us do the work and you sit back and look after your company From 1 May consumers will automatically receive £30 if they experience delays or mistakes when switching supplier New compensation requirements from Ofgem will protect consumers and further boost confidence in the switching process This follows switching compensation payments introduced last year, which have already delivered over £700,000 to customers Customers will receive an automatic £30 payment from suppliers if they are switched by mistake, if their switch takes longer than 15 working days, or if their final bill doesn’t arrive within 6 weeks1. The new requirements, which come in on 1 May, will give customers further peace of mind that they will be compensated if something goes wrong when they switch. They should also serve as a wake-up call for suppliers to cut out problems for customers and get switching right first time. From 1 May 2020, customers whose switch does not complete within 15 working days, or who are switched by a supplier by mistake, will receive the payment from the new supplier. The supplier the customer is switching away from must pay out if it fails to issue a final bill within six weeks of a switch. Ofgem introduced the first batch of compensation payments last year2, meaning suppliers must pay out if they fail to meet minimum standards around spotting and correcting mistaken switches, or refunding credit balances to customers. Since then, customers have already received over £700,000 from suppliers. Of these payments, 27% have been for mistaken switches, while 73% have been for late credit balance refunds. Mary Starks, executive director for Consumers and Markets at Ofgem, said: “More customers are switching than ever, with a record 6.4 million changing supplier in 2019. But we also know that a minority can still experience problems when they switch. “As part of our commitment to protecting consumers and enabling competition, we are introducing these new standards to give customers further peace of mind, and to challenge suppliers to get it right first time. “Going forward, we will continue working with suppliers and consumer groups to deliver our programme for faster and more reliable switching and ensure these arrangements are fit for the future”. Minister for Energy and Clean Growth Kwasi Kwarteng said: “We’ve made it easier than ever for consumers to shop around and record numbers are now switching suppliers to save on their bills. “These tough new standards will ensure switching is as smooth as possible and consumers are always protected.” Notes 1 – In September 2019, Ofgem consulted on these new compensation payments (known as Guaranteed Standards), and published the final decision on 12 February 2020. The new standards will take effect from 01 May 2020. 2 – These new Guaranteed Standards are part of Ofgem’s programme of work to deliver faster and more reliable switching. In 2019 Ofgem introduced the first tranche of Guaranteed Standards, requiring suppliers to pay compensation if they fail to meet minimum standards regarding how promptly credit balances are refunded to customers, as well as forcing suppliers to pay compensation if they were too slow in identifying, rectifying, and notifying customers of “erroneous transfers” (when people are switched by mistake). Both the gaining supplier and the losing supplier must pay compensation if they fail to agree that an erroneous transfer has occurred (within 20 working days), if the contacted supplier fails to provide notification to this customer of this decision (within 20 working days), and to the customer’s original supplier if they fail to re-register the customer promptly (within 21 working days). This first tranche of Guaranteed Standards took effect on 1 May 2019. The new Guaranteed Standards introduced in May this year in the second tranche will require the gaining supplier to make a compensation payment if a customer is erroneously switched to them. This Guaranteed Standard was held over from the previous tranche in order for us to identify which supplier was most likely to be responsible for an erroneous switch. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information What do you have to do for the switching process? business electricity business gas
What happens during transfer to another energy supplier? On receipt of a customer’s signed contract, the energy supplier will normally write (at some point) to confirm details and enclose the T&Cs.  Sometimes this is known as the ‘Welcome Pack` or a letter.  At the same time, the new energy supplier will apply through an independent agency, to take over the supply. The old energy supplier may object because of : a) A debt on the account. b) The customer is still in contract on the day the new energy supplier has applied to take over. b) No TERMINATION NOTICE was received, received too early, or received too late. On further checking, the date issue can normally be resolved, but an aged debt must be settled before the old energy supplier will release a customer. If timely TERMINATION NOTICE was not provided, then the old energy supplier is normally entitled to block the transfer.  We contact you 7 days before the transfer date to request a meter read. We also ask you to forward a copy of your final billing, which we reconcile with the first bill from your new supplier.  In our experience around 30% of transfers have meter related problems – so we carry on checking until we are satisfied. Energy4 do most of the work in regards to the switching process but you need to send a letter of termination to your existing supplier in order to avoid being rolled over by them You need to find out what your suppliers rules are about termination as each supplier has their own T&C’s you signed up to The easiest way to switch suppliers is to let us do the work and you sit back and look after your company From 1 May consumers will automatically receive £30 if they experience delays or mistakes when switching supplier New compensation requirements from Ofgem will protect consumers and further boost confidence in the switching process This follows switching compensation payments introduced last year, which have already delivered over £700,000 to customers Customers will receive an automatic £30 payment from suppliers if they are switched by mistake, if their switch takes longer than 15 working days, or if their final bill doesn’t arrive within 6 weeks1. The new requirements, which come in on 1 May, will give customers further peace of mind that they will be compensated if something goes wrong when they switch. They should also serve as a wake-up call for suppliers to cut out problems for customers and get switching right first time. From 1 May 2020, customers whose switch does not complete within 15 working days, or who are switched by a supplier by mistake, will receive the payment from the new supplier. The supplier the customer is switching away from must pay out if it fails to issue a final bill within six weeks of a switch. Ofgem introduced the first batch of compensation payments last year2, meaning suppliers must pay out if they fail to meet minimum standards around spotting and correcting mistaken switches, or refunding credit balances to customers. Since then, customers have already received over £700,000 from suppliers. Of these payments, 27% have been for mistaken switches, while 73% have been for late credit balance refunds. Mary Starks, executive director for Consumers and Markets at Ofgem, said: “More customers are switching than ever, with a record 6.4 million changing supplier in 2019. But we also know that a minority can still experience problems when they switch. “As part of our commitment to protecting consumers and enabling competition, we are introducing these new standards to give customers further peace of mind, and to challenge suppliers to get it right first time. “Going forward, we will continue working with suppliers and consumer groups to deliver our programme for faster and more reliable switching and ensure these arrangements are fit for the future”. Minister for Energy and Clean Growth Kwasi Kwarteng said: “We’ve made it easier than ever for consumers to shop around and record numbers are now switching suppliers to save on their bills. “These tough new standards will ensure switching is as smooth as possible and consumers are always protected.” Notes 1 – In September 2019, Ofgem consulted on these new compensation payments (known as Guaranteed Standards), and published the final decision on 12 February 2020. The new standards will take effect from 01 May 2020. 2 – These new Guaranteed Standards are part of Ofgem’s programme of work to deliver faster and more reliable switching. In 2019 Ofgem introduced the first tranche of Guaranteed Standards, requiring suppliers to pay compensation if they fail to meet minimum standards regarding how promptly credit balances are refunded to customers, as well as forcing suppliers to pay compensation if they were too slow in identifying, rectifying, and notifying customers of “erroneous transfers” (when people are switched by mistake). Both the gaining supplier and the losing supplier must pay compensation if they fail to agree that an erroneous transfer has occurred (within 20 working days), if the contacted supplier fails to provide notification to this customer of this decision (within 20 working days), and to the customer’s original supplier if they fail to re-register the customer promptly (within 21 working days). This first tranche of Guaranteed Standards took effect on 1 May 2019. The new Guaranteed Standards introduced in May this year in the second tranche will require the gaining supplier to make a compensation payment if a customer is erroneously switched to them. This Guaranteed Standard was held over from the previous tranche in order for us to identify which supplier was most likely to be responsible for an erroneous switch. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information OfGem information What happens during transfer to another energy supplier? What happens during transfer to another energy supplier? What happens during transfer to another energy supplier? business electricity business gas
What if my business has bad credit history? Energy suppliers take credit issues very seriously with their customers. There are number of solutions that Energy4 can look at and see what Energy4 can do to help you move to another supplier. We all know we’re supposed to pay our bills on time and carry as little debt as possible—the two major factors that go into calculating our credit scores. Yet, there are other, smaller factors many people aren’t aware of that can also have an impact on our scores. KEY TAKEAWAYS Failing to pay even small bills could lower your credit score. Too many recent applications for credit could also be a negative. If you have a business credit card and are the primary account holder, it can also show up on your personal credit report. 1. Small Unpaid Debts Many people pay their mortgage, credit card, and utility bills with unflappable consistency, yet neglect smaller debts. They may feel these debts are less important or that they will just go away if ignored. But sometimes they won’t. Municipalities were once known to report unpaid parking tickets and even library fines to credit bureaus, for example, although that practice has largely been curtailed. Still, other unpaid debts, however trivial they may seem, can weigh down your credit score. 2. Utility Bills Your electricity or gas bill is not a loan, but failing to pay it can hurt your credit score. While utility companies won’t normally report a customer’s payment history, they will report delinquent accounts much more quickly than other companies you may do business with. 3. Too Many Recent Credit Applications It can be tempting to sign up for new credit cards that offer an attractive bonus for your business. Banks may offer tens of thousands of points or airline miles, while retailers provide in-store discounts when you apply for their credit card. A single application may have little effect, but too many in a short time period can lower your credit score. So limit your number of applications for credit, especially if you are getting ready to shop for a home, car, or student loan, where a strong credit score could be extra important. 4. Long-Term Loan Shopping To allow consumers to shop around for the best rates on automobile, student, and home loans, FICO will not penalize people who have multiple credit inquiries in a short period of time. Various FICO formulas discount multiple inquiries within either 14 or 45 days.1 However, continuing to shop around for a loan over several months will fall outside of this safe harbour and likely lower your score. 5. Business Credit Cards Do you have a credit card for your business? If you are the primary account holder on the card, most banks will hold you personally responsible for any debts you rack up with it, as well as reporting your payment history to the credit bureaus. Late payments or unpaid debts will affect your personal credit, so be sure to use any business cards as judiciously as your personal ones. 6. Mistakes You Didn’t Make Incorrect information in your credit history can hurt your score. People with common names, for example, frequently find other people’s information in their file. In other cases, typos and clerical errors result in adverse information affecting your score. This is one of the reasons consumers are encouraged to check their credit reports at least annually and dispute any mistakes they find. You can obtain free credit reports once a year from each of the three major credit bureaus through the official website, AnnualCreditReport.com. One of the best credit monitoring services could also be useful in this endeavour. Review your credit reports at least once a year to check for errors or missing accounts you’d like to see listed. 7. Missing Accounts Sometimes the problem isn’t what’s in your credit report but what’s not in it. Some of your creditors may not supply information to the credit bureaus. That could mean a lower credit score if, for example, a credit card you have a pristine record of paying off on time isn’t included in your report, while another, where you’ve missed a payment or two, is. If you find any such accounts have been left off your report, FICO suggests you either “ask your creditors to begin reporting your credit information to credit bureaus” or “consider moving your account to a different creditor who does report regularly.”2 If any of these factors are weighing down your credit score, one of the best credit repair companies might be able to remove these negative marks on your credit reports on your behalf. Bad credit energy suppliers, energy providers with no credit check Most energy companies carry out credit checks to ensure you’ll be able to pay your bills regularly and on time. You see, the majority of utility providers let you pay for your gas and electricity via direct debit or by bill receipt – which means you only pay for what you use. To that end, providers run credit checks to ensure you’re in a position to pay for your utilities before accepting you as a customer. But don’t worry – utility credit checks aren’t as stringent as those on credit cards or loans. Chances are that rather than being turned down altogether, you may be offered a tariff the provider deems more suitable for you. Why do energy companies perform credit checks? The more people skip payments or fail to pay their bills on time, the higher the chance is that gas and electricity prices will increase over the long term. This is because ultimately the provider has to pick up the cost of those missed payments. Credit checks are used to mitigate this risk. Gas companies with no credit check Nearly all the big six energy companies – British Gas, E.ON, Scottish Power, npower and Southern Energy – perform credit checks before you can sign up to a deal. The only exception is EDF Energy. At the time of writing, it doesn’t carry out a credit check on new customers wanting to take out a post-pay tariff. That said, you should still try and improve your credit rating, if you can. You’ll have more deals to choose from and you’ll likely end up saving more over time. Electricity companies with no credit check Unfortunately, it’s difficult to find an electricity company that doesn’t run credit checks. At the time of writing, EDF is the only major provider that will not require you to pass a credit check. As we say, though, try not to let this be your deciding factor. It’s always better to at least try and improve your credit score rather than going for a provider on the basis that it doesn’t run credit checks. Do energy suppliers do credit checks? Yes, the majority of suppliers perform credit checks on potential customers. The good news is that these type of credit checks aren’t as rigorous as the tests for loans or credit cards. Indeed, if you fail a credit check for one tariff, your chosen provider will most likely suggest one it thinks is more suitable for you. No credit check energy providers Nearly all the big six energy suppliers request that you pass a credit check so they can be confident that you’ll pay your bills consistently and on time. To check your credit score, sign up to a free credit checker online. This way, you’ll be able to keep tabs on your credit score, identify what might be affecting it, and find ways to improve your rating over time. Can I get an energy deal without passing a credit check? The easiest way to avoid a credit check is to opt for a prepayment meter – also known as a pay-as-you-go meter. They’re installed in your home and let you simply top-up each time you need gas or electricity. With these meters you pay for the electricity before you use it, so there’s no credit check to pass. Good thing is, you won’t be taken off guard – you’ll know exactly how much gas and electricity is available to you, and when it’s likely to run out. And because there’s no contract, you can choose to sign up for different energy tariffs whenever you want. Downside is that prepayment meters are usually more expensive per unit of energy than other tariffs. If you want to get a good deal, we recommend fixing your credit history, first so you can shop around. FAQs How can I improve my credit history to get an energy deal? There are a number of ways you to improve your credit rating, including: Paying outgoings on time, especially energy bills. Register your address on the electoral roll. Ensure you have a proper bank account and all of the information is correct and up to date. Don’t link your finances to people with bad credit – joint accounts, utility bills, etc. – if you can help it. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Information 1 Information 2 What if my business has bad credit history? What if my business has bad credit history? What if my business has bad credit history? What if my business has bad credit history? What if my business has bad credit history? What if my business has bad credit history? business electricity business gas

What is a 100kW half hourly supply?

Half hourly meters are for those companies that are energy intensive and their average peak for electricity demand is higher than 100kWh over a three month period for the year previous.

Two simple ways to check of you are a half hour customer:

– Half hourly meters have a communications link to the energy supplier which can be read remotely on a daily basis and the information is then sent back to them

– Check your energy bill, if you are on a half hourly meter you will see that your bill begins with double zero “00”

Our specialised team can arrange for the cheapest prices from suppliers especially those that cater for the half-hourly meter market

What is a 100kW half hourly supply & How half-hourly settlement will help cut energy bills

What do a smart meter, an electric car and an in-home battery have in common? They’re all new technologies where we’re working to help people get the most from their electricity usage.

This work involves reforming electricity ‘settlement’ – the process for charging suppliers for the difference between how much energy they purchase, and how much their customers actually use. We’re reforming these arrangements across the country while industry is installing smart meters, and more and more people invest in smart home technology.

But why is it important, and what will our work achieve? Ofgem’s Head of Settlement Reform Anna Stacey takes a look at some of our behind-the-scenes activity.

What is settlement?
Currently, suppliers estimate customers’ electricity use based on the average customer’s consumption patterns. There may be discrepancies between this and how much wholesale electricity a supplier has bought. Settlement reconciles these.

With smart meters that can record electricity consumption information every half hour of the day and transmit it, industry can use this information for settlement instead. This means that suppliers will have a much more accurate picture of consumption and demand, and can match their purchases accordingly.

Why is half-hourly settlement so important?
Half-hourly settlement is a major part of the smart, flexible energy system. It can help make the future low-carbon system that we are working towards both affordable and secure. It will help integrate smart technology into the electricity system to help us use the network and the electricity it generates more effectively. It also means that suppliers can bill customers accurately, and base these more closely on the cost of generating and supplying the electricity they use.

Technology such as energy storage allows households and businesses to shift their energy use, and change their demand for electricity in response to price or other factors. This is part of demand-side response:

For example, a battery can recharge when electricity is cheap and plentiful, and then give out the energy when electricity is more expensive. Being able to flex supply and demand will become increasingly important to avoid wasting low carbon generation and to keep the system stable.

For households and businesses, half-hourly data means knowing how much electricity they are using. They can choose to use more or less in response to this information if they wish. This may suit them if they want to avoid times of the day when electricity is expensive to generate, when generation is relying on fossil fuels, when many other households or businesses want to use electricity and they do not, or when networks are strained.

For the electricity system as a whole, half-hourly settlement will help suppliers, network operators and generators understand when and where energy is being used. They can then target when and where to invest in the energy network, and avoid building expensive extra power stations and putting up more poles and wires than are needed.

What changes are taking place now?
From 1 April 2017, all medium and large businesses must be settled on their half-hourly electricity use. This is known in the industry as the code modification P272. Businesses will have detailed usage information and can use this to shop around for a supplier who offers them value for money based on their specific needs.

Suppliers have now changed the meters in businesses and can start to offer time-of-use ‘smart’ tariffs that meet businesses’ needs, rewarding them for moving their electricity consumption away from peak periods.

From July 2017, suppliers who want to are able to settle their small business and domestic consumers using their half-hourly data too, following changes to make this easier. This, alongside smart meter rollout, means that households may soon be able to choose a smart tariff contract. The smart meters allow them to see when they are using electricity, and the smart tariffs will allow them to control their bills.

What are smart tariffs?
Smart tariffs are price signals to consumers. Lower prices reflect the lower cost of generating and transmitting electricity at certain times of the day and year. These prices reflect both the cost of generating and transporting electricity. It is cheap when there is lots of wind and solar energy available, and expensive when diesel-powered generators are used. These prices also include the longer-term costs of building and maintaining electricity networks and power plants. Based on their lifestyle and circumstances, consumers who choose smart tariffs will save money when they consume less during peak periods.

What happens next?
We have launched an industry code review, which will allow us to work with industry and consumer groups over the next couple of years to weigh up whether to require all consumers with smart meters in Great Britain be settled using their half-hourly data.

We will carefully analyse the technicalities of changing the current system and complete a thorough cost-benefit analysis to inform the case for bringing in half-hourly settlement for everyone. We will monitor the impacts of P272 for businesses, and for those suppliers and consumers who choose half-hourly settlement now. In summary we are investigating what we need to do to make sure consumers and the system benefit from making settlement smart.

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Information from OfGem

business electricity business gas

What is a 100kW half hourly supply?

Understanding your rollover business energy contract
  • A rollover energy contract is all too easy to fall into and can often lead to higher rates and bigger utility costs for your business.
  • A rollover contract is signed at the beginning of your business energy contract and should be read carefully before signing. It details what happens if you don’t renew your contract in the renewal period. A rollover contract gives you information on how to notify for cancellation or non-renewal.
However, rollover contracts are easy to avoid and you have legal rights which are on your side to help you. When your energy contract is due to finish, you need to cancel it within the set time period otherwise your energy supplier are within their rights to automatically sign you up to a new contract and new – usually higher – rates. This is what is called a ‘rollover’ energy contract. The new contract you end up with will not be good value for money or a competitive tariff, and you’ll be stuck with it for at least one year. How can you avoid being rolled over? rollover energy contract If your supplier continues to operate a rollover energy contract and your business is a macro business, you can avoid being automatically rolled over by providing termination notice to them in line with their policies. Regardless of when you terminate (as long as you do), Energy4 can secure you a new contract anything up to 6 months before your contract end date. You won’t be able to start this contract before your current one finishes but you will be able to lock in your prices at the earliest opportunity so that when you see a good deal, you can act to secure it. If, for whatever reason, you terminate your contract with your current supplier but do not agree a new contract with them or another supplier before your end date then you will have to pay out-of-contract rates. These are very punitive rates designed to force you to agree a lower priced, but still premium priced fixed term contract with the supplier. I have been put on a rollover energy contract – What do I do? If you have been rolled over, sadly, it’s Could your energy costs be cheaper with SSE? too late in most circumstances. There is little you can do. This is why a rollover energy contract can be so frustrating to businesses who have found themselves on higher rates who have missed the opportunity to terminate or negotiate. Even if your supplier won’t release you from your contract, Energy4 will work with your supplier to negotiate backdates for customers caught by rollover terms. However – not all suppliers offer this and not all customers are eligible. If the worst happens and you are rolled over, and you are certain that you didn’t receive a renewal letter before your contract was due to end, then you have grounds to argue the case with you energy supplier. For most rollovers you will be locked in for the full 12 months and it becomes important to make steps to ensure that this doesn’t happen again. Immediately terminate your contract as soon as you become aware you have been rolled over and contract Energy4 with your new contract end date. We can then line up a deal for you well in advance of the next deadline and make sure you don’t rollover again. If further help is needed, the Citizens Advice consumer helpline can offer advice if you’re having trouble paying your energy bills or if you’re not happy with the payment plan options your supplier is offering you. So what are the rules given to suppliers regarding rollover energy contracts? Rollover might seem unfair, but it isn’t against the law and it doesn’t break any rules. There are however some laws around how rollovers should be handled that provide you with some protection if your business is a micro business: – Around 60 days (but no longer than 120 days) before your contract is due to end, your energy supplier must send you a letter telling you the details of your renewal offer and the contract will be rolled on to if you fail to act on your renewal. – You can’t be rolled over to a new contract that lasts longer than 12 months. – Once you’ve received your renewal, you will then have a defined period in which you need to tell your energy supplier that you don’t want to accept the tariff you were offered. This period is specific to each supplier, visit our dedicated supplier pages to understand the notice period your supplier needs to prevent you being rolled over. You can also identify which suppliers operate a rollover policy and which do not in our dedicated supplier pages. Want to see how we have helped our customers to save? Check out our business energy case studies pages to find out how our service have benefited other businesses in your sector. The letter below contains our decision to modify the gas and electricity supply licences by amending standard licence condition (SLC) 1 and SLC 7A. It explains how our decision takes into account the responses to the statutory consultation published on 30 July 2014. These modifications will require suppliers to:
  • allow micro-business consumers to give notice to terminate a contract no more than 30 days before a contract ends,
  • provide current prices and annual consumption details on renewal letters for micro-business fixed-term contracts, and
  • acknowledge a termination notice from a micro-business consumer within five working days of receipt, or as soon as reasonably practical after that.
All the changes will take effect on 30 April 2015. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information business electricity business gas
There is nothing Smart about this meter, the term was taken from Smart Grid, an idea for a system to be integrated into every consumer unit and switch gear across the UK, deactivating unrequired usage during power-grid failures, etc., From articles written by poverty Charites, and the Rowntree’s foundation, this is just another attempt to cut of those in abject poverty who do not have the finances to pay. It is simply a ‘Poverty’ meter, to get around the old welfare laws that can protect the sick, homeless, destitute, and those in poverty in line with the Department of Work and Pensions.

Smart meters use wireless signals to communicate with your supplier, which means you don’t have to ring in meter readings or use the internet

“…Officials claim they will help you to save money, as you’ll be more aware of how much energy different appliances use — and reduce your consumption…”

No evidence to cooperate this based on Energy4 helping clients using old meters vs New Smart Meters. From reviewing the smart meter history it is found that no utility company actually owns the Meters, they were created through 4 projects involving regional development funding from HM Treasury. The reason for the requirement of Smart Meters is too use up the supply made. Confidence of the Smart Meters is presently lacking due to incidents of OfGem  demanding utility companies, and the Press not publish information on failed meters.

“…These digital meters will also ensure you are only billed for the power you’ve used, putting an end to estimated bills. Most big energy companies are writing to customers to offer them one of the new smart meters. However, some are only offering them in certain areas of the country and many smaller firms are not yet fitting them, so you may have to wait. As many as one in three households is also being told they can’t have a meter because it won’t work in their property — for example, if the walls are too thick, or they live in a rural area with poor mobile phone signal…”

No evidence to cooperate this based on Energy4 helping clients using old meters vs New Smart Meters. New property developments require thicker insulated walls to improve commercial properties EPC rating to C, B, and eventually A. Therefore this makes Smart Meters redundant. Smart Meter was coined from Smart Consumer Unit to help shutdown electricity requirements during power shortages. This idea created in the 1980s was never followed through as it would give a requirement that only the Hot water, and Refrigeration of each property would be permitted, to do this separate ring-mains around a property would be required. The Government has failed to upgrade the Electrical installation regulations to make this possible. Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information business electricity business gas
Your MPAN is the unique identifying number of the Electricity meter at your property. Meter Point Administration Number, also known as MPAN, Supply Number or S-Number, is a 21-digit reference. Energy network operators can tell you who your electricity supplier is. They can also give you your electricity Meter Point Administration Number (MPAN). This tells your energy supplier where your meter is and your electricity supply number. A Meter Point Administration Number, also known as MPANSupply Number or S-Number, is a 21-digit reference used in Great Britain to uniquely identify electricity supply points such as individual domestic residences. The gas equivalent is the Meter Point Reference Number and the water/wastewater equivalent for non-household customers is the Supply Point ID. The system was introduced in 1998 in order to provide a competitive environment for the electricity companies, and allows consumers to switch their supplier easily as well as simplifying administration. Although the name suggests that an MPAN refers to a particular meter, an MPAN can have several meters associated with it,[1] or indeed none where it is an unmetered supply. A supply receiving power from the network operator (DNO) has an Import MPAN, while generation and microgeneration projects feeding back into the DNO network are given Export MPANs. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information business electricity business gas
Your MPRN (Meter Point Reference Number) is the unique identifying number of the Gas meter at your property.  It is usually a 6 to 10 digit number, sometimes referred to as an “M” number.  It can be found on your gas bill (generally on the back of the bill). Talk to the Meter Point Administration Service for your MPRN (Meter Point Reference Number) You can:  Use their online Find My Supplier search tool Call them on 0870 608 1524. They can also give you your Meter Point Reference Number (MPRN). This tells your energy supplier where your meter is and your gas supply number. A Meter Point Administration Number, also known as MPANSupply Number or S-Number, is a 21-digit reference used in Great Britain to uniquely identify electricity supply points such as individual domestic residences. The gas equivalent is the Meter Point Reference Number and the water/wastewater equivalent for non-household customers is the Supply Point ID. The system was introduced in 1998 in order to provide a competitive environment for the electricity companies, and allows consumers to switch their supplier easily as well as simplifying administration. Although the name suggests that an MPAN refers to a particular meter, an MPAN can have several meters associated with it,[1] or indeed none where it is an unmetered supply. A supply receiving power from the network operator (DNO) has an Import MPAN, while generation and microgeneration projects feeding back into the DNO network are given Export MPANs Can I change my energy provider Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information business electricity business gas What is an MPRN?

What is FIT? – Feed-In Tariffs were introduced on 1 April 2010 and replaced UK government grants as the main financial incentive to encourage uptake of renewable electricity-generating technologies. Most domestic technologies qualify for the scheme, including:

The Feed-in Tariffs (FIT) scheme is a government programme designed to promote the uptake of renewable and low-carbon electricity generation technologies.

Introduced on 1 April 2010, the scheme requires participating licensed electricity suppliers to make payments on both generation and export from eligible installations.

Closure of the Feed-In Tariffsscheme
Please be aware that the Feed-In Tariffs scheme closed to new applicants from 1 April 2019, barring some exceptions. We have published an FAQ and guidance document which help explain the impact of these changes.

Who’s the scheme for?
The Feed-In Tariffs scheme is available for anyone who has installed, or is looking to install, one of the following technology types up to a capacity of 5MW, or 2kW for CHP:

Solar photovoltaic (solar PV)
Wind
Micro combined heat and power (CHP)
Hydro
Anaerobic digestion (AD)
How does the scheme work?
Feed-In Tariffs payments are made quarterly (at least) for the electricity your installation has generated and exported. Payments are made based on the meter reading you submit to your energy supplier (we call them your Feed-In Tariffs licensee).

Feed-In Tariffs payments are made by your energy supplier from the date you become eligible for the scheme.

The number of new installations that can receive support under the Feed-In Tariffs scheme each month is capped – we call these deployment caps. Applications queue for entry into the Feed-In Tariffs scheme:

For small installations, by the date and time the installation’s MCS certificate was issued.
For large installations, by the date and time the application was received by Ofgem.

There are a number of key players on the Feed-In Tariffs scheme.

Generators
Generators are the owners of installations who apply to the Feed-In Tariffsscheme.

Licensees
Feed-In Tariffs Licensees are energy suppliers who process applications submitted for small installations and make Feed-In Tariffs payments to all installations.

Under Ofgem’s safety net, the energy supply of customers of a licensee which has had its licence revoked continues as normal. The process is different for Feed-in Tariff (FIT) customers whose payments were made by the licensee whose licence has been revoked.

Our guidance gives direction on what happens in this situation for Feed-In Tariffs generators. Feed-In Tariffs generators have a responsibility to select a new Feed-In Tariffs Licensee and agree Feed-In Tariffs terms with them in order to continue receiving Feed-In Tariffs payments. When a Feed-In Tariffs generator approaches a new licensee, they will be required to provide all the information they have regarding their installation. This will include name, address, Feed-In Tariffs ID, whether the installation is MCS or ROO-FIT, the MCS or ROO-FIT number, technology type and capacity as well as billing information and the date of the meter reading when the last Feed-In Tariffs payments were made.

We are responsible for administering some aspects of the Feed-In Tariffs scheme:

Running the Central Feed-In Tariffs Register – the database of all accredited installations.
Monitoring deployment caps and publishing reports.
Processing applications for large installations.
Processing applications from community and school applicants.
Ensuring suppliers comply with the Feed-In Tariffs scheme requirements.
The Feed-In Tariffs scheme policy and tariff rates are set by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

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Further information

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kVA stands for kilo volt-ampere, this is used to refer to the measure of power in a transformer. It is as a result of the product of voltage and power. The kilo Volt Amps is mainly used for the purpose of showing the output capacity in a generator.

It stands for Kilo Volt Amperes and one KVA equals 1,000 Watts of power. Many businesses misjudge the kVA capacity they require by trying to link their maximum power requirement (kVA) to their total annual energy usage (kWh)

Generator Rating

The capacity of a synchronous generator is equal to the product of the voltage per phase, the current per phase, and the number of phases. It is normally stated in megavolt-amperes (MVA) for large generators or kilovolt-amperes (kVA) for small generators. Both the voltage and the current are the effective, or rms, values (equal to the peak value divided by Square root of√2).

The voltage rating of the generator is normally stated as the operating voltage between two of its three terminals—i.e., the phase-to-phase voltage. For a winding connected in delta, this is equal to the phase-winding voltage. For a winding connected in wye, it is equal to Square root of√3 times the phase-winding voltage.

The capacity rating of the machine differs from its shaft power because of two factors—namely, the power factor and the efficiency. The power factor is the ratio of the real power delivered to the electrical load divided by the total voltage–current product for all phases. The efficiency is the ratio of the electrical power output to the mechanical power input. The difference between these two power values is the power loss consisting of losses in the magnetic iron due to the changing flux, losses in the resistance of the stator and rotor conductors, and losses from the windage and bearing friction. In large synchronous generators, these losses are generally less than 5 percent of the capacity rating. These losses must be removed from the generator by a cooling system to maintain the temperature within the limit imposed by the insulation of the windings.

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Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

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What is kVA What is kVA What is kVA What is kVA What is kVA What is kVA What is kVA

The RO came into effect in 2002 in England and Wales, and Scotland, followed by Northern Ireland in 2005. It places an obligation on UK electricity suppliers to source an increasing proportion of the electricity they supply from renewable sources.

About The RO
The Renewables Obligation (RO) is one of the main support mechanisms for large-scale renewable electricity projects in the UK. Smaller scale generation is mainly supported through the Feed-In Tariffs (FIT scheme).

The RO came into effect in 2002 in England and Wales, and Scotland, followed by Northern Ireland in 2005. It places an obligation on UK electricity suppliers to source an increasing proportion of the electricity they supply from renewable sources.

The RO closed to all new generating capacity on 31 March 2017. There are also a number of early closures which are in force for specific technologies. Generators who are eligible to apply for a grace period can gain entry to the RO after these closures for a specified amount of time. More information on the 2017 closure and early closures is on the RO closure page.

Renewables Obligation Certificates (ROCs)
ROCs are certificates issued to operators of accredited renewable generating stations for the eligible renewable electricity they generate. Operators can trade ROCs with other parties. ROCs are ultimately used by suppliers to demonstrate that they have met their obligation.

Where suppliers do not present a sufficient number of ROCs to meet their obligation in the reporting period (one year), they must pay an equivalent amount into a buy-out fund. The administration cost of the scheme is recovered from the fund and the rest is distributed back to suppliers in proportion to the number of ROCs they produced in meeting their individual obligation. For more information on ROCs, see Applying for the RO.

Annual obligation levels
For information on how the obligation level is set each year, please visit the DECC website.

Ofgem’s role
The RO scheme policy is set by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and, in Northern Ireland, the Department for the Economy (DfE), but the scheme is administered by Ofgem.

We assess and, where appropriate, accredit RO applications that have been made to us. Assessments are made based on the evidence submitted with the application and the circumstances specific to the generating station.

Applicants must meet the eligibility criteria to be granted accreditation under the RO. It is not our role to interpret legislation on your behalf; we encourage you to seek legal and technical advice to help understand how the legislation applies to you.

We are unable to comment on future policy amendments or on speculative applications and scenarios.

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Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

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OfGem information

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What is the 28 day contract? New business owners, or business owners who have missed there contract renewal, or have not done a comparison of energy prices since market deregulation in the 1990’s often find themselves locked in to a 28 day supply contract. The prices for energy in these contracts often fluctuate up and down with the market situation and are rarely competitive. Energy4 recommends that businesses switch to fixed term, or fixed rate contracts and have them for a minimum of one year sometimes with the same supplier fortunately as the name 28 day suggests a switch can happen anytime by giving 28 days notification of intention to switch which is good news for you Fixed means fixed – consumers on fixed deals now get price certainty Automatic roll-overs now banned for householders on fixed deals Energy suppliers are now subject to Ofgem’s reforms and the next step will see simpler tariffs coming into force at the end of December From today new Ofgem rules come into force meaning energy suppliers are banned from increasing prices on fixed term tariffs.1 They are also banned from automatically rolling householders on to another fixed term offer when their current one ends. These new rules are the latest stage of Ofgem’s reforms to reset the energy market so that it is simpler, clearer and fairer for consumers. They are in addition to reforms, introduced in August that require suppliers to treat consumers fairly, and are part of Ofgem’s work to make a positive difference for consumers. Ofgem’s review found that with many fixed-term deals suppliers could still increase prices where they were index linked, for example, to standard tariff prices. This would tie consumers into a tariff they could not get out of even if prices went up. Ofgem also found that consumers were being automatically rolled onto new fixed term offers which could include termination fees, meaning they missed out on chances to compare the market. Ofgem is giving consumers more protection so they have the certainty that if they choose a fixed term deal, the price and conditions they sign-up to will not be altered. Consumers will not be rolled-over to a new fixed-term deal, but to a tariff which allows them to switch away without penalty. They will also get over 40 days warning that their fixed deal is coming to an end so they have plenty of opportunity to find the best deal for them. Andrew Wright, Ofgem’s Chief Executive, said: “Ofgem is resetting the energy market in consumers’ favour to make it simpler, clear and fairer. Today’s extra protection for consumers on fixed prices is just one of a range of reforms we are bringing in over the next six months to hold energy companies to higher standards. If suppliers fail to deliver, then Ofgem stands ready to take enforcement action to protect consumers. “In an era of rising prices it is vital that competition works as effectively as possible. Our reforms seek to give consumers the tools they need to find the best energy deal for them and to ensure that suppliers have to treat them fairly. Ofgem is going to make it easier for consumers to “vote with their feet” and for new suppliers to enter the market and take on the Big Six. Now we are looking for energy suppliers to pick up the baton and put their efforts into restoring consumer trust. Encouragingly suppliers have shown a willingness to start on this journey by signing up to our reforms and are now acting to implement them.” Summary of today’s reforms1. Fixed term contracts Suppliers will be banned from increasing prices, or making other changes to fixed term contracts which are to the disadvantage of a customer. The only exceptions to this are “tracker” tariffs that follow an independent index over which the supplier has no control, or structured price increases set out in advance which are fully in line with consumer protection law. This new rule applies to any contracts entered into on or after July 15 2013. Suppliers will be required to notify customers that their current fixed-term is coming to an end between 42 and 49 days before the contract ends. Between this notification period and the end of the fixed term contract, suppliers will be banned from charging a termination fee should the customer decide to switch. Suppliers will be banned from automatically rolling a customer over onto a further fixed term contract. Instead suppliers will be required to default customers to an evergreen contract if the customer takes no switching action before the end of their fixed-term contract (this default contract must be the cheapest evergreen tariff with the supplier from 31st March 2014). 2. All contracts If customers are told about a price rise and choose to switch then existing rules mean that the supplier cannot apply the higher price. We have made it simpler for customers to benefit from this “price protection window” as they will no longer have to notify their old supplier to benefit and keep their current prices until their new contract begins. Timeline Fairer treatment – introduced August 2013 Since August new Standards of Conduct require suppliers and any organisation that represents them, such as brokers or third party intermediaries, to ensure that each domestic customer is treated fairly. These cover three broad areas. Behaviour: suppliers must behave and carry out any actions in a fair, honest, transparent, appropriate and professional manner. Information: suppliers must provide information, (whether in writing or orally) which is: Process: the supplier must: Complete, accurate and not misleading (in terms of the information provided or omitted); Communicated in plain and intelligible language; Relates to products or services that are appropriate to the customer to whom it is directed; and Fair both in terms of its content and in terms of how it is presented (with more important information being given appropriate prominence. Make it easy for the consumer to contact them; Act promptly and courteously to put things right when they make a mistake; and Ensure that customer service arrangements and processes are complete, thorough, fit for purpose and transparent. Simpler tariffs – to be introduced by the end of December 2013 Suppliers will be limited to offering up to four “core” tariffs per fuel (electricity and gas). This will apply to each payment type. Suppliers will be allowed to offer these tariffs to collective switching schemes. They will also be able to offer extra fixed term tariffs into schemes that meet our criteria. All tariffs will have a standing charge and a single unit rate. Suppliers can set the standing charge at zero if they wish and some are doing this. This means that complex two tier tariffs will no longer be allowed. Dual fuel and online account management discounts will remain. They will not be considered as “core tariffs” but as a discount. They will be simplified and will apply uniformly across all tariffs as £/pence per year. For example, a supplier would be able to offer a direct debit, standard meter, customer a choice of no more than four electricity and four gas tariffs. The customer could then choose a dual fuel discount and an online account management discount. Clearer information – to be introduced by the end of March 2014 New rules will be in place requiring all information suppliers send to consumers to be simplified, more engaging and personalised to them. Suppliers will be required to give all their customers personalised information on the cheapest tariff they offer for them. This information will appear on each bill and on a range of other customer communications. Suppliers will be required to give a comparison of old and new prices in a simple pounds and pence form when they inform customers of a price increase, to provide consumers with a clearer indication of the impact of a change in prices. Suppliers will use a new Tariff Comparison Rate (TCR), in bills and a range of other communications to provide “at a glance” information to help customers compare tariffs. The TCR will be similar to the APR comparison rate used with credit cards. Ofgem is also requiring suppliers to provide personalised cost projections for the next 12 months based on the customer’s actual consumption (or, where this is unavailable, the best estimate of their consumption), which will also be included on bills and a range of other communications. This will enable consumers to compare tariffs more accurately when assessing their options. A new tariff information label will set out key terms and conditions as well as relevant information to help consumers compare across suppliers. 3. Dead tariffs All customers on existing, expensive “dead tariffs” (evergreen tariffs that are no longer marketed) must be transferred onto the cheapest variable rate by June 2014. A supplier will only be able to keep consumers on “dead tariffs” if they are cheaper than, or as cheap as, the supplier’s lowest standard or evergreen tariff. 4. Ofgem Ofgem is the Office of the Gas and Electricity Markets, which supports the Gas and Electricity Markets Authority, the regulator of the gas and electricity industries in Great Britain. The Authority’s functions are set out mainly in the Gas Act 1986, the Electricity Act 1989, the Competition Act 1998 and the Utilities Act 2000. In this note, the functions of the Authority under all the relevant Acts are, for simplicity, described as the functions of Ofgem. What is the 28 day contract? What is the 28 day contract? What is the 28 day contract? What is the 28 day contract? Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Information from OfGem business electricity business gas
What is the deemed rates contract? A deemed rates contract or out-of-contract normally applies if you move into new business premises and don’t agree a contract. You could also be on a deemed or out-of-contract contract if your current contract ends but the supplier continues supplying energy that you use. This might happen if the original contract does not state what will happen at the end of a contract or does not have renewal provisions. Deemed and out-of-contact contracts are usually among a supplier’s most expensive. It’s best to shop around and agree on a contract as soon as you take on premises or near an end-date to avoid paying more. Deemed or also known as out of contract rates are considered the worst in the industry, often they apply to businesses that are new or that have terminated a contract and have not switched a supplier. However, like the 28 day contract, you also have 28 days notice period is required to switch to the cheapest electricity prices. At the moment the prices around about 45 pence/day Standing charge and 26.5 p/kWh Day Rate depending on the type of meter you have in the property Types of contract How you use gas and electricity as a business will differ from the average household. So business energy contracts are different, with offers varying between business energy suppliers. It’s important to understand your type of contract so you can check you are getting the best deal for your business usage. If you are a microbusiness, certain rules apply which affect how you are billed too. Fixed You’re charged a set rate per unit of energy (measured in kWh) for the fixed term of the contract. This doesn’t fix your total bill, which will go up or down with your energy usage. Variable Where the rate charged per unit of energy (measured in kWh) is linked to market activity. So your rate per unit of energy could change throughout your contract. Rollover This normally applies if you’ve not agreed a different contract before your current contract end date and there are no renewal provisions. If you are a microbusiness, this contract can’t last more than 12 months. How business energy contracts differ They are usually longer Business energy contracts often last up to five years or more in length with most one to three years. You’re usually tied into the contract until you enter a switching window in the contract. Normally this is near the contract end date. If you don’t give notice to your supplier about a planned switch in this period, you could roll over to an expensive default contract. It’s important to know your business contract end date and the notice periods required. There’s not normally a cooling-off period Household energy contracts offer 14 days to cancel from the date you agree a contract if you change your mind. Most business energy contracts don’t offer this, though it is worth asking about. You don’t need to sign an energy contract for it to be binding You could agree a contract on the phone. It’s best to ask for all terms to be sent in writing before you agree to an offer. They are usually single-fuel You’ll typically need to get separate quotes for gas and electricity contracts when shopping around, and will be billed separately for each too. Broker costs If you use a business energy broker the rate you pay could incorporate their fee, depending on your broker’s agreement with a supplier. It’s best to ask for all terms of a broker agreement and the energy contract offer to be sent in writing before you agree to it, so you are clear on the terms. Check your business energy rights Deemed energy contracts Read less If you are on a deemed energy contract, a supplier must not: stop you from switching to another supplier, for any reason or at any time. For example, they can’t object to you transferring for reasons of debt or contract. say you need to give notice before ending the deemed contract or charge you a termination fee. If you use energy on a deemed contract, your supplier must: take all reasonable steps to provide the principal terms of the deemed contract, including charges and fees provide you with a copy of the full contract if you ask for it take all reasonable steps to tell you about other available contracts and how you can get information about them take all reasonable steps to ensure that the terms of its deemed contract are not unduly onerous. Full details are outlined in the Supply Licence Conditions. Rollover energy contracts Read less A supplier can move you onto a rollover energy contract if you have not told them you plan to end a contract before the notice period runs out. If you are a microbusiness the rollover contract can’t last more than 12 months. Microbusiness energy contract notice periods and switching Read less For microbusiness customers, suppliers must: put the contract end date and notice period on all bills for fixed-term contracts. The maximum notice period to end a microbusiness energy contract is 30 days. allow you to tell them if you want to switch at the end of your contract at any time before the notice period. Qualifying as a microbusiness Read less Suppliers must take all reasonable steps to identify if you are a microbusiness. If they do not think you qualify, supply them with supporting evidence. This should include evidence that your business either: employs fewer than 10 employees (or full time equivalent) and has an annual turnover or balance sheet no greater than €2 million uses up to 100,000 kWh of electricity per year. uses up to 293,000 kWh of gas per year. If you aren’t satisfied with their response, check our guide to making a complaint. Half-hourly energy readings (‘P272’ and ‘P322’ codes) Read less Industry rules mean suppliers record business energy use every half hour, as part of a process called ‘settlement’. You’ll be moved onto these arrangements when you renew a business energy contract or switch supplier. You’re only affected if you’re a business customer in profile classes 5-8 and have an advanced meter. If you’re not sure, check with your supplier. Our guide Moving to half-hourly energy readings (BSC P272 and P322) explains how these rules might affect you. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information OfGem Information business electricity business gas What is the deemed rates contract?
What is VAT and Climate Change Levy? CCL will be shown separately on your bill, is subject to VAT and cannot be reclaimed from HMRC. The Climate Change Levy (CCL) was introduced in 2001 and is a government tax on businesses energy usage; this covers agriculture as well as the public sector.  The aim of the levy is to encourage commerce and industry as well as the public sector to reduce greenhouse emissions and improve one energy efficiency What is VAT and Climate Change Levy further explained? The Climate Change Levy (CCL) exemption schemes for renewables and combined heat and power (CHP) are closed. Levy exemption certificates (LECs), which were issued under these schemes, were only issued to electricity generated from CHP generators before 1 April 2013 and renewables generators before 1 August 2015. Transitional arrangements were in place until 1 April 2018 for a supplier to use these LECs to evidence the exemption. Ofgem was responsible for administering the CCL exemptions for renewables and CHP in Great Britain on behalf of HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) through a certification scheme. Under this scheme Ofgem issued LECs to eligible generators which were ultimately passed through to suppliers as the evidence needed to demonstrate to HMRC that electricity supplied to UK business customers is CCL exempt. It was then the final recipient of electricity supplied that could benefit from the tax exemption. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information OfGem information What is VAT and Climate Change Levy? business electricity business gas
What makes your services different from others?
  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 27 utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.
Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information What makes your services different from others? business gas business electricity

What rates can I expect to be available to me? Most of the energy suppliers require a minimum credit rating for your business therefore, with a good credit score you have the best chance of getting the best prices.

Some of the other variables that determine the eligibility for cheaper energy prices include:

Type of business are sole trader, limited company etc, what sector, such as manufacturing, retail etc.
Post code.
Direct debit payment terms are the best way to pay and this also shows the supplier you will pay on time.
Your meter profile is the first two digits on your meter reference number, the range is between 00 and 08, this classification is related to your consumption as small business has an average 03/04 profile.
Your annual consumption as SME is averages about 20,000 kWh annually.

Energy supplier confirms I am on the best tariff for my usage! how can I be sure

DO NOT take tariff information from only one supplier, It may the best tariff that your current supplier can offer, but not necessarily the best on the market to meet your needs

Never discuss your tariff with only one supplier. Energy4 on your behalf, can check ALL suppliers for the best deals

The truth is that many suppliers have provide incorrect information to customers, this can be found via Ofgem

Energy4 provides a quote, helpful, independent service to check your supplies, providing expert help you can trust

Am I on the best tariff with my supplier? You may be on a tariff with your supplier, however without evidence; you will not know this is the best tariff that your current supplier can offer. Suppliers will not quote other suppliers. Prices may not be necessarily the best on the market to meet your needs.

Why waste time checking with other suppliers when you can leave it all to Energy4? Our expert helps you can trust, with current energy market prices. The energy market is highly competitive, with prices and tariffs changing. Cheapest rates are constantly moving between energy suppliers, that includes the Big Six and others. It makes it difficult to say for sure which supplier is the most affordable.

Am I on the best tariff

Customers must allow Energy4 to prepare a compare energy supplier list. Allowing your tariff to slip from a fixed period contract to a variable one is one of the costliest moves to make in business. Be aware of when your current contract is coming to an end.

Energy4 helps business customers stay on top of the latest energy deals from all of our suppliers. Energy4 will provide lists, clearly identifying the cheapest energy supplier for you. Energy4 can offer energy savings alerts performing all the work, spending time searching for the best energy deals again.

Who is the best energy supplier depends on what’s important to you?

Is it the supplier who has the best ratings? Cheapest? Has the best ratings? Or is it the most environmentally friendly?

With all of these factors, we cannot say who the best energy supplier is. What we can do is present you with options to help you make the right choice for you. It’s important to understand that the energy market is constantly changing. New tariffs on the market, supplier ratings change, and greener energy sources are always in development. For this reason, it’s essential that you compare energy suppliers regularly.

Best Tariffs based on energy price cap

Energy price cap to increase in April but consumers should switch to save money

Big increase in wholesale energy prices push up price cap by £96 to £1,138 to pre-pandemic levels

The price cap continues to save consumers up to £100 a year and they can save up to £150 more by switching tariff

Support is available for those struggling to pay their energy bills, especially those in vulnerable circumstances

Ofgem has announced today that from 1 April 2021 the price cap will return to pre-pandemic levels, principally as a result of changes in wholesale energy prices.

When wholesale prices fell sharply last year in the wake of the first lockdown, the level of the price cap fell by £84 in October to its lowest level yet for the current winter period.

Demand for energy has since recovered which has pushed wholesale prices back up to more normal levels.

For six months from 1 April the price cap will increase by £96 to £1,138 for 11 million default tariff customers, and by £87 to £1,156 for 4 million pre-payment meter customers.

The price cap protects consumers who have not switched energy supplier by ensuring they pay a fair price for their electricity and gas.

Ofgem adjusts the level of the cap up or down twice a year to reflect the costs of supplying electricity and gas for suppliers.

Households on default tariffs are saving an estimated £75-£100 a year or £1 billion in total on their energy bills as a result.

Consumers who want to avoid the increase and save money should shop around ahead of the increase in the price cap on 1 April.

Jonathan Brearley, chief executive of Ofgem, said:

“Energy bill increases are never welcome, especially as many households are struggling with the impact of the pandemic. We have carefully scrutinised these changes to ensure that customers only pay a fair price for their energy.

“The price cap offers a safety net against poor pricing practices, saving customers up to £100 a year, but if they want to avoid the increase in April they should shop around for a cheaper deal.

“As the UK still faces challenges around COVID-19, during this exceptional time I expect suppliers to set their prices competitively, treat all customers fairly and ensure that any household in financial distress is given access to the support they need.

“The government and Ofgem have been working with the energy industry and consumer groups to support customers through this difficult time and I urge anyone worried about paying their energy bills to contact their supplier and access the help available.”

For the default tariff price cap level starting on 1 April, Ofgem has also allowed suppliers to claim £23 to cover higher levels of bad debt from more customers being unable to pay their energy bills due to the impact of COVID-19.

This will ensure suppliers can continue to supply energy and protect their customers, especially those in vulnerable circumstances.

Suppliers are required to provide emergency credit to customers struggling to top up their pre-payment meters, put those who are behind on their bills on affordable repayment plans and should not disconnect their customers.

Many have gone further in providing support over the last year, for example helping pre-payment meter customers who are shielding to top up.

Notes to editors

  1. Help available for consumers:

Ofgem rules require suppliers to offer emergency credit to pre-payment meter customers and put customers struggling to pay their energy bills on realistic and sustainable debt repayment plans based on their ability to pay.

If customers are struggling to pay for energy bills they should contact their energy supplier as soon as possible. Depending on their circumstances, customers may be eligible for extra help with their energy bills or services, such as payment breaks, suspending credit meter disconnections, and schemes like the Winter Fuel Payment or Warm Home Discount rebate.

The Citizens Advice consumer service can provide advice on how customers can resolve problems with their energy provider. For complex or urgent cases, or if a person is in a vulnerable situation they may then be referred onto the Extra Help Unit.

For help on how to switch to a better deal, see Ofgem’s guide.

Energy supplier confirms I am on the best tariff for my usage! how can I be sure

DO NOT take tariff information from only one supplier, It may the best tariff that your current supplier can offer, but not necessarily the best on the market to meet your needs

Never discuss your tariff with only one supplier. Energy4 on your behalf, can check ALL suppliers for the best deals

The truth is that many suppliers have provide incorrect information to customers, this can be found via Ofgem

Energy4 provides a quote, helpful, independent service to check your supplies, providing expert help you can trust

Am I on the best tariff with my supplier?
You may be on a tariff with your supplier, however without evidence; you will not know this is the best tariff that your current supplier can offer. Suppliers will not quote other suppliers. Prices may not be necessarily the best on the market to meet your needs

Why waste time checking with other suppliers when you can leave it all to Energy4?
Our expert helps you can trust, with current energy market prices. The energy market is highly competitive, with prices and tariffs changing. Cheapest rates are constantly moving between energy suppliers, that includes the Big Six and others. It makes it difficult to say for sure which supplier is the most affordable.

Am I on the best tariff
Customers must allow Energy4 to prepare a compare energy supplier list. Allowing your tariff to slip from a fixed period contract to a variable one is one of the costliest moves to make in business. Be aware of when your current contract is coming to an end.

Energy4 helps business customers stay on top of the latest energy deals from all of our suppliers. Energy4 will provide lists, clearly identifying the cheapest energy supplier for you. Energy4 can offer energy savings alerts performing all the work, spending time searching for the best energy deals again.

Who is the best energy supplier depends on what’s important to you?
Is it the supplier who has the best ratings? Cheapest? Has the best ratings? Or is it the most environmentally friendly?

With all of these factors, we cannot say who the best energy supplier is.
What we can do is present you with options to help you make the right choice for you. It’s important to understand that the energy market is constantly changing. New tariffs on the market, supplier ratings change, and greener energy sources are always in development. For this reason, it’s essential that you compare energy suppliers regularly.

Best Tariffs based on energy price cap
Energy price cap to increase in April but consumers should switch to save money

Big increase in wholesale energy prices push up price cap by £96 to £1,138 to pre-pandemic levels

The price cap continues to save consumers up to £100 a year and they can save up to £150 more by switching tariff

Support is available for those struggling to pay their energy bills, especially
those in vulnerable circumstances

Ofgem has announced today that from 1 April 2021 the price cap will return to pre-pandemic levels, principally as a result of changes in wholesale energy prices.

When wholesale prices fell sharply last year in the wake of the first lockdown, the level of the price cap fell by £84 in October to its lowest level yet for the current winter period.

Demand for energy has since recovered which has pushed wholesale prices back up to more normal levels

For six months from 1 April the price cap will increase by £96 to £1,138 for 11 million default tariff customers, and by £87 to £1,156 for 4 million pre-payment meter customers.

The price cap protects consumers who have not switched energy supplier by ensuring they pay a fair price for their electricity and gas.

Ofgem adjusts the level of the cap up or down twice a year to reflect the costs of supplying electricity and gas for suppliers.

Households on default tariffs are saving an estimated £75-£100 a year or £1 billion in total on their energy bills as a result.

Consumers who want to avoid the increase and save money should shop around ahead of the increase in the price cap on 1 April.

Jonathan Brearley, chief executive of Ofgem, said:

“Energy bill increases are never welcome, especially as many households are struggling with the impact of the pandemic. We have carefully scrutinised these changes to ensure that customers only pay a fair price for their energy.

“The price cap offers a safety net against poor pricing practices, saving customers up to £100 a year, but if they want to avoid the increase in April they should shop around for a cheaper deal

“As the UK still faces challenges around COVID-19, during this exceptional time I expect suppliers to set their prices competitively, treat all customers fairly and ensure that any household in financial distress is given access to the support they need.

“The government and Ofgem have been working with the energy industry and consumer groups to support customers through this difficult time and I urge anyone worried about paying their energy bills to contact their supplier and access the help available.”

For the default tariff price cap level starting on 1 April, Ofgem has also allowed suppliers to claim £23 to cover higher levels of bad debt from more customers being unable to pay their energy bills due to the impact of COVID-19.

This will ensure suppliers can continue to supply energy and protect their customers, especially those in vulnerable circumstances.

Suppliers are required to provide emergency credit to customers struggling to top up their pre-payment meters, put those who are behind on their bills on affordable repayment plans and should not disconnect their customers.

Many have gone further in providing support over the last year, for example helping pre-payment meter customers who are shielding to top up.

Help available for consumers:
Ofgem rules require suppliers to offer emergency credit to pre-payment meter customers and put customers struggling to pay their energy bills on realistic and sustainable debt repayment plans based on their ability to pay.

If customers are struggling to pay for energy bills they should contact their energy supplier as soon as possible. Depending on their circumstances, customers may be eligible for extra help with their energy bills or services, such as payment breaks, suspending credit meter disconnections, and schemes like the Winter Fuel Payment or Warm Home Discount rebate.

The Citizens Advice consumer service can provide advice on how customers can resolve problems with their energy provider. For complex or urgent cases, or if a person is in a vulnerable situation they may then be referred onto the Extra Help Unit.

For help on how to switch to a better deal, see Ofgem’s guide

The price cap is a cap on a unit of gas and electricity, with standing charges taken into account. It is not a cap on customers’ overall energy bills, which will still rise or fall in line with their energy consumption.
The £1,138 per year level of the cap is based on a household with typical consumption on a dual electricity and gas bill paying by direct debit. Customers who pay by standard credit (cash or cheque) pay an additional £85 based on the higher cost for suppliers to serve them. The additional allowance for COVID-19 bad debt (see below) does not apply to the pre-payment meter level of the cap, which explains the wider difference for the next price cap period. The values shown in the text above include VAT, and are expressed for the current Typical Domestic Consumption Values (TDCV) of 2,900kWh of electricity, 12,000kWh of gas, and 4,200kWh of electricity for Economy 7.

Wholesale adjustment: Following a judicial review (JR), a judge ordered Ofgem to reconsider how we calculated wholesale energy costs for the first cap period when the default cap was introduced. We made a one-off £15 temporary wholesale adjustment for the current price cap period so suppliers can recover these costs. This adjustment will be removed for the next price cap period starting on 1 April. It does not apply to the prepayment level of the cap.

COVID-19 bad debt: The default tariff price cap from 1 April includes an additional allowance to allow suppliers to start to recover some of their additional costs related to COVID-19, such as higher levels of bad debt from more customers being unable to pay their energy bills. This is based on a highly conservative assessment. In order to minimise the impact on consumers of higher bills, suppliers will have to recover some of the costs in a phased approach between April 2021 and March 2022. On Tuesday Ofgem published the additional allowance with benchmark consumption calculations as £23.69. Using new TDCV values the allowance is £23.14.

From 1 October the equivalent per unit level of the price cap to the nearest pence for a typical customer paying by direct debit will be 19p per kWh for electricity customers and 3p per kWh for gas customers.

Suppliers buy electricity and gas on the wholesale markets in advance, purchasing ‘forward contracts’ gradually over time. The default tariff price reflects suppliers’ costs because we use the wholesale prices of the relevant forward contracts that were sold in advance during an ‘observation window’ before each six-month price cap period.  The observation window for the summer price cap period (April – September) is the previous August – January.

The observation window for the winter price cap period (October – March) is the previous February – July.  The graphs below show a) how wholesale gas and electricity prices for the relevant contracts on offer in each observation window result in an allowance that reflects suppliers’ average costs:

Ofgem analysis at the time the default tariff cap was introduced on 1 January 2019 suggests that the default tariff price cap would have reduced the price of the average standard variable tariffs from the six largest suppliers by around £75 to £100 per year since April 2015 had it been in place over this period. The research shows suppliers have consistently charged more than the indicative level of the default tariff cap, which reflects the estimated costs of an efficient supplier. This analysis suggests had the cap not been introduced on 1 January 2019, customers would be paying significantly more. However, it is impossible to estimate an exact savings figure going forward as suppliers can no longer price above the level of the cap. Information and materials for consumers about the price caps is available at: www.ofgem.gov.uk/energy-price-caps.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

OfGem information

What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me? What rates can I expect to be available to me?

What type of contract do I have and when does it expire? If you are unsure of your contract status, you can find out from your supplier by asking them to check your end date. Or you could instruct us to do so on your behalf with a single LETTER OF AUTHORITY (LOA).

Types of contract
How you use gas and electricity as a business will differ from the average household. So business energy contracts are different, with offers varying between business energy suppliers.

It’s important to understand your type of contract so you can check you are getting the best deal for your business usage. If you are a microbusiness, certain rules apply which affect how you are billed too.

Deemed and out-of-contract
A deemed contract normally applies if you move into new business premises and don’t agree a contract. You could also be on a deemed or out-of-contract contract if your current contract ends but the supplier continues supplying energy that you use. This might happen if the original contract does not state what will happen at the end of a contract or does not have renewal provisions.

Deemed and out-of-contact contracts are usually among a supplier’s most expensive. It’s best to shop around and agree on a contract as soon as you take on premises or near an end-date to avoid paying more.

Fixed
You’re charged a set rate per unit of energy (measured in kWh) for the fixed term of the contract. This doesn’t fix your total bill, which will go up or down with your energy usage.

Variable
Where the rate charged per unit of energy (measured in kWh) is linked to market activity. So your rate per unit of energy could change throughout your contract.

Rollover
This normally applies if you’ve not agreed a different contract before your current contract end date and there are no renewal provisions. If you are a microbusiness, this contract can’t last more than 12 months.

How business energy contracts differ
They are usually longer
Business energy contracts often last up to five years or more in length with most one to three years. You’re usually tied into the contract until you enter a switching window in the contract. Normally this is near the contract end date. If you don’t give notice to your supplier about a planned switch in this period, you could roll over to an expensive default contract. It’s important to know your business contract end date and the notice periods required.

There’s not normally a cooling-off period
Household energy contracts offer 14 days to cancel from the date you agree a contract if you change your mind. Most business energy contracts don’t offer this, though it is worth asking about.

You don’t need to sign an energy contract for it to be binding
You could agree a contract on the phone. It’s best to ask for all terms to be sent in writing before you agree to an offer.

They are usually single-fuel
You’ll typically need to get separate quotes for gas and electricity contracts when shopping around, and will be billed separately for each too.

Broker costs
Energy4 does not place Consultant fees directly onto Bills. Many do presently. This will be clearly marked in bills. If you are presently using a business that has incorporate their fee, depending on your broker’s agreement with a supplier, it is best to ask for all terms of a broker agreement. This can be used when communicating with OfGem especially as many brokerage consultant fees added are never discussed with the Client, however added in subclauses to the back of contracts.

Deemed energy contracts
If you are on a deemed energy contract, a supplier must not:

  • Stop you from switching to another supplier, for any reason or at any time. For example, they can’t object to you transferring for reasons of debt or contract.
  • Say you need to give notice before ending the deemed contract or charge you a termination fee.
  • If you use energy on a deemed contract, your supplier must:
  • Take all reasonable steps to provide the principal terms of the deemed contract, including charges and fees
  • Provide you with a copy of the full contract if you ask for it
  • Take all reasonable steps to tell you about other available contracts and how you can get information about them
  • Take all reasonable steps to ensure that the terms of its deemed contract are not unduly onerous.

Rollover energy contracts
A supplier can move you onto a rollover energy contract if you have not told them you plan to end a contract before the notice period runs out.

If you are a microbusiness the rollover contract can’t last more than 12 months.

Microbusiness energy contract notice periods and switching
For microbusiness customers, suppliers must:

  • Put the contract end date and notice period on all bills for fixed-term contracts. The maximum notice period to end a microbusiness energy contract is 30 days.
    allow you to tell them if you want to switch at the end of your contract at any time before the notice period.

Qualifying as a microbusiness
Suppliers must take all reasonable steps to identify if you are a microbusiness. If they do not think you qualify, supply them with supporting evidence. This should include evidence that your business either:

  • Employs fewer than 10 employees (or full time equivalent) and has an annual turnover or balance sheet no greater than €2 million
  • Uses up to 100,000 kWh of electricity per year.
  • Uses up to 293,000 kWh of gas per year.

Half-hourly energy readings (‘P272’ and ‘P322’ codes)
Changes to industry rules mean suppliers now record business energy use every half hour, as part of a process called ‘settlement’. You’ll be moved onto these arrangements when you renew a business energy contract or switch supplier. You’re only affected if you’re a business customer in profile classes 5-8 and have an advanced meter. If you’re not sure, check with your supplier.

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW

Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat

To discuss further, please contact Energy4

Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816

Email: contact@energy4.co.uk

Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Click here to contact Energy4 today

Contact Energy4 today for further information

Further information

What type of contract do I have and when does it expire?

What type of contract do I have and when does it expire?

What type of contract do I have and when does it expire?

What you need to know when moving into a new property? If you have recently moved into a property, then your electricity and gas suppliers will be the same as the previous tenants. It’s important you do this shortly after taking occupation of the property as your supplies might be on out of contract rates which are much higher than conventional business energy rates. Contact Energy4 now to see what we can do to help you Budget wisely Ultimately, it’s your business’ available capital which will dictate your decision to move premises, and have the biggest influence on the size of the property you’re able to move into. Whether you have a small or large budget, we’d recommend that you use a local relocation agency to help organise the move and ensure you don’t overspend. Relocation agents can provide guidance on financial elements like business rates and rent, so you’re not stung by unexpected costs. They can also provide a pricing forecast for any refurbishment, and help make those tough planning decisions which could see expenses escalate From your first meeting with an agent, you should have a reasonable idea of how much the relocation will cost, and what it’s likely to set you back in the long term. If you don’t plan on using an agent, this guide on how to calculate business relocation costs could prove useful in helping you set a realistic budget — assessing everything from leasing costs and insurance to utility prices and licensing. Before you begin the relocation process, find a good solicitor and ensure they’re involved from the outset. A specialist commercial property solicitor can help enormously with any landlord negotiation, and can vet any legal documentation before you sign on the dotted line — ensuring your interests are protected. Take time to plan your office move Moving business premises isn’t as simple as moving house. If you consider the complete process from finding a property to agreeing lease terms to completing the fit-out, moving business premises will typically take a year or more (though this depends on the size and type of the business). This makes it crucial to plan ahead, and give yourself enough time to effectively manage the move from the initial consultation to moving day. Making the decisions required to find a suitable business premises will take time to investigate and research, so you should factor time into your overall budget — making sure you can feasibly orchestrate the move whilst juggling the day-to-day responsibilities of your business. Ideally, you should assign enough time to research every aspect of the relocation in detail, so you can be confident that your business can cope with the pressure of moving premises — both financially and logistically. Size and layout considerations While it’s easy to assume that investing in a larger premises will make for a more flexible working environment, this isn’t always the case. The layout of the property should also be considered, ensuring that your team members are able to collaborate effectively and utilise flexible arrangement options. In a guide on what to look for in new business premises, Gazprom Energy touches on the importance of choosing a site which isn’t only bigger, but also meets the needs of your business in terms of plan, design and layout. Businesses should consider when choosing their next business premises: ‘It’s important to have a clear plan for how the new office space will be used both now and in the future – as well as thinking about what kind of culture you want to reinforce with the workspace and communal areas in the new building. When your software works they way you want to. Software solutions. Working wonders ‘Don’t forget that moving premises is a change for people, so it’s vital to get your employees on-board. Involving them in the decisions regarding the layout, furniture and facilities can build support for the move. Also, be sure you identify everything that needs to be done beforehand. Managing this well can have a real positive impact on employee engagement and help make sure the move is a success.’ Consider accessibility From your staff to your clients, people need to reach your premises easily, so accessibility should be at the top of your agenda when moving business premises. When choosing a property with good accessibility, you’ll need to consider everything from nearby public transport and road links to car parking and access for delivery vehicles. Finding premises with good accessibility isn’t just a matter of convenience. Depending on the type of business, location can have a huge impact on its commercial performance and potential revenue. Areas with greater footfall may be perfect for retailers, but they’re also liable to be more expensive — meaning they may not be suitable for other types of businesses. Make sure the area you choose is suitable for your type of business. The ease at which staff can travel to work should also be considered, so make sure you assess the local transport infrastructure. Recently, an NHS report emerged suggesting that long commutes are having a negative impact on workers’ physical and mental health — effects which are then being felt in the workplace through poor performance, reduced motivation and diminished workplace satisfaction. To retain staff and cultivate a happy, healthy workplace, make employee access the primary focus of your office move. Security issues Whatever your type of business, valuable assets like stock and equipment mean your premises could be targeted by thieves. Security should, therefore, be a high priority, protecting your property from criminals. Of course, security provision is dependent on whether you are buying or renting a property. When letting premises, find out what kind of security is in place before signing the contract, as the tenancy agreement may limit what kind of equipment can be installed later.If you’re buying a property, carefully check the planning regulations before installing security equipment like CCTV cameras and alarm control systems — particularly if it’s a listed or old building. This guide can give you a good idea of the different types of security measures every business should have in place to protect its assets. Change of ownership If you’re planning to sell your property, and your heating system is to be included in the sale, it’s important that you let us know as you will no longer own it. You can do this by phone, email or letter. You’ll need to contact us 28 days in advance of the sale going through. By getting this information to us as soon as possible, you’ll allow us to issue you the correct payment. This avoids any need for you to repay any money as you’re no longer eligible for payments once you’ve sold your property. You agree to this when you apply and it’s part of your ongoing obligations to notify us if your property is transferred to a new owner. Not notifying us will also cause delays if the new owner plans to join the scheme. What you need to do You need to provide us with one of the following documents as soon as possible after the sale of the property has taken place: A completed TR1 form or Scottish equivalent (such as a deed of disposition) A copy of the title deed showing the date of the transfer of ownership A copy of a letter from your solicitor confirming the date of the sale (this does not need to be addressed to us and can be correspondence from your solicitor to you). The letter must include the property address, your name and the legal date of the transfer. When do your payments stop? Any remaining payments will be paid to you up until the day before the legal transfer of the property is complete. For example, if the date of transfer is 1 January, you’ll be paid up to and including 31 December. You’ll then receive any money you’re owed once you’ve provided us with one of the documents mentioned above. If you’ve bought a property with a renewable heating system already registered on the scheme If you’re moving into a property with a renewable heating system already accredited to the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scheme, and you want to take over the Domestic RHI payments from the previous owner, you have 12 months from the date of sale of the property and renewable heating system to apply to the scheme. Your payments won’t accrue until we’re satisfied all of the eligibility criteria are met and we’ve sent you a statement of eligibility. To confirm you’re the new owner, you’ll need to provide us with one of the following documents: A completed TR1 form or Scottish equivalent (such as a deed of disposition) A copy of the title deed showing the date of the transfer of ownership A copy of a letter from your solicitor confirming the date of the sale (this does not need to be addressed to us and can be correspondence from your solicitor to you). The letter must include the property address, your name and the legal date of the transfer TA10 form “fittings and fixtures” As the new owner, you will need to get the most up to date Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) and Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) certificate numbers and provide them to us. You can ask the previous owner of the domestic plant for these certificate numbers. You can download the relevant EPC for your property from the Landmark Registry website in England and Wales or the Energy Savings Trust website in Scotland. Alternatively you can get information or assistance by calling the Landmark Registry on 03300 366 024 or the Energy Saving Trust on 0808 808 2282. When do your payments start? Payments will start to accrue from the point that you are accepted on to the scheme. Payments are made following the existing payment schedule. Contact Energy4 today for further information Location: 25 Hartley Meadow, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28 7BW Opening Hours: 8:00 – 17:00 Mon to Sat To discuss further, please contact Energy4 Telephone: Call us on 01642 888814 & 01642 888816 Email: contact@energy4.co.uk Please provide the best date and time of day that we should contact you Click here to contact Energy4 today Contact Energy4 today for further information Further information business gas business electricity What you need to know when moving into a new property? What you need to know when moving into a new property? What you need to know when moving into a new property? What you need to know when moving into a new property? What you need to know when moving into a new property? business gas business electricity

Why is it best to choose our services rather than doing it myself?

  • Energy4 buying power and knowledge, depending on the number of suppliers you use and the size of your business, the process of analysing, reviewing and negotiating to make sure you are on the best tariff can be very time consuming.
  • By using Energy4 services you avoid the stress but benefit from the good results.
  • Unlike other cost reduction companies, Energy4 is registered and regulated by 27 utility suppliers. We are able to identify from the sheer number of tariffs the most competitive for your business
  • Energy4 works diligently and ethically on your behalf taking out all the stresses and wasted resources from your business
  • Energy4 background in industrial Cost Reduction Analysis we validate everything in your energy account you can be assured that we have looked very closely
  • Energy4 skills and experience provides us with the ability to strategically analyse your invoices and usage, and then find the best solutions to help you reduce costs.
  • Energy4 have expert negotiating skills for obtaining any rebates due to you for backdating incorrect tariffs and we do all this on your behalf, leaving you to concentrate on running your business.
  • Energy4 has many good reviews for the excellent service provided. Energy4 can be trusted to deliver.
  • Historically those companies who do not seek advice are more likely to be mis-sold utilities. Communicating only with your present supplier, and another supplier is not good business sense. Energy4 is still seeing Consultant fees added onto Business Bills, these are not needed at all, but shows that many business owners do not understand the utility industry.
  • Asking for business help is incorrectly seen as weakness. This is the product of poor management and bad business practices. Successful businesses bring in help in areas businesses do not understand, or have time to deal with.
  • Energy4 exists to help businesses stay in businesses, without Energy4 businesses will leave themselves open to poor information, bad contracts, and excessive costs they never needed to pay.

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What Is A FAQ Page?

A great FAQ page is one of the most important elements of your business website. While your company needs to have great content and clean architecture to provide a great user experience. Your site FAQ section will draw most of your traffic and convert more customers.

FAQ pages are an integral part of good navigation and the customer journey for most websites. This section of your site is the go-to area for your audience who want to learn more about your business and find out why your products and services are what they want.

Whenever someone clicks on the FAQ page you know, they in your business. For many people, the website FAQ page is the second page they go to after the Home or Services pages. Instead of guessing what topics you should cover, you can use several online marketing tools for small business to help you understand the needs of your customers. This is a great way to optimize your Frequency Asked Questions page before spending a lot of time or resources on the task.

For many people, the website FAQ page is the second page they go to after the Home or Services pages. Your FAQ section needs to include high-quality content that will help your customers understand your products and services quickly.

This means that your FAQ page can play a central role in driving your audience to paying customers. It is a good idea to invest in high-quality content for your FAQ page to ensure that your content converts and helps your business reach your goals.

Along with the technical questions and answers, your FAQ section will establish you as an authority in your industry. The FAQ page shows that you know so much about your products and services that you can answer questions before they are even asked! 

You can also use your FAQ page as a form of social proof because your business can establish your website as a valuable asset to drive sales.

Finally, your website Frequency Asked Questions page will reduce a lot of stress from your customer service department. Instead of fielding a large volume of accessible to answer questions. Your business should promote your FAQ page to your clients as their go-to source of information about your business.

 

Could You Use An Extra 1,377 Monthly Visitors?

Wondering how an FAQ page can help your company? Check out the full case study to see how our website copywriting & content marketing helped Export Solutions today!

 

The Main Benefits Of Your FAQ Page Explained

Along with being a central location of your website, your visitors will go to your FAQ page if they want to learn more about your products and offerings.

Since your Frequency Asked Questions section will be the highlight of your website, you should link to product pages from the FAQ page. This will help your internal linking strategy and spread the benefits of a great SEO strategy to other areas of your website.

 

1. Your FAQ Help You Address Your Reader’s Needs

If you want to increase the usability of your site, improve your business authority, and increase conversions, then you need to have an excellent FAQ section. Think of your FAQ page as the main hub that your customers can go to with their questions.

 

One of the strongest reasons to have a FAQ section is to address the needs of your readers. Since your customers that they want more information about your products and services by going to your FAQ page. You should provide high-quality content about your business on the FAQ page.

The best thing you can do to overcome objections and increase sales is to provide accurate information to address questions your customers might be asking. Instead of allowing uncertainty to prevent a sale, you can use their items as fuel to establish your business as an industry leader and drive more conversions.

 

2. Establish Your Business As An Expert

Whenever you ask someone a question, you are seeking their advice because you view them as experts This same thing occurs when your customers ask you questions about your product and services. Since your customers want to know information about issues that your business knows about, you can use your FAQ section as a way to establish your business as a trusted expert.

Whenever your audience asks you questions about your business, you can establish yourself as an expert by answering their questions with great information.

Your competition is working to draw your customers to them, so you should do everything you can to establish yourself as a trusted expert. Providing excellent answers to the questions your customers are asking is the best way for you to be a reliable source.

Use your FAQ section to help your business earn the trust of your customers. You can use your FAQ section as the first touchpoint with your customers where you can direct your customers to begin the relationship that will convert them into paying customers.

 

3. Improve Your Sales

If your business has an optimized FAQ section on your website, then you will see an increase in conversions since the percentage of visitors on your website will buy your products and services.

However, having an FAQ page with miscellaneous information won’t do the trick.

Your FAQ page needs to be tailored to the specific needs of your customers. In addition to having focused content, you should have links from your FAQ page to your product pages and online shop.

More advanced tactics for a FAQ page is to compare your products and services to those of your competition. This will give you a natural way to show the advantages of your business compared to your competition.

 

4. Boost Your Search Engine Optimization

Search engines love FAQ pages because they provide relevant content to help Google understand your business.

This means that you need lots of good content to help your business get found in search engines. Your website’s FAQ page is the perfect place to publish lots of interesting information about your business, products, and services.

You can also leverage your FAQ page to include long-tail keywords that your customers are searching for. Since you are already providing information about your business, you can add keyword-rich content so when someone searches for your products and services they will find your FAQ page.

The questions and answers you include on your FAQ page will on the user personas that you have to build to represent your customers. As you continue to develop more answers for this section, you will find this page will rank high in search engines.

This is why you should include specific and detailed questions on your FAQ page. This section should contain relevant information about your business so you can get picked up in search engines like Google and Bing.

 

A Few Tips For Writing Your FAQ Page

To write a great FAQ page, you will need to know what your customers are asking most often. You should think about whether your clients ask about individual features and unsure about some technical aspects of your products and services.

If your clients ask about your features, then you can provide accurate answers in your FAQ section and build out that information on the product pages.

Your FAQ page should complement information that exists elsewhere on your site. This approach will help your website rank for that information, and save you time producing the FAQ page since the content exists on your product pages.

 

Your Boring Content Is Losing You

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Since your visitors will be consuming your content on different devices and in specific ways you need to create your FAQ section to be displayed in various forms. Here are some ideas to help you write compelling FAQ content that can also be scanned and answers found.

Put yourself in your customer’s shoes to figure out what questions or problems they might experience. Provide in-depth and valuable solutions to these issues.

Your answers to the FAQs should be informative to give insight about your business, the products and services, and always point back to benefits and value. Be concise enough to offer information that is necessary but doesn’t be too wordy because you don’t want to lose your customers as they are asking questions about your company.

Format your content for easy consumption as needed. Your content should be easy to scan. You can use bullet points and short paragraphs to help your readers consume your content.

Be sure to double-check your information. Your FAQ sections need to be accurate especially if you are writing about technical topics.

Organize your questions and answers in similar groups. Your customers want to find answers.

 

How We Build A Great FAQ Page For Our Clients

We have already discussed why an FAQ page is important for your website, but I think it’s important to look at how you can build an FAQ page that gets you found in search engines and drives qualified leads.

One of the first things to remember when building an FAQ page is that you are trying to provide answers to specific questions that your customers have. Your answers should be educational in nature, but you should also make your answers lean towards getting your customers to engage with you and convert. This is in their best interest, and you can encourage them to interact with you by providing the answers they are looking for and setting yourself up as an authority in the market.

We did this exact thing for Export Solutions with their Import & Export Compliance FAQ page. Prior to our updates, this FAQ page was bare bones and not very helpful to readers. This resulted in low Impressions and nearly zero clicks- neither are good for their business. We took a thorough approach to update the page and here are some elements that we considered when building the page:

We used real questions. Our team looked through contact forms and listened to voicemail messages from actual customers to find out what people were asking about different aspects of trade compliance. In addition to listening to customers, we also used different tools to find other questions that mattered to Export Solutions customers.

We categorized questions into groups. After we got done scouring contact forms and listening to dozens of voicemails, we set out to organize the questions into five large groups. Each of these groups contained questions related to the main topic, and each group of questions relating to a service that Export Solutions offers.

We sent the questions to experts for answers. We are not experts in trade consulting, so we sent the questions with direction to the team at Export Solutions. We asked their team to provide a 150-200 word response to each question. This part of the process ensured that the FAQ uses correct information to address customer questions.

We added an intro to each FAQ section. We wanted to help the content get found in search engines so we added a 1-2 paragraph intro to each FAQ section. This information provides general insight to what each section will cover, why it is important, and who the answers are fo.

We added links to blog posts and service pages. We knew that the FAQ page will get lots of traffic, so we wanted to extend the value of the FAQ page for Export Solutions. To do this we added a link to relevant blog posts and service pages when appropriate. Doing this improved the flow of information throughout the site, and these links provided the customer with a way to learn more about the topic and reach out to the Export Solutions team.

Add lots of CTAs throughout the page. Since the FAQ page will get lots of traffic from customers seeking specific answers, we wanted to give customers a great reason to reach out to the Export Solutions team. We added several CTA buttons and forms on the page to attract clicks and engagement.

Improve Your Website With A Great FAQ Page

Many businesses bury their FAQ section at the bottom of their website, and this makes it difficult to for your customers to find. If your audience can’t find your FAQ page, then they can’t find the answers they want to make a sale from your website.

Since the FAQ page is also an excellent way to rank in search engines your business needs to ensure you use long-tail keywords and real-life questions to draw qualified leads. Not only will this help Google find your content, but it will also establish you as a leader in your industry.

This new level of trust will contribute to drive your audience towards a purchase and help you reach your sales goals!

If you are ready to drive more online sales with a professional website copywriter, then shoot me an email today! I will work with you to understand your audience and write compelling copy that will get your business more online sales!

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